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My junk food issues - Page 3

post #41 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraLoo View Post
My dd's K class asked for $20 from each student for the school year and then the teacher would purchase the snacks to get away from the junkie type of snacks that often are donated. I thought it was a great idea.

I quiz my dd each day on what she had for snack. They get graham crackers, cereal (Trix, Lucky Charms, Frosted Cheerios), pretzels, a wide variety of crackers, popcorn, tortilla chips, cookies (presumably packaged store bought,) and then they get candy & other treats for holidays and special events as well as birthday treats brought in by the parents which is about 2 or 3 times a month. On the surface, this is probably much better than what it could be, but I dislike a lot of the food dyes, preservatives and sugar content in a lot of those snacks. Not once has fresh fruit or veggies been offered. I think my idea of a healthy is much different than the teacher's. The nice bus driver also hands out suckers on a regular basis.
THis, totally. Today's my DS1's snack was peaches. To me, peaches in a plastic cup is a treat, but to them, that's mega healthy. They'll do peaches and water, crackers and juice, etc. They think b/c it's not Rice Crispy Treats it's great, and it certainly is better, but I wish they'd charge the extra $$ and give them a cheese stick and an apple. But OTOH, they don't have a refrigerator, so all the snacks have to be non-perishable. I guess it could be worse--Lucky Charms would send me around the bend. I guess that'll be next year's rant.
post #42 of 91
But you're not even safe with fresh fruits and veggies! Apples and peaches and grapes for example are HEAVILY LOADED with pesticides if they're not organic. Same for peppers and celery- so a veggie platter isn't a sure bet either. I won't touch most non-organic produce.

And milk? I agree with the poster who said it's no different than a sprite- I actually might go for the sprite first over the hormone ridden, pasteurized, homogenized, science project most "milk" is these days.

Can't even take a sip out of a drinking fountain unless you want flouride, chlorine, lead, and a cocktail of flushed RX drugs in your body. I really hate that even friggin tap water is tainted.
post #43 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
No, homemade fruit leather looks pretty much like fruit rollups. Before dehydrated, it's a thick liquid, then when it's dehydrated, it's in a sticky sheet like a fruit roll up. Nutritionally it's like dried fruit, though.

Dd used to like it, but has kind of outgrown (?) it. Anyway, she doesn't ask me to make it anymore, thank goodness... took forever!
hmm....I've seen homemade fruit leather and I didn't think it looked anything like a fruit rollup - about as thin, but totally different appearance and texture. Plus, I tried to rull up my piece (for walking out to the van) and it cracked.
post #44 of 91
Tell me about it. My non-daycared, non-Mainly-Musiced-anymore-because-I-got-lazy, hardly-ever-has-playdates 2-year-old DD goes to the church creche every week on Thursdays while I have Bible study. MSG-laden chips and crackers, marshmallows, lollies. She LOVES salty things and will eat chips and crackers indefinitely. The food could be worse - sometimes it at least includes apple, not that she chooses it over crackers, and the kids drink water, not juice. But still, I was just reading up on the evils of MSG, so the thought that she gets a dose every week doesn't thrill me! I guess I should bring snacks, but it's a pain because I already bring baking for the adults in the Bible study.

We are planning to homeschool, and yep - one of the reasons (minor in the grand scheme, but hey) is that she won't feel bad about eating healthy food while her classmates get a packet of chips and a yoghurt-coated muesli bar every day! I used to get so jealous of my friends' junk food... DH works from home, and it'll be great for us all to keep sitting down to homemade soup and bread or toasted sandwiches or egg foo yung for lunch every day. But what I'll do about the extracurriculars, I don't know... Yipes!
post #45 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raine822 View Post
Some people have tried to tell me that fruit snacks/fruit roll ups are healthy because they are made from fruit. WHAT?
You can get non candy ones. Sun-rype makes some, they are just fruit.
post #46 of 91
Whew, I never realized that this problem existed on this scale. DD was in Montessori-based daycare until she was two and now is in a Pre-K - 8 Montessori school. In both places we were/are required to bring all of her lunches and snacks. In fact, both places have a no-sharing policy. Some of this may be due to the fact that both places were comprised of diverse groups of kids. At her current school, there are kids that observe kosher and Halal dietary laws, and there are a lot of vegetarians. Another factor is the food allergy issue. Aside from that, most of our friends/family have the same dietary habits that we do, so it has never really been an issue for us. DD does get sweets at home or when we're on trips, but DH and I pretty much take a balance approach.

One thing that has helped is that DH and I have spent a lot of time figuring out how to make DD's lunches and snacks appealing so that she is less inclined to be jealous of other kids' snacks. We also have this game now with one of our puppets: the puppet has no teeth and feels incredibly tired and sick all the time. Why? Because all she eats is junk! It has been a good learning tool because DD will actually point out "junk" when she sees it. I mean, she sees kids eating "junk" when we simply walk down the street. Embarrassingly, she'll loudly point it out sometimes. It has been a challenge keeping her mind focused on eating healthy stuff, but constant reinforcement seems to have worked thus far.
post #47 of 91
My oldest dd is in 2nd grade and I am astonished at the amount of junk they try to give the kids at school. I try to eat healthy, but we do still eat out once in a while. I really don't want it piled on my growing dd everyday though. What I have done is send snacks to school with her and pack her lunch everyday. She has serious behavior problems when she eats artificial food colorings, so we can tell if they gave her something. We also offer lots of healthier alternatives, so that she doesn't feel like she's not getting a treat when others are (for example- all fruit popsicles, fruit juice sweetened lollipops, pure chocolate bars, and homemade deserts). It takes work in communicating with the teachers and also alot of talking about health and nutrition with dd. She is very happy with the way things are and can't believe all the gross stuff the other kids at school have to eat at lunch (chicken nuggets, corn dogs, bbq "ribs", and the list goes on and on). We are also very lucky that the school allows us to bring her lunch into the fridge in the morning and they heat it up for her at lunchtime, so she gets a hot meal most days.
post #48 of 91
A great resource to read if you care about this issue is anything by Michael Pollan. "Food Rules" I think is the name of a little book where he boils it all down to some basic rules to keep yourself out of trouble, foodwise.

On another topic, I was listening to a story on NPR today about soda pop and they said, regarding soda machines in schools, that the soda companies don't make that much money on them, but it's the SCHOOLS that make the money off the vending machines.

So imagine how twisted that is if it is the cash-starved schools that want the stupid junk machines in there! (sigh)

As with everything, follow the money. Big corporate money on the one hand and under-funded schools on the other. The well-being of the kids gets put to the side.
post #49 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
hmm....I've seen homemade fruit leather and I didn't think it looked anything like a fruit rollup - about as thin, but totally different appearance and texture. Plus, I tried to rull up my piece (for walking out to the van) and it cracked.
Here's a good example the way we make fruit leather and how it looks pretty much like a fruit roll up when done. You must do it much differently than I do because mine is very pliable and a little bit sticky and rolls up perfectly.
post #50 of 91
Duplicate
post #51 of 91
Here in France they have - in general stopped all snacks at school because of the terrible diet habits of some of the families, the kids go into school at 8.30 and finish at 11.30 we then have lunch and then there is nothing until 4.30 when the kids come out - therefore the choices of the parents are exactly that, our kids get fruit, a homemade cake or biscuit and water, we never buy soda and our dd at 8 really doesn't enjoy soda or juice of any kind - except cranberry, and will eat chocolate but only dark - she doesn't like things if they are too sweet - thank heavens, unfortunately ds has a much sweeter tooth than dd and it's more of a problem but we're getting round it still with fruit and if I make some biscuits in dinosaur shapes, - sugar IMO in just a flavour so you can add or take away as much as you like most of the time it's not essential to a recipe so with most of the recipes I use I will half the amount of sugar - at least; as with school the activities that they partake in outwith school doesn't allow any snacks during or after the activity - there's a huge drive here to encourage folk to eat minimum of 5 fruit or veg a day - some never make it, but on the tv etc they are really pushing the healthy eating programmes with top chefs so to encourage folk to change their habits! Some of the stuff the schools have been serving up to kids is really frightening.
post #52 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
You can get non candy ones. Sun-rype makes some, they are just fruit.
My kids loooove those. Heck, so do I. I nearly died of shock one time when my trainer who was insanely strict offered me one as a treat.

I'm starting to feel pretty lucky with our experience. The only time my kids get junky juice is at church, I'm not going to begrudge since church doesn't have a lot of money. School is healthy snacks (except for special days, like yesterday the ice cream truck came), cookies are at my discretion, playdates have all sorts of goodies, but nine times out of ten, the kids all seem to go for some pita or fruit or cheese and that's about it.
post #53 of 91
Quote:
I hate to be the ranting "Back in my day" lady but - when I was a kid, we just didn't have all these snacks. We went to ball practice or played a game and then we were handed off to our parents. There were no snacks. There were no snacks for things that only took an hour or two. I don't even get the point of that. Kids are getting heavier and heavier so we've tacked a snack onto everything? And not some kind of filling snack, but just junk? You don't give a hungry kid a fruit roll up!
And you've hit the nail on the head. I don't get it either why no matter what people do these days, there has to be a snack. When my nephews go to soccer games on the weekends, it's at say 10 to 12. They eat breakfast beforehand, play, and then afterward, you'd think they'd just go straight home for lunch. But no! First a snack because NO ONE CAN GO MORE THAN 3 HOURS WITHOUT EATING, I guess. So, they eat 300 calories worth of caprisun and rice crispy treats and then aren't hungry for lunch. The crap calories crowd out the good.

It's the same thing with adults, unfortunately. My husband has noticed this at work that someone is always bringing in snacks and one of the ways the company shows it appreciates its employees isn't through raises (no one's gotten one in years) but by bringing in some sort of treat and putting it in the breakroom. My husband (who is from Finland, btw), has reached the conclusion by observing his co-workers that most Americans eat about one meal a day, it just lasts the entire day. People think he's weird because he rarely snacks but then eats quite a bit at lunch ("like a horse!" one co-worker described it) and they're always giving him snacks which he periodically brings home and dumps on us.

Why is it we can't do anything these days without food being involved? I myself can't remember the last time I got together with my friends without food being involved somehow.
post #54 of 91
I love this thread. It makes me feel a little less crazy.

The nursery in the church we attended before we moved served CORN POPS as the snack in the 1-2 year old nursery. Puffed corn w/ corn syrup on top. I had actually just finished reading In Defense of Food and I was horrified when I realized what they were handing out to the children. (In their defense, they had some children w/ wheat allergies, so the snack options were limited... but seriously, then, just don't give snacks!)

We also have the family situation. Thankfully, our families are mostly supportive (even when they think I'm being a little nutty), but I feel like I'm imposing on them by making "demands," especially w/ my in-laws. My MIL is SO, so sweet, but she grew up very poor on a farm in the Ozarks. They raised their own chickens, her mom made lots of things from scratch-- so, for her, "packaged" food still seems superior and like a luxury item (she can't even stand the taste of free range chicken eggs and won't eat even conventional brown eggs!) The worst part is that she buys things I don't like DD to eat (like, nitrate-containing bacon) and says, "Oh, I know, just let her have a little piece!" Bacon w/ nitrates is not a "treat," and I don't want DD to think that it is!

I have found that it is very, very hard to practice moderation in this area. As soon as I caved and let DD have one of the cheap-o lollies from the drive through ATM, she wanted one *every time* and came to expect it. As soon as I said, "Oh, sure, let her have the goldfish crackers" (not so bad in the grand scheme, but not an organic cheese stick, either!) it because a "special thing" that my mom always buys for her when she visits. She wants a free cookie every time we go to the grocery. She says, "But mommy, I like artificial colors!"
post #55 of 91
DD goes to a school where I have to pack snack and lunch--at first I was overwhelmed but now I really like it. Still, she likes her gogurts--and still she probably has one junky snack a day--but I feel like it could be a lot worse and I'm happy to have some control over what she's fed all day.

Birthday parties are tough--I just take my lumps and plan the rest of the day around it. I know we'll have junk and cake etc--so I plan a healthy breakfast and dinner and push water the rest of the day.

OP, you are right about 3 being a tough age and a "slippery slope"...
post #56 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
Here's a good example the way we make fruit leather and how it looks pretty much like a fruit roll up when done. You must do it much differently than I do because mine is very pliable and a little bit sticky and rolls up perfectly.
oops - I don't make it - I had someone else's. It looked like the stuff in the link, but it cracked a little when I rolled it. The fruit leather in the link looks yummy.

I think we just have a different take on what a fruit rollup looks like.
post #57 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geist View Post
And you've hit the nail on the head. I don't get it either why no matter what people do these days, there has to be a snack. When my nephews go to soccer games on the weekends, it's at say 10 to 12. They eat breakfast beforehand, play, and then afterward, you'd think they'd just go straight home for lunch. But no! First a snack because NO ONE CAN GO MORE THAN 3 HOURS WITHOUT EATING, I guess. So, they eat 300 calories worth of caprisun and rice crispy treats and then aren't hungry for lunch. The crap calories crowd out the good.

It's the same thing with adults, unfortunately. My husband has noticed this at work that someone is always bringing in snacks and one of the ways the company shows it appreciates its employees isn't through raises (no one's gotten one in years) but by bringing in some sort of treat and putting it in the breakroom. My husband (who is from Finland, btw), has reached the conclusion by observing his co-workers that most Americans eat about one meal a day, it just lasts the entire day. People think he's weird because he rarely snacks but then eats quite a bit at lunch ("like a horse!" one co-worker described it) and they're always giving him snacks which he periodically brings home and dumps on us.

Why is it we can't do anything these days without food being involved? I myself can't remember the last time I got together with my friends without food being involved somehow.
I think the frequency of snacks is connected to how frantic a lot of people's lives are. There isn't time for three sit down meals each day, so they just grab something and go.

And, honestly...I don't think there's any inherent problem with snacking a lot, and not eating "square" meals. The problem is that so many snacks contain no nutrients and are just full of calories. It's also harder to keep track of how much one is eating, but it can be done.
post #58 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
oops - I don't make it - I had someone else's. It looked like the stuff in the link, but it cracked a little when I rolled it. The fruit leather in the link looks yummy.

I think we just have a different take on what a fruit rollup looks like.
May be. I've only seen fruit rollups in ads on TV. Mine doesn't crack, though... it's pliable. And yummy according to dd. And so much healthier than the commercial stuff.
post #59 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
May be. I've only seen fruit rollups in ads on TV. Mine doesn't crack, though... it's pliable. And yummy according to dd. And so much healthier than the commercial stuff.
Oh - I wish I'd only seen them on tv. They look like plastic, imo. They're really gross, and I find it hard to believe that real fruit is involved in any part of their manufacturing.

The stuff I had sounds like yours...maybe she dehydrated it a little longer or something. It was sticky, yummy, fruity goodness. I'm getting hungry just thinking about it.

If I can ever get my kitchen clutter reduced, I'll get my dehydrator back from my mom's house. I'd like to try making homemade fruit leather. (At my current rate of decluttering process, I should be doing that in time for my grandkids to try it out...maybe.)
post #60 of 91
Our life is a 24 hour constant battle with the food-laden obstacle course that every day life has become. My son has Prader-Willi Syndrome, with the hallmark feature being an insatiable hunger and drive to eat. He is nearly 4 and the food-seeking behavior is not full blown yet but it is there. His metabolism is much slower and many people with PWS can only consume around 800-1000 calories a day, which is a starvation diet. One little donut does "hurt" quite a bit on this type of diet.

Ugh. Food is EVERYWHERE as I my son and I are now painfully aware. His daycare is actually pretty good with the snacks they provide but I would raise a stink if they served crap like pop-tarts and chips on any day, let alone a few times a week. For us, we have a medical excuse to make a fuss but it boggles my mind that schools (esp preschools) and their directors don't see how wrong it is to give a 3 year old a donut for a snack.

And the CONSTANT grazing!! Why does every activity have to include a snack (and usually an awful one at that) The NY Times had a article on this very subject which was great http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/20/dining/20gusti.html

So,I feel your pain, times 10. May is National Prader-Willi Awareness Month so this is my small plug. If you watch TV, you can see a family with PWS on Extreme Home Makeover airing on Mother's Day.
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