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IEP's and shortened school days

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Is it possible to get a student a shortened school day? I mean like a 4 hour day instead of the usual 6-7?
post #2 of 22
I know someone who's done that. Her child was fine for about 2 hours in a regular classroom, and hour or so in a special ed room, but then could not handle the stimulation and structure of school anymore.

I don't know how common it is though.
post #3 of 22
It may depend on the school district. I know some places don't get the full funding for a student who doesn't stay for 6 hours (ie checks out a noon for an appt). This might not be common, though, and I have no idea how it would relate to IEP's (my pre-k kid has one, and he only goes 4 days a week 3 hrs a day).

If you are considering putting a homeschooled child into public school definitely see if they have any programs in your area. One of our local elemtary schools has an option for part-time schooling (basically all the extras like PE, Art, music, etc), and anythng academic is done at home.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post
It may depend on the school district. I know some places don't get the full funding for a student who doesn't stay for 6 hours (ie checks out a noon for an appt). This might not be common, though, and I have no idea how it would relate to IEP's (my pre-k kid has one, and he only goes 4 days a week 3 hrs a day).

If you are considering putting a homeschooled child into public school definitely see if they have any programs in your area. One of our local elemtary schools has an option for part-time schooling (basically all the extras like PE, Art, music, etc), and anythng academic is done at home.
Here its all or nothing which really sucks.
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post

If you are considering putting a homeschooled child into public school definitely see if they have any programs in your area. One of our local elemtary schools has an option for part-time schooling (basically all the extras like PE, Art, music, etc), and anythng academic is done at home.
That is what I want!!! Do you know what the official name is for something like that? My son is ready to homeschool (last year! lol) but I'm not sure I can give up the structure it provides fully. Plus my other kids will still be in the school. Is that in your whole state, or just certain schools in certain towns?
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mumm View Post
That is what I want!!! Do you know what the official name is for something like that? My son is ready to homeschool (last year! lol) but I'm not sure I can give up the structure it provides fully. Plus my other kids will still be in the school. Is that in your whole state, or just certain schools in certain towns?
Here it's called the Family School - but I'm honestly not sure how many other districts/schools offer it. We didn't end up doing it, though, as we moved here in the middle of the school year and they had a wait list. Then they built a new school and started a Montessori program which we have been really happy with. What it is here is just a regular elementary school that also has homeschoolers come for part of the day, some days.

We moved from Colorado and I know they had a couple Family School's and part-time options (We almost did one where my DD would have gone to school 2 half days, with the option of adding a 3rd day - but we decided against it as it was too far away), so, I know they are out there. Your specific school may be open to it, you never know - I'd ask and see what they say.
post #7 of 22
Here staying through lunch can count as a full day.

Also ~ if there is a medical reason documented in the IEP (ie in her coding under OHI - Other Health Impairment), a shortened day is absolutely allowed. Part of the IEP process is to decide Placement which gets ranked from least restrictive to most restrictive (in terms of with peers vs not with peers and best for child health wise vs not -- etc) One of them is Home Program which, from what I understand from a friend, is generally for children with medical needs best met in the home. If a child cannot medically handle school for a full day, that would be considered a 'too restrictive' environment and adaptations and alternative placements would be made. And Placement does not have to be 100% in one place. It could be 50/50, 60/40 -- whatever an IEP team decides.

IEPs fall under IDEA Law which is federal so states have to follow anything agreed upon in the IEP.
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
I called the school dist special ed office this morning and they said its not a problem, just need to figure out which angle to come at.
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Satori View Post
I called the school dist special ed office this morning and they said its not a problem, just need to figure out which angle to come at.

yay! I hope it works out well for your family.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Satori View Post
I called the school dist special ed office this morning and they said its not a problem, just need to figure out which angle to come at.
Awesome!! The kids can try school part-time at first so it's not overwhelming and then if it works out, you can add more time if you want.

I'm so glad your district went on-board with that right-off. Some are so hit or miss, YK?
post #11 of 22
Good luck on getting everything in order. I'm glad your school district is on board.

Ours, we could never get a straight answer. First it was: no. then, No, unless you do part-time/dual enrollment. then, part time/dual enrollment is no longer offered for the special-ed kids, and there are no alternatives. Oh, they did say we could think about part-time in his IEP, but the schedule had to be identical M-F. Yah, right. He has morning appointments for therapy on Monday and afternoons on Wednesday. So, that would not work. Finally, after running myself ragged, we ended up just leaving him in full-time school. Our ideal would be to homeschool him for the express purpose of scheduling therapies--but our insurance basically says: "what are you getting from the school district?" and they won't let him attend school just for therapy...it is all or none...and if we go none, our insurance may stop paying for his private therapies.
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post
yay! I hope it works out well for your family.

Me too


Quote:
Originally Posted by fullofgrace View Post
Awesome!! The kids can try school part-time at first so it's not overwhelming and then if it works out, you can add more time if you want.

I'm so glad your district went on-board with that right-off. Some are so hit or miss, YK?
They acted like it wasn't a big deal at all so there's hope. I'm just worried about the immune def side of things. She couldn't handle the rate of infections last time but we've doubled her IG dose since then and she's rarely been sick since. Hoping the higher dose + shorter days might help on that front too.
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2lilsweetfoxes View Post
Good luck on getting everything in order. I'm glad your school district is on board.

Ours, we could never get a straight answer. First it was: no. then, No, unless you do part-time/dual enrollment. then, part time/dual enrollment is no longer offered for the special-ed kids, and there are no alternatives. Oh, they did say we could think about part-time in his IEP, but the schedule had to be identical M-F. Yah, right. He has morning appointments for therapy on Monday and afternoons on Wednesday. So, that would not work. Finally, after running myself ragged, we ended up just leaving him in full-time school. Our ideal would be to homeschool him for the express purpose of scheduling therapies--but our insurance basically says: "what are you getting from the school district?" and they won't let him attend school just for therapy...it is all or none...and if we go none, our insurance may stop paying for his private therapies.
The district is jerking you around, the law says they have to provide therapy services even to homeschooled kids. Its under FAPE if I remember right, its been a while since I had to look it up. Check with your local Special Needs Family Resource Center, they will know and know how to deal with your local district.
post #14 of 22
Depends on the state. Many states only provide services to help children be successful in a classroom setting. My state is one of those.
post #15 of 22
As part of my DD's 504 Plan based on a medical dx of autism, she has a shortened school day. Legally, she is a school student and not a homeschooler and there are certain requirements the school has to follow to be in line with state requirments, and therefore certain requirments we have at home.

<<Oh, they did say we could think about part-time in his IEP, but the schedule had to be identical M-F. Yah, right. He has morning appointments for therapy on Monday and afternoons on Wednesday. So, that would not work. >>

I know that for certain therapist things have to be scheduled WAY in advance, but I don't see why you couldn't work toward switching things around *if that is what you really wanted to do.*

Having a child in school part time is complete PITA for me, but it is the right thing for my DD.
post #16 of 22
Unless it is absolutely impossible due to the children's health you may find that once they get a taste of school they want to go the whole day. We used to homeschool and switched to school 2 school years ago and my kids really love it. There is no way they would want to go part days because they would know they were missing out on stuff when they left. So unless it is absolutely impossible I would work towards full-days if possible.
post #17 of 22
Definitely. More than half day is considered full time anyway.
post #18 of 22
Absolutely.

We are considering it if one DD does not get in 1/2 day K next fall.

We would start at a 1/2 day in full day K and then lengthen it gradually as she tolerated it (if we could). If is is stated in her IEP, they can not deny it and they will get funding since it is part of her accommodations for her disability.

They dont *routinely* do it, but when I suggested it- they said they could try it (if 1/2 K program is cut and all day is the only option).
post #19 of 22

KC Michigan, I am in Michigan (Ann Arbor) and my son's IEP team refused my request for a shortened school day. He is autistic, has sensory and anxiety issues.  I'm curious about where are you in MI and if you were able to get a shortened day for your DD written into her IEP. Thank you!!

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

As part of my DD's 504 Plan based on a medical dx of autism, she has a shortened school day. Legally, she is a school student and not a homeschooler and there are certain requirements the school has to follow to be in line with state requirments, and therefore certain requirments we have at home.

<<Oh, they did say we could think about part-time in his IEP, but the schedule had to be identical M-F. Yah, right. He has morning appointments for therapy on Monday and afternoons on Wednesday. So, that would not work. >>

I know that for certain therapist things have to be scheduled WAY in advance, but I don't see why you couldn't work toward switching things around *if that is what you really wanted to do.*

Having a child in school part time is complete PITA for me, but it is the right thing for my DD.

Linda on the Move, what state are you in? My son has a medical dx of autism but they are refusing my request for a shortened day. Do the laws differ state by state? I am in MI. Thank you!!

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