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My junk food issues - Page 4

post #61 of 91
I am really really worried about how we're handling food (and how it's grown, made, and sold) in this country. It's so hard to turn something around once it's this deeply entrenched and I feel like I'm down here bailing out my sinking ship with a Dixie cup. Or maybe siphoning it off with an Oreo Sipahh.
post #62 of 91
Quote:
won't eat even conventional brown eggs!
Um... she does realise brown eggs aren't healthier than white, right? They're not "wholemeal" eggs... just from different coloured chickens..? I mean, my sister used to refuse to make meringues with brown eggs because meringue is white so she figured the eggs should be too... but she was, like, eight. That is one of the oddest food hangups I've come across.
post #63 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiteNicole View Post
I am really really worried about how we're handling food (and how it's grown, made, and sold) in this country. It's so hard to turn something around once it's this deeply entrenched and I feel like I'm down here bailing out my sinking ship with a Dixie cup. Or maybe siphoning it off with an Oreo Sipahh.


I don't watch much tv so I had to Google that. Oh. My. God. Yet another reason why I can't let my children watch commercial tv.How can the people who develop these products sleep at night?
post #64 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geist View Post

Why is it we can't do anything these days without food being involved? I myself can't remember the last time I got together with my friends without food being involved somehow.
I love that part about being with friends- we all makes one or two things and share. BUT we all know each other's dietary quirks, and everything is home made (one close friend is paleo, some are gluten free, others are vegetarian, etc). On the other hand, it does bother me when I go to a social function (that isn't held with others who are sensitive to health) and everything is CRAP! No, I don't want my kids hyped on artificial colors or HFCS, or GMO grains... grr, that part does bother me.
post #65 of 91
Quote:
I love that part about being with friends- we all makes one or two things and share. BUT we all know each other's dietary quirks, and everything is home made (one close friend is paleo, some are gluten free, others are vegetarian, etc).
Yea, usually it is just something that friends do together, but after thinking of all the activities that people have where food ends up being involved, it dawned on me with a kind of horror that, wait, it's not just kids! When we go over to a friend's house after dinner, we always bring snacks, usually sweet (sure, homemade, but still!) and then there's the traditional roasting on peeps over the fire...everything we do involves food, even if we aren't hungry!
post #66 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geist View Post
Yea, usually it is just something that friends do together, but after thinking of all the activities that people have where food ends up being involved, it dawned on me with a kind of horror that, wait, it's not just kids! When we go over to a friend's house after dinner, we always bring snacks, usually sweet (sure, homemade, but still!) and then there's the traditional roasting on peeps over the fire...everything we do involves food, even if we aren't hungry!
There's an interesting article in this month's Atlantic on obesity and one of the things it mentions as part of our obesity culture is the fact that it's now socially acceptable to eat at any time, which wasn't the case 50+ years ago. I've asked my mom what snacks she ate as a child in the 50's and the question surprised her. She said they ate 3 meals a day and that was it, she didn't remember ever eating a snack at home other than popcorn on a weekend night. Now we eat at school, at church, at work, while shopping--you can stuff your pie hole 24 hours a day and no one will think anything of it until you're a candidate for bariatric surgery. Like grocery carts with a drink holder--you can't grocery shop w/o a soda or coffee!?! I had to explain the cupholder to my 5 y/o the other day--at Bass Pro Shop. And yes, we ate a box of popcorn while we were there!
post #67 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbymom05 View Post
I would think you'd be in the majority at MDC! Or you mean the whole "forbidden fruit" angle? Now I"m worried that I"ve ruined him--he's already tasted all this cr*p. He understands the nutrition of it (as much as a 4 y/o can understand), but it's hard when everyone else eats it--it's hard for me as a parent!

ETA so what would you do re: the preschool? Tell them they can't serve him the garbage everyone else eats? It's over this month, so no point in pulling him out. Always bring a snack to tee ball? Maybe I will do that--I can't believe anyone would buy, let alone eat that Froot Foot. And they wanted to give some to my 2 y/o!!!
I did do this! I told them he will bring his own, and he has. Unless it's fresh fruit or veggies he eats his own. we struggled about it for about a week and now he's happier! Plus no more sugar crashes when he gets home. We hav now gone gluten free for him and that made it easier to explain to the teacher and school. He's my kid and I have to be the one to stick up for him.
post #68 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbymom05 View Post
There's an interesting article in this month's Atlantic on obesity and one of the things it mentions as part of our obesity culture is the fact that it's now socially acceptable to eat at any time, which wasn't the case 50+ years ago. I've asked my mom what snacks she ate as a child in the 50's and the question surprised her. She said they ate 3 meals a day and that was it, she didn't remember ever eating a snack at home other than popcorn on a weekend night. Now we eat at school, at church, at work, while shopping--you can stuff your pie hole 24 hours a day and no one will think anything of it until you're a candidate for bariatric surgery. Like grocery carts with a drink holder--you can't grocery shop w/o a soda or coffee!?! I had to explain the cupholder to my 5 y/o the other day--at Bass Pro Shop. And yes, we ate a box of popcorn while we were there!
I'm not sure I totally believe that there was never any snacking in the olden days, though. On old sit coms and in old books, the kids have a snack every day after school. My mother told me that when she was a kid (in the 50s), all of the mothers on the block would get together for coffee and coffee cake every afternoon after their chores were done and the older kids had gone back to school from lunch. They'd move down the street, at one house the first day and the house to the right the next day and so on. And whoever had hosted the day before was in charge of bringing the coffee cake. Personally, having a slice of coffee cake every day sounds like more snacking than I do now!

I definitely agree that there is much more snacking than there used to be. But I think that social occasions have always included snacking. If you read old magazines there are always suggestions for what to serve at your weekly bridge game and so on. In old books, there's always a cake or cookies in the pantry for unexpected guests. Providing food has ALWAYS been a part of hosting any sort of event.

I think the difference is maybe that we do more social events than in days past, especially if you include every youth soccer game as a "social event." That's definitely something that wasn't the case 50 years ago! Maybe the difference is that these kid events weren't seen as social events akin to adults entertaining one another, but one of the signs about the waning existence of childhood in our culture is that we're imposing adult societal norms on children's events.
post #69 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lach View Post
I'm not sure I totally believe that there was never any snacking in the olden days, though. On old sit coms and in old books, the kids have a snack every day after school. My mother told me that when she was a kid (in the 50s), all of the mothers on the block would get together for coffee and coffee cake every afternoon after their chores were done and the older kids had gone back to school from lunch. They'd move down the street, at one house the first day and the house to the right the next day and so on. And whoever had hosted the day before was in charge of bringing the coffee cake. Personally, having a slice of coffee cake every day sounds like more snacking than I do now!

I definitely agree that there is much more snacking than there used to be. But I think that social occasions have always included snacking. If you read old magazines there are always suggestions for what to serve at your weekly bridge game and so on. In old books, there's always a cake or cookies in the pantry for unexpected guests. Providing food has ALWAYS been a part of hosting any sort of event.

I think the difference is maybe that we do more social events than in days past, especially if you include every youth soccer game as a "social event." That's definitely something that wasn't the case 50 years ago! Maybe the difference is that these kid events weren't seen as social events akin to adults entertaining one another, but one of the signs about the waning existence of childhood in our culture is that we're imposing adult societal norms on children's events.
True, but snacking/eating is soooo ingrained into our every waking moment now. The whole coffee klatch thing didn't emerge until the suburbs did--and I never noticed June Cleaver partaking; then again, she was a size 2--but even that was a structured activity, not something mindless or spontaneous. And the kids walked home from school, ate and walked back--if only! Now it's drive off campus, load up on trans fats, drive back, and lucky if that's all your teens are doing.

Today we don't need an excuse to eat, social or otherwise. I don't think it was as socially acceptable, even expected, to eat while shopping, while at work, while driving--heck, there weren't drive-throughs or a reason to go to them nightly ie both parents working/over-scheduled children.

I also don't think people are more likely to congregate socially now, far from it--do any of us belong to something like a weekly-meeting bridge group? How many of us do anything regularly socially that isn't kid-related? I know I don't, nor do most of my friends. Who's got the time? Most 50's moms didn't work outside the home and certainly didn't spend their time driving their children hither and yon in search of enriching activities.

And portion size, holy moly. I saw some old movie on TCM and the couple was in the theater eating popcorn--sharing this little itty bitty bag and taking out one kernel at a time to eat. The "children" popcorn you can buy now is 3x larger!

Re: the children's events becoming more like adult events, that is such an interesting observation, but I really see it more as food as a reward, or food as love and attention. A bunch of moms sitting around sharing a snack and coffee is a social event, but a bunch of kids standing around slurping down juice boxes and eating Froot Foot before scattering seems to me more about rewarding them for the game, or implying that the parents love them enough to give them a "treat"--I put it in quotation marks since the treats are so ubiquitous any specialness is destroyed.

I dunno, the point of my ramble is that all this eating has become the new normal and IMO it's a contributing factor as to we're so much fatter than we were 50 yrs ago.
post #70 of 91
About after-game snacks - could you bring watermelon? I have yet to meet a child so jaded it doesn't think watermelon's a treat. It's not just another boring fruit, you know? I'm not a fruit fan myself, but I love it...
post #71 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sara Badger View Post
I did do this! I told them he will bring his own, and he has. Unless it's fresh fruit or veggies he eats his own. we struggled about it for about a week and now he's happier! Plus no more sugar crashes when he gets home. We hav now gone gluten free for him and that made it easier to explain to the teacher and school. He's my kid and I have to be the one to stick up for him.
I sent an email yesterday requesting the snack menu so I could provide a healthier alternative on days I disagreed with. Haven't heard back so my battle will continue next week.
post #72 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokering View Post
About after-game snacks - could you bring watermelon? I have yet to meet a child so jaded it doesn't think watermelon's a treat. It's not just another boring fruit, you know? I'm not a fruit fan myself, but I love it...
That's a GREAT idea! But I've decided I'm going to broach the idea for NO snacks--I mean, give me a break, it's a 50 minute game after lunch and they all have water bottles, surely they can go home and have a snack, right? I'm going to start the vanguard against mindless 24/7 snacking. Or I'll be the mean freak mom, lol.
post #73 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbymom05 View Post
Sorry, poor choice of cut/paste and my words. I didn't mean to offend, sorry if I did. I meant in my own situation. I didn't expect a morning preschool or sports activity to include junk food, so what's my alternative, not attend? That was my sketchy thought process, not a comment on h/s. Maybe I've had too much HFCS.
Could you help the school work on setting up a healthier snack list?

Talk to directors of sports activities about the importance of nutrition for the kids?
post #74 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I think the frequency of snacks is connected to how frantic a lot of people's lives are. There isn't time for three sit down meals each day, so they just grab something and go.

And, honestly...I don't think there's any inherent problem with snacking a lot, and not eating "square" meals. The problem is that so many snacks contain no nutrients and are just full of calories. It's also harder to keep track of how much one is eating, but it can be done.
And all of this is part of the problem. Really, I don't think it's a matter of not having time to sit down to eat three meals a day, it's not making it a priority. When I was an exchange student in Germany, both my host parents worked full-time, my host mom worked more than full time running her own insurance angency and doing all the housework on top of that. Every morning she got up at 5 to start ironing, eat breakfast with my host dad and host brother before they left for the day, and then sit at the table with my host sister and me when we got up because she didn't want us to eat alone! As an American who always ate breakfast alone, I thought this was crazy, but it's a priority for them that you eat meals together, as a family. Other than the three meals a day, snacking was rare: an occasional yogurt here and there and on Sundays we had Coffee and Cake around 3 or 4.
Somehow, I can't help but think a culture that values grabbing a pastry and coffee from Starbucks on the drive to work and then snacking all morning because the pastry didn't give you the nutrients you needed, then a microwaved frozen meal followed by more snacking followed by fast food over eating an actual good meal with family is sick.

And about controlling the amount of calories, well really that's the problem. It's damn near impossible and most people don't bother. Aside from the fact that people chronically underestimate their caloric intake, I tried this in college eating "6 small meals a day" and religiously measured everything I stuck in my mouth to keep with my calorie range to lose weight. It sucked. I never felt satisfied and eating was a burden. I didn't go over because it was so rigid, but it's no wonder most people can't do this.
post #75 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommaCrystal View Post
We go to church... juice (Capri Sun) and doughnuts - then candy or chocolates as a reward for good behavior. We go to playgroup at the family resource center.... juice (Capri Sun) and doughnuts. We go to gymnastics - juice boxes at the end. These are all places where I have not control over what is served unless I take a turn serving. But I've basically been asked not to because I provide water and trail mix, dried fruit, homemade fruit roll ups or the like. A lot of these places are adopting policies where only packaged food can be served. That makes it even harder!

We go to basketball - all the concession choices are junk (at least here I feel I can say no).

We stop at grandma's house... junk. We go to Mimi's house (other grandma) MORE junk. HUGE hurt feelings if I don't go along. I've had outright ARGUMENTS with family over the JUNK! It makes no difference. Then my kids view me as the huge bad guy because I said no to the treat grandma wanted to give them.

We go to a birthday party... junk junk junk.

I go to a meeting where childcare is provided.... JUNK!

This leads to 7 days a week of JUNK JUNK JUNK JUNK JUNK JUNK JUNK! I'd say one snack a day is JUNK!

People get REALLY offended when you say no to what they serve.

What's worse it makes me MORE hyper vigilant at home! We can't enjoy a reasonable treat from time to time in our own house because every time we set foot out the door it is JUNK!
I know EXACTLY what you mean. It makes me feel so sad that I feel like *I* can't occasionally offer ds a really fun total junk food item just for a fun treat now and then...but i don't /can't because I feel like grandparetns/kid events/bday parties/ etc. sort of ruin it for us. He gets more "sometimes" foods than I'd like...and even then i don't think the ppl giving them even realize. like they think he hasn't had enough junk or something...it's sooo weird and i hate it and it makes me sad that ppl give their very young children soda and junk food
post #76 of 91
What is Froot Foot? Are you talking about Fruit by the Foot? Either way, it's gross but I was wondering what you were talking about.
post #77 of 91
"What's worse it makes me MORE hyper vigilant at home! We can't enjoy a reasonable treat from time to time in our own house because every time we set foot out the door it is JUNK! "

That drives me nuts too! I feel like I can't buy my own daughter a small valentine candy, or a chocolate easter bunny because she gets SO MUCH JUNK from both sides of our family and every event we attend.

I am thinking about pulling my daughter out of Sunday school because of all the junk they serve there. Donuts in the fellowship hall with something from a powder mix to drink, and then cookies or candy during sunday school.
post #78 of 91
I'd consider the snacks your ds's preschool serves to be a breach of contract. They promised "healthy snacks" when you agreed to pay his tuition there, they need to do that or give you a refund.

As for sports snacks, what I'm used to seeing for adults who are doing sports all day (okay, 8-12, lunch then more casually 1-4) is orange wedges, pickles, pretzels, and water. And the lunch is usually protein heavy, both the offered lunch and the lunches people pack for themselves.

Honestly, if the kids aren't running around enough to crave salts and water, they aren't running around enough. Craving sugars after physical activity means you aren't moving enough.
post #79 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geist View Post
And all of this is part of the problem. Really, I don't think it's a matter of not having time to sit down to eat three meals a day, it's not making it a priority. When I was an exchange student in Germany, both my host parents worked full-time, my host mom worked more than full time running her own insurance angency and doing all the housework on top of that. Every morning she got up at 5 to start ironing, eat breakfast with my host dad and host brother before they left for the day, and then sit at the table with my host sister and me when we got up because she didn't want us to eat alone! As an American who always ate breakfast alone, I thought this was crazy, but it's a priority for them that you eat meals together, as a family. Other than the three meals a day, snacking was rare: an occasional yogurt here and there and on Sundays we had Coffee and Cake around 3 or 4.
Somehow, I can't help but think a culture that values grabbing a pastry and coffee from Starbucks on the drive to work and then snacking all morning because the pastry didn't give you the nutrients you needed, then a microwaved frozen meal followed by more snacking followed by fast food over eating an actual good meal with family is sick.
Well, when I was eating all the time, I didn't have time to eat. If I'd gotten up at 5 am to make breakfast, etc., then I'd have been down on even more sleep. Right now, ds2 has to be at preschool at 12:30, and one day a week, we go straight from there to dd1's ballet. That means we have breakfast, have an early lunch (have to be finished by about noon to be out the door on time), then get home no earlier than 4:45, to start making dinner. Yes - I could reschedule dd1's ballet, or ds2's dance class...but the available times would all push dinner back. I really don't think a meal at 8:00, another meal at 11:30 and then dinner at 6:30 or 7:00 makes a lot of sense, yk? My kids need a snack in there somewhere.

The culture is sick, but there's space between grabbing a pastry and coffee from Starbucks and sitting down to eat an actual meal with your family. I don't have sit down breakfasts (and have never been able to stomach big meals first thing in the morning, in any case), but I eat a couple of hardboiled eggs, and some fruit and/or yogurt...not a pastry.

Quote:
And about controlling the amount of calories, well really that's the problem. It's damn near impossible and most people don't bother. Aside from the fact that people chronically underestimate their caloric intake, I tried this in college eating "6 small meals a day" and religiously measured everything I stuck in my mouth to keep with my calorie range to lose weight. It sucked. I never felt satisfied and eating was a burden. I didn't go over because it was so rigid, but it's no wonder most people can't do this.
Where have you heard that most people can't do this? I know several people who do very well on weight management through six small meals or all day "grazing" eating patterns. They don't track calories or measure...they're just aware of what they put in their mouths. It's not like "6 dates at 10:30, a cracker at 11:10, half a cup of yogurt at noon" - more like "I had those dates, and a cracker...maybe I'll have some yogurt now". Where I think people run into trouble is when they completely forget about the dates and the cracker, and think the yogurt is all they've eaten in three hours.

I'm interested in the talk about the 50s. My mom grew up in the 50s, and while she's never suggested food was everywhere, she certainly snacked. I always had an afterschool snack every day, as did most of my friends, in the early 70s.

There is a lot more snacking going on these days, but I still think the bigger problem is the quality of the snacks. IMO, there's a big difference between some oranges with water to drink (standard snack at my nephew's soccer games), and Fruit by the Foot with Capri Sun or pop, yk?
post #80 of 91
I remember having orange slices and water for snack at soccer games. I remember a friend crying to her dad that she wanted soda in her water bottle and dad was adamant that she have water in her WATER bottle. I still think about this all the time.
I wish fruit lasted long enough for me to take it outside with us. The kids gobble it up at an alarming rate.

However we went to a farm this morning and got about 20 lbs of oranges so at least we will have those for a while- they might even last a whole week if I'm lucky.
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