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It's June 2010 already! Allergy Chat Thread - Page 9

post #161 of 873
I think it's also important to remember that current research is suggesting that just because you inherit a gene doesn't necessarily mean it will be expressed- that it may require a "trigger". Unfortunately, it seems that our world is becoming increasingly all about triggering these dormant genes.
eta: and thanks for all the ideas.. I just finished nursing ds2 down and now ds3 is nursing. seems to make me slightly less intelligent than normal
post #162 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyalynn View Post
If these gene variants are that rare, so that getting two copies isn't, say, a maybe 5% chance like it may be with 2 copies of the MTHFR variants, then yeah, that's a different ballgame, I agree.

Historically, it's hard to distinguish between sanitation and general nutrition issues and genetic ones, but even when sanitation and general nutrition were only so-so, it does seem some families were hit much harder than most others by illness and early deaths in the family.
Yup. Some things are a lot rarer in her sample than others, and it seems like those are the "tough" ones. And I think homozygous vs. heterozygous really matters as well. Yasko has a slide somewhere, if I can find it, showing the distribution of mutations in her sampled population.

But I agree that I think historical "outside forces" like sanitation and epidemics may have masked some basically poor genetics. 3 of my 4 siblings have active rheumatoid arthritis, my uncle, my grandfather. Guessing that in past times, we wouldn't have known about the family tendency to autoimmune issues, because most wouldn't have survived. My grandfather remembers that his grandparents "lost a lot of children young". On the other side of my family, a lot of women could never get pregnant, or had a lot of miscarriages. Today, with better nutrition and sanitation and medical care (and less long hours working in the fields!), maybe they carry some of those babies to term. Hard to know.

ETA: Tanya, found the slides. For mthfr mutations, Yasko's population is 11% homozygous for both C677T and A1298C (normal pop is 5-10%). Heterozygous is almost 45% in her population (that's definitely higher than normal, I've found estimates of 15-30% for the general population).
post #163 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post

And your relatives are nuts - you can be related to me any time you like!!! I will give you the honor and glory you so deserve


Yes, Deb & I can be your long lost sisters. When are we having a family retreat?

Yeah, I think many of celiac symptoms are secondary issues from malabsorption/inflammation. I've tried various things for DH and DD for the KP and cradle cap - cal, mag, K2, EFA, biotin, B6 - nothing seemed to impact either of them at all. The cradle cap, it's hard to tell though - like you say, it shows up, and then sticks around for a long time - so I'm not sure I'd know for sure if it got "better" in terms of the underlying cause.


Man, do you have my daughter's twin??? That sensory stuff on the hair brushing - argh. And you're off gluten, aren't you? Hmmm.

We are off gluten, dairy, soy (mostly), corn (mostly). Her reaction is always the same. My husband and I have to flip a coin to see who gets the *honor* of brushing her hair.

That's a LOT of money. His basic approach isn't all that different from Dr. Yasko's, fwiw (without the genetics component, obviously).
Well what I like about him is he tests for all sorts of things I'm too dumb to figure out on my own. Like how my methylation is and stuff like that. And he tells you what you need to take to fix it. I might be able to get that from the Yasko stuff but it would be a heck of a lot more work.

I'm going back to see the functional medicine doctor on Tuesday. I'll get the results of my latest stool test but I'm also going to ask him about the Yasko gene test & the urine testing to see what he thinks. I went ahead and ordered the Yasko test last night so we'll see how that goes.
post #164 of 873
Jane - I meant all the info that has been coming out in the media about toxicity and gmos and just food quality. Not the in depth stuff we talk about. But I get sick of people looking at me like I am wackado because I talk about plastics and gmos and stuff.

Hey, my body temp. is always 97.3 - and I don't get a fever when I'm sick. I almost died as a baby because nobody believed I was sick because no fever - but I had double pneumonia and went temporarily deaf. In high school I fought for months to get people to believe I was sick - and then the strep throat I had went all in my blood and I was temporarily paralyzed. It kind of sucked to because I got sent to school when I was really and truly sick just because I didn't have a fever.

I have a question about autoimmunie disorders - I tested positive for ana in my second pregnancy, which I lost. I don't think they tested again for my Scout. But if I have ana and am pregnant with her, is she likely to have autoimmune too?

I also have a question about midline defects - Scout has a bright red line going right up where her butt cheeks are up to her spine. Is this a midline defect?

Karen
post #165 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by chlobo View Post
Well what I like about him is he tests for all sorts of things I'm too dumb to figure out on my own. Like how my methylation is and stuff like that. And he tells you what you need to take to fix it. I might be able to get that from the Yasko stuff but it would be a heck of a lot more work.

I'm going back to see the functional medicine doctor on Tuesday. I'll get the results of my latest stool test but I'm also going to ask him about the Yasko gene test & the urine testing to see what he thinks. I went ahead and ordered the Yasko test last night so we'll see how that goes.
There is a Dr. Mullan in California that does phone consults with some people about the Yasko protocol. People seem to really like her. So if you want, that could be an option to get some knowledgeable support.

And honestly, with the new compounded supps that Dr. Yasko has put together, getting on the program (especially if you are willing to spend money and test frequently) is very easy. You will get a list of supps to take, tailored to your mutations, when you get your genetics results. I am happy to help with the first steps (what supps can you start now, what urine tests should you do, and then what order to add the supps when you get your genetics).

Once you get your genetics, and add in the appropriate supps, then you can do the amino acids & metabolic analysis profile pee tests to see how you're doing. If you want a good read on how you're methylating now, and several other issues, you can run those two tests as a baseline as well. If you run the pee tests through Dr. Yasko, you get her comments on the tests (she's very specific - tweak this supp, that one, etc). She will also recommend additional tests you might want to do, like a CSA or whatever. Then you could add Dr. Mullan in if you wanted more advice or help interpreting what is going on - she will work with tests ordered through Dr. Yasko.

I will warn you, it seems like the part of Dr. Yasko's protocol most people hear about is her RNA formulas. She has these custom RNA formulas that are supposed to be specific to certain mutations/health conditions/behaviors. How they work is all a big secret (I think in part because it's not well understood). I believe it is quite a bit like homeopathy - just because we can't prove how it works doesn't mean it doesn't work. Lots of people on her forums report excellent results with the RNAs. We tried a couple, didn't see anything, so I don't use them (they're very expensive). But for a lot of people, that puts her in the same category as witch doctors. Most aren't as familiar with the "supplement for your particular genetics, and then do lots of testing to track progress" part of her program, which I think is one of the smartest, most well researched & clinically tested approaches to my kid's issues I've ever tried.
post #166 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
There is a Dr. Mullan in California that does phone consults with some people about the Yasko protocol. People seem to really like her. So if you want, that could be an option to get some knowledgeable support.

And honestly, with the new compounded supps that Dr. Yasko has put together, getting on the program (especially if you are willing to spend money and test frequently) is very easy. You will get a list of supps to take, tailored to your mutations, when you get your genetics results. I am happy to help with the first steps (what supps can you start now, what urine tests should you do, and then what order to add the supps when you get your genetics).

Once you get your genetics, and add in the appropriate supps, then you can do the amino acids & metabolic analysis profile pee tests to see how you're doing. If you want a good read on how you're methylating now, and several other issues, you can run those two tests as a baseline as well. If you run the pee tests through Dr. Yasko, you get her comments on the tests (she's very specific - tweak this supp, that one, etc). She will also recommend additional tests you might want to do, like a CSA or whatever. Then you could add Dr. Mullan in if you wanted more advice or help interpreting what is going on - she will work with tests ordered through Dr. Yasko.

I will warn you, it seems like the part of Dr. Yasko's protocol most people hear about is her RNA formulas. She has these custom RNA formulas that are supposed to be specific to certain mutations/health conditions/behaviors. How they work is all a big secret (I think in part because it's not well understood). I believe it is quite a bit like homeopathy - just because we can't prove how it works doesn't mean it doesn't work. Lots of people on her forums report excellent results with the RNAs. We tried a couple, didn't see anything, so I don't use them (they're very expensive). But for a lot of people, that puts her in the same category as witch doctors. Most aren't as familiar with the "supplement for your particular genetics, and then do lots of testing to track progress" part of her program, which I think is one of the smartest, most well researched & clinically tested approaches to my kid's issues I've ever tried.
Thanks for the offer to help. I had booked an appointment with the guy in Mass. but then cancelled it and then later opted for the functional medicine MD. So I'll start with that and my Yasko results and see how it goes. How long after I take the test does it take to get results? She's just up the road from me in ME, isn't she?
post #167 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
Yup. Some things are a lot rarer in her sample than others, and it seems like those are the "tough" ones. And I think homozygous vs. heterozygous really matters as well. Yasko has a slide somewhere, if I can find it, showing the distribution of mutations in her sampled population.

Along the lines of what JR was saying, I wonder if homeopathy, done well, could help influence _how_ expressed some of these genes are. I mean--I don't know how to figure out the difference between, say, an MTHFR gene, which I think is just there, it is what it is, and the epigenetic turning on/off of other genes. How do we know which genes are which? That part's confusing, and probably not something you need to decide on yet, I figure I've got more work to do before I get too worried about stuff like that (and I think nourishing the kids properly does a lot, in an epigenetic on/off sense to help promote the healthiest gene expression I can get).

ETA: Tanya, found the slides. For mthfr mutations, Yasko's population is 11% homozygous for both C677T and A1298C (normal pop is 5-10%). Heterozygous is almost 45% in her population (that's definitely higher than normal, I've found estimates of 15-30% for the general population).
That's really interesting. I thought I'd read ranges of hetero mthfr from as low as maybe 20% to as high as 50%... huh, I wonder why the difference. But that's still not hugely off from the general population, whereas I'd think that her population of people would be significantly different, health-wise, than average. Maybe people end up with Yasko after they've already tried other things and their results weren't great? And maybe it's easier to figure out folate, try more for mthfr, than the other stuff?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rileyscoutmom View Post
Hey, my body temp. is always 97.3 - and I don't get a fever when I'm sick. I almost died as a baby because nobody believed I was sick because no fever - but I had double pneumonia and went temporarily deaf. In high school I fought for months to get people to believe I was sick - and then the strep throat I had went all in my blood and I was temporarily paralyzed. It kind of sucked to because I got sent to school when I was really and truly sick just because I didn't have a fever.

You know the chronic strep thing is something to investigate for the kids? Some kids get chronic stuff from mom, early on my HCP asked me about epstein-barre, and I'm considering something like that for DS (no idea about DD, sometimes it's hard to figure out what's the same and what's not with them).

I have a question about autoimmunie disorders - I tested positive for ana in my second pregnancy, which I lost. I don't think they tested again for my Scout. But if I have ana and am pregnant with her, is she likely to have autoimmune too?

I'd guess, just being your child, she has a tendency,b but this is the stuff where I think we can often make an impact by problem-solving, trying new stuff, basic stuff like gluten-free seems important. But continuing to work the problems you're seeing, that seems the best you can do now.

I also have a question about midline defects - Scout has a bright red line going right up where her butt cheeks are up to her spine. Is this a midline defect?

Karen
I'm not sure it's a midline defect, but it sounds like a midline something. But I'm not sure it tells you much you don't already know.

Do you think she'd hold still for acupuncture? And be able to take herbs--ugh, they mostly taste bad, and she's really too little to swallow pills. Hmm... acupuncture's cool, but it sorta seems that when things are tricky and multi-faceted, all those appointments get expensive. Then again, the whole thing is expensive anyway.
post #168 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineR View Post
CS. It always brightens my day to "see" you.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
Mostly I'm just cranky, because I'm so done with food being an issue, but I feel like I can't really ignore that my 6yo only weighs 35lbs. Sigh.

Playdough is fun (here's a GF one, it uses corn, but I bet any starch would do OK).


I'm going to have to try using quinoa for playdough. We went to the Green Festival yesterday, and there were a few kids activities that looked really fun, but too much risk of xcon (even making "rainsticks" had a mix with rice in it.) And there was a booth with some gf playdough, but it was made with sorghum, which I know DD reacts to. (Sorry- I totally should have paid attention to the brand on that for you guys! )

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
Hmm. I was just about to make DH go out for tTG blood test for celiac (the full celiac panel does more than that, but this one is cheap, and 90% accurate on it's own). Then I found this http://celiachometest.com/, it's a site in Canada that offers a celiac home test (it's basically the pregnancy test version of a tTG blood test, using a finger prick, results in 10 minutes at home. Looks like it's basically the same 90% accurate in predicting if you have celiac). You can get one shipped to the US (for personal use, they're still waiting for FDA approval), according to a blog I read. I think I'll be having my brother go shopping for me (looks like you can buy it at several Canadian drugstores).
Very cool! And cheap! Wish we would have found this a couple months ago...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyalynn View Post
You know the chronic strep thing is something to investigate for the kids? Some kids get chronic stuff from mom, early on my HCP asked me about epstein-barre, and I'm considering something like that for DS (no idea about DD, sometimes it's hard to figure out what's the same and what's not with them).
Tell me more about the chronic strep thing. I had strep probably about 30 times growing up. One year I had it 5 times I think.
post #169 of 873
It seems like various illnesses, I think both viral and bacterial, sometimes aren't cleared from our bodies appropriately, and our kids can be infected by growing in us. PANDAS is one, it's an acronym for the strep one, but epstein-barre is another, I think there are at least a few other well-known ones, but I think sometimes it's just lots of nameless viruses and bacteria.

I've read of kids both who get sick with everything, and who barely/never get sick, having this as part of what's going on. I assume that mom not dealing with the bacteria or virus appropriately means something's odd with mom's health, and therefore with kiddo's as well, so I'd bet there are different things intertwined together in each case. Stuff like that is talked about in ASD circles, I've barely read anything about it, I think I am going to start reading more.

http://www.adhd.com.au/PANDAS.htm

Here's one take on the topic.
post #170 of 873
mamafish, could you give me some pointers if I want to read about using anti-viral products? I've not stepped outside my comfy little world of strictly metals/nutrients for quite a while, but I think it's time, I'm just not sure where to go to start getting a feel for the lay of the land.

Have you used anti-viral products, or anything along these lines? Did you say you had in one of your recent posts?
post #171 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by chlobo View Post
Thanks for the offer to help. I had booked an appointment with the guy in Mass. but then cancelled it and then later opted for the functional medicine MD. So I'll start with that and my Yasko results and see how it goes. How long after I take the test does it take to get results? She's just up the road from me in ME, isn't she?
6-8 weeks, usually. We got ours in 6.5. That's part of why she has the step 1 & basic methylation for everyone lists, so you can get started on those parts while you wait for your genetics. She also says you can work on dealing with gut stuff - are you waiting for a new set of stool test results?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyalynn View Post
That's really interesting. I thought I'd read ranges of hetero mthfr from as low as maybe 20% to as high as 50%... huh, I wonder why the difference. But that's still not hugely off from the general population, whereas I'd think that her population of people would be significantly different, health-wise, than average. Maybe people end up with Yasko after they've already tried other things and their results weren't great? And maybe it's easier to figure out folate, try more for mthfr, than the other stuff?
On mthfr - Yasko is 45% heterozygous for each of the two mutations, so I'd guess a lot more than 45% have at least one mthfr mutation (but I don't know how many). I know DS is fairly unusual in not having any mthfr mutations.

She doesn't really consider mthfr one of the tougher mutations, unless you are homozygous for A1298C (in which case the issue is more how it impacts BH4, not folate).

Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyalynn View Post
It seems like various illnesses, I think both viral and bacterial, sometimes aren't cleared from our bodies appropriately, and our kids can be infected by growing in us. PANDAS is one, it's an acronym for the strep one, but epstein-barre is another, I think there are at least a few other well-known ones, but I think sometimes it's just lots of nameless viruses and bacteria.
Yasko has a ton of stuff on this, Tanya. In her presentations, and there's plenty of info in the forum as well (there's one devoted to viral issues), and a whole list of antiviral supps she recommends.

However, her basic position is that first you get methylation working, because that is the first line of defense against viruses (sticking a methyl group on foreign DNA is one of the primary ways our body turns off viruses, instead of ending up with chronic viral load.

She also believes we are all exposed to these viruses all the time, so it doesn't have to be maternal transmission.

Quote:
Originally Posted by changingseasons View Post
Tell me more about the chronic strep thing. I had strep probably about 30 times growing up. One year I had it 5 times I think.
I'm kind of ignorant on it. Have you done a CSA? Sometimes you can see your strep load there (but not always).

Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyalynn View Post
mamafish, could you give me some pointers if I want to read about using anti-viral products? I've not stepped outside my comfy little world of strictly metals/nutrients for quite a while, but I think it's time, I'm just not sure where to go to start getting a feel for the lay of the land.

Have you used anti-viral products, or anything along these lines? Did you say you had in one of your recent posts?
We're seeing viral die off as we improve methylation. In particular, I think adding NADH caused a big viral reaction (when I went to fast we got funky rash all over, never seen anything like it).

As I said above, lots of reading in the Yasko forums on viral issues, it's a big piece of what she looks to address (but as a second step, after getting methylation functional).

In terms of gene expression, there's lots of genes that may or may not be turned on in our lifetimes. The panel Yasko runs, though, she's very focused in on particular genes that are core to methylation or related processes - so they are very much turned on. You'd be dead if they weren't.
post #172 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
On mthfr - Yasko is 45% heterozygous for each of the two mutations, so I'd guess a lot more than 45% have at least one mthfr mutation (but I don't know how many). I know DS is fairly unusual in not having any mthfr mutations.

Oh, 45% for each, not total, got it.

Yasko has a ton of stuff on this, Tanya. In her presentations, and there's plenty of info in the forum as well (there's one devoted to viral issues), and a whole list of antiviral supps she recommends.

I will go read, then. I think it's time to learn more.

However, her basic position is that first you get methylation working, because that is the first line of defense against viruses (sticking a methyl group on foreign DNA is one of the primary ways our body turns off viruses, instead of ending up with chronic viral load.

I need to read her stuff more, see if I think I can make some educated guesses. I'd rather not run a $500 test, we're on the healthier end of all this so I'd expect most things to come back with the most common, easiest gene variants. Maybe I can make educated guesses, do some trial-and-error and see how things go. More B12 doesn't seem like a problem, she may recommend everyone take more than the 2000 mcg I'm giving now. Must learn more.

She also believes we are all exposed to these viruses all the time, so it doesn't have to be maternal transmission.

That's been one of the things I haven't really understood. I can't think of any illness that's really stuck around with me, or a time after an illness where things were just off. But seriously, the kid was sick a LOT when he was little, really not in the best place to fight stuff off.

We're seeing viral die off as we improve methylation. In particular, I think adding NADH caused a big viral reaction (when I went to fast we got funky rash all over, never seen anything like it).

As I said above, lots of reading in the Yasko forums on viral issues, it's a big piece of what she looks to address (but as a second step, after getting methylation functional).

In terms of gene expression, there's lots of genes that may or may not be turned on in our lifetimes. The panel Yasko runs, though, she's very focused in on particular genes that are core to methylation or related processes - so they are very much turned on. You'd be dead if they weren't.
Everything else I wrote is purple. Huh.

Wish me luck having the willpower to go out and work in the yard in the heat and humidity tomorrow. It's only supposed to get up to 90F tomorrow, the morning should be ok. And wow, our flower beds need weeding and a thick new layer of mulch.

Thanks for the leads on where to read. I feel like I'm stepping into new, uncharted territory.
post #173 of 873
You don't need to get the illness to have a viral load from it. One big source of viral load (according to Yasko) is live vaccines. You can get titers of measles and rubella virus in ASD kids, even though they've never had measles or rubella. Same for strep, or herpes, and others. What you have is a body that can't turn off the low level infection, even if it isn't an active outbreak (or never was).

I was not happy to think that my kid is a walking virus factory! She says that anyone with these illnesses, or who has just been vaccinated, is "shedding" virus everywhere they go, so kids can be easily exposed.
post #174 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
You don't need to get the illness to have a viral load from it. One big source of viral load (according to Yasko) is live vaccines. You can get titers of measles and rubella virus in ASD kids, even though they've never had measles or rubella. Same for strep, or herpes, and others. What you have is a body that can't turn off the low level infection, even if it isn't an active outbreak (or never was).

I was not happy to think that my kid is a walking virus factory! She says that anyone with these illnesses, or who has just been vaccinated, is "shedding" virus everywhere they go, so kids can be easily exposed.
Oh. Oh my. Cause I don't think DS has ever dealt with illnesses particularly well, I threw enough nutrients at him that he didn't get seriously ill, but it's not really the same as properly responding to an illness... wonder what's lurking?

I hope I can get lots of research time in while we're on vacation, maybe we can come home at the end of the summer and I'll know what to do.
post #175 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyalynn View Post
Oh. Oh my. Cause I don't think DS has ever dealt with illnesses particularly well, I threw enough nutrients at him that he didn't get seriously ill, but it's not really the same as properly responding to an illness... wonder what's lurking?

I hope I can get lots of research time in while we're on vacation, maybe we can come home at the end of the summer and I'll know what to do.
Yeah, welcome to my biggest "....oh, shit...." moment when learning the Yasko stuff. However, I've been so impressed with how he is dealing with whooping cough now that his methylation is working better (and your kids are probably easier to get "moving" than he was). So I suspect his body will deal reasonably easily now with all the stored up garbage - it's not a big strain IF methylation is working (there are a few exceptions, like strep, that people seem to find very stubborn, and Yasko has special protocols for).

The challenge is just to get methylation going smoothly enough. This is actually one place again where I approached things differently than Yasko recommends. She talks about layering in support, one supp at a time, moving slowly. Makes sense, so you can see what each one does. However, I figured that if you were thinking about methylation as a cycle, and if you have 4-5 mutations on the cycle, you kind of want to try to get them all moving together. Otherwise you get one part of the cycle moving and get a logjam somewhere else (or see no impact, because the cycle is still stuck). So what I did was:

1) put in the step 1 supportive supps
2) put in the pancreatic/digestive supps suggested by his genetics (I was already bringing those onboard before I got his results, since he had reacted so strongly to the digestive enzymes that were part of step 1)
3) put in all the methylation cycle related supps all at once, but at very low doses for all. Then I've been slowly increasing amounts across the board.

With this approach, I don't really know what had which impact. But, with her new compounded supps, I don't think you really know that anyhow. I figured there wasn't much difference between adding a compounded supp with 15 ingredients and adding 6 different supps with 30 ingredients. I also trust the zeolite we have on board to take care of any released metals, so I'm not too worried about mobilizing stuff at this point. As a result, I think DS is up to speed a lot faster than most people on her program, with less pain than most folks seem to report.

Guessing you could take a similar approach with your son. Get the pancreatic stuff in place, and take a look at her step 1 supports, see if anything jumps out as missing. Then do her basic methylation supports (which include all the right folate forms), and B12 - her basic dose would be 3-5mg, and then work up from there if you still aren't seeing "good" methylation.

If you want to do a test for your son at some point, I'd do the metabolic analysis profile over the genetics, and I'd do it after you have basic methylation cycle supports and 5mg or so of B12 in place. That's the one with most of the methylation cycle markers, and also kreb's cycle markers. It tells you if you need more B12, more folate, more krebs/mito supports. With the coupon I posted in the main chat thread, it would be $240 through directlabs. Guessing that would get you more actionable info than anything else. The urine amino acids test (the other main test Yasko uses) is more about the digestive & cbs related mutations, and I think those ones are easier to work out through trial and error.
post #176 of 873
I have this nagging suspicion... I'm fine on methylation, and doubt any chronic viral stuff, but chronic bacteria. If I could wrap my head around where these bacteria are hanging out, it sounds like I definitely would fall under that category. Lots of strep throat in elementary school, lots of abx in high school, rare for me to get sick in/post college, start enzymes, see aluminum die off which is associated with chronic bacteria, and then get mastitis out of the blue in a totally empty breast. Could the mastitis have been me stirring up bacteria with the enzymes??
post #177 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoMe View Post
I have this nagging suspicion... I'm fine on methylation, and doubt any chronic viral stuff, but chronic bacteria. If I could wrap my head around where these bacteria are hanging out, it sounds like I definitely would fall under that category. Lots of strep throat in elementary school, lots of abx in high school, rare for me to get sick in/post college, start enzymes, see aluminum die off which is associated with chronic bacteria, and then get mastitis out of the blue in a totally empty breast. Could the mastitis have been me stirring up bacteria with the enzymes??
Shannon, do you have any of the MTRR mutations - can you tell on your 23andme genetics? Reason I'm asking is that high B12 need and chronic bacterial stuff often seem to travel together. However, better guess is that you are low on BH4 - it's drained by chronic bacteria, by ammonia (you eat enough protein that might be an issue), CBS+, NOS+ and A1298C+. Yasko tends to suggest a serious look at prescription BH4 for anyone with 2 out of those 4 issues (by prescription she means taking 1mg or so a day, very low dose for the prescription level - and there's a backdoor way to acquire). That has been kicking DS' butt, biggest detox since the digestive enzymes.

Anyhow, mastitis can be caused by staph, which is often seen in chronic bacteria issues - so yeah, maybe related. Ugh!
post #178 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
I'm kind of ignorant on it. Have you done a CSA? Sometimes you can see your strep load there (but not always).
Ok, the only CSA I know about is community supported agriculture, but I'm pretty sure that's not what you're talking about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
I was not happy to think that my kid is a walking virus factory! She says that anyone with these illnesses, or who has just been vaccinated, is "shedding" virus everywhere they go, so kids can be easily exposed.
Like permanently?!
post #179 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by changingseasons View Post
Ok, the only CSA I know about is community supported agriculture, but I'm pretty sure that's not what you're talking about.

Like permanently?!
CSA = comprehensive stool analysis

And no, I think vaccinated people shed lots of virus for the few days after they are vaccinated, not sure on the particulars. But yeah, ewww.
post #180 of 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
CSA = comprehensive stool analysis

And no, I think vaccinated people shed lots of virus for the few days after they are vaccinated, not sure on the particulars. But yeah, ewww.


I did some sort of stool test for the regular doc a while back.... nothing came back unusual, but I'm not sure how comprehensive it was.
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