or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › Your short and sweet answer to "Why do you homeschool?"
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Your short and sweet answer to "Why do you homeschool?" - Page 6

post #101 of 107
Quote:
An example is that when we shop at the grocery store for (some of our) food, we buy fresh organic foods and my dc notice on their own that other people's carts are full of boxed items. Naturally, they were curious about why other people have boxes in their carts while we have food. If they fill their carts with boxes, what do they eat? Well, those boxes contain what they eat. Do they contain food? Sometimes and it depends on what's in the boxes.
I know this is not really the point of the thread, but you'd think children this age, who have been to a grocery store, would be well aware that food sometimes comes in boxes. Even organic foods.

I like the "it's none of our business" line, especially if the child seems to be judging or looking for YOU to judge. Sometimes children, especially at around 7 or 8 years old, want validation for their choices and seek to reject the opposite choice. (Heck, adults do this too.) Kids are very black-and-white at certain ages.
post #102 of 107

Parents

I am seriously considering homeschooling my children, but my parents are 100% against it. Not that I have to have their approval, but it would be nice to have them understand and accept our choice.

Any ideas/advice on how to answer the "Why do you homeschool?" question to family members?
post #103 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by lulabelle View Post
I am seriously considering homeschooling my children, but my parents are 100% against it. Not that I have to have their approval, but it would be nice to have them understand and accept our choice.

Any ideas/advice on how to answer the "Why do you homeschool?" question to family members?
I'm probably not the best person to reply to this, because I'm not close with any of my family members so I don't really care what they think....

But I would say, if pressed to explain, that the freedom is appealing and the family-centered lifestyle is attractive.
post #104 of 107

Love the overwhelming Thoughts on the subject!

I loved reading all the thoughts on how to explain homeschooling to passer byers. I would add this as well only if you feel it necessary or when they try to compare it to private schooling...

"Why send our kids to learn from someone else when we can do just the same here at home or even better. It is just like sending them to a Montessori school except without the cost! The Montessori is private school, expensive but a natural way of teaching/learning therefore I can use it's philosophy here at home! " and SMILE! "It is a wonderful way to save money and increase valuable time with your family teaching/learning the ways of life in the real world (rather than at a desk on paper)."

Ok maybe leave out the last few words and bit your tongue as you may feel it necessary to say to much as we homeschoolers like to defend our ground to often.

Best wishes and remember it doesn't matter what others think, it only matters that you know you are doing the right thing for you and your family!!
post #105 of 107
I generally stick to "it's what works for my family", but if I give a more detailed answer it goes along the lines of:
"our kids grow so quickly and the basis of their whole lives is formed in those precious years, that I feel it is my responsibility and priveledge to be spending that time with them and teaching them, rather than leaving the shaping of their lives to strangers, who may or may not share my life philosophies; and while I understand that it is not eveyone's choice and I respect that, it is ours"
... though I guess it ends up sounding like I am judging their choices, it is so difficult to put it across in such a way that I can say how I feel without feeling like I am judging others, but then if they feel judged, maybe it is because of their own feelings and not the fact that I have differing views?!
post #106 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by waiflywaif View Post
I know this is not really the point of the thread, but you'd think children this age, who have been to a grocery store, would be well aware that food sometimes comes in boxes.
to this day i am surprised when I see other people's carts, and how many boxes they contain. when you don't buy the boxes yourself, and don't even go down all those aisles, it is easy to forget that they are even there.
post #107 of 107
Quote:
Any ideas/advice on how to answer the "Why do you homeschool?" question to family members?
depending on how your relationship is with them how about:

- "the way she has been learning since birth, with all her natural curiosity and absorbing things at her own pace, works best and we want to encourage it to continue a while longer"

or invite them to meet other hs families, either at your place or at an event. most ppl who are anti-hs have never actually met anyone who does it (or has only met those who do it for reasons with which they disagree).

you mgiht want to find out what specifically they fear about hs. even if you plan to hs indefinitely, you might say that you are taking it one year at a time, and merging into the school system later will not be a problem, ifyou decide to do so.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at Home and Beyond
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › Your short and sweet answer to "Why do you homeschool?"