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avoiding food during first few weeks=less like to develop intolerances?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
After having two dairy & egg (among other things) intolerant kids, I'd really like to avoid at least an egg intolerance for the third. I'm wondering if I avoid eggs for the first few weeks or months of baby's life if she will be less likely to develop an egg intolerance.
post #2 of 18
You know, I'm not sure. I think there is so much involved besides exposure.

That said, I am six months pregnant right now, I will not be eating any of my own known food reactions, or any of the other major ones my boys have, for at least the first 4 months.

Hmm. maybe I am already sidestepping. I am eating butter and it has been good for me, so not sure about that.

I've curious what others have to say.
post #3 of 18
Well, unless you're avoiding those foods during your entire pregnancy as well, your baby has already had exposure.

If you did want to completely avoid, I would avoid during pregnancy and during the first 6 months, until baby's gut has a chance to close.

Studies on this are still pretty controversial though- some say strict avoidance to avoid food allergies, and some recent studies show that early (small) exposure is good to build up the immune system.
post #4 of 18
Studies on this are still pretty controversial though- some say strict avoidance to avoid food allergies, and some recent studies show that early (small) exposure is good to build up the immune system.[/QUOTE]

This is what I was told as well. Two allergists told me to eat what I wanted during my pregnancy with DC2. I still avoided major allergenic foods my last trimester (b/c it just seemed to make more sense to start the new babe out with "clean" milk) and for the first several months after DDs birth. So far the only thing she seems to be allergic to is eggs (although we haven't tried peanut and she has had very little dairy to this point).
post #5 of 18
Ds had tons of gut issues and food intolerances. I ate tons of eggs and dairy while pregnant. He was intolerant of dairy, but not eggs.

Kefir in infancy has been shown to decrease IgE allergies in babies. Not sure about IgG. The anti-allergenic properties of milk kefir

also check prenatal allergy prevention, nutrition-style and Preconception care: Mineral Deficiency Test

And Donna Gates' How, Why, and When to Introduce Babies to Probiotics


Pat
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by changingseasons View Post
Well, unless you're avoiding those foods during your entire pregnancy as well, your baby has already had exposure.
Didn't read the other replies, but wanted to say this. I am sure my dd was reacting while in utero. She was so active to the point of wearing me out. My other 2 (who don't seem to have any allergies) weren't like that at all. So, even before she was born she was uncomfortable
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
Well I guess I won't worry about it too much then because I'm not avoiding eggs for the rest of my pregnancy. I'll just try not to eat them every day once baby's born and see if that seems to make any difference as my kids (or my DD at least) seem prone to start reacting to foods that are a staple and eaten every day or nearly every day.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Therese's Mommy View Post
I am sure my dd was reacting while in utero. She was so active to the point of wearing me out. My other 2 (who don't seem to have any allergies) weren't like that at all. So, even before she was born she was uncomfortable
I'm not sure I've read about immune complexes crossing the placenta? It would be very interesting to study mama's who were producing IgG antibodies for example.

Was it Doris Rapp that suggested to take your pulse to see if you were allergic to a food? That supposedly your heart rate would increase if you ate a food you were allergic/intolerant to.
post #9 of 18
Oh, and the only other thing I remember about this issue is that the food proteins stick around the mother's body for a long time... a few weeks or even months is not going to do squat. Insider posted about it in the "How Not to Have an Allergic Child" thread.

The only prevention I've heard discussed with some authority as far as setting up the GALT, BALT and MALT immune systems is the bifido dominant infant gut.
post #10 of 18
Just ran across this on a site new to me. Probiotic Bacteria During Pregnancy-Reduces Risk of Allergy in the Child (I can not locate the actual study or abstract, however).

http://blogs.knowthecause.com/Home/t...the-Child.aspx


Pat
post #11 of 18
Pat,
That study is here probably sponsored by Culturelle as that is L. Rhamnosus GG
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/j...TRY=1&SRETRY=0

Pharmax's large Neonate trial concludes this year. Ongoing reports have been good so I'm looking forward to final results!
post #12 of 18
Jane - are you suggesting that I should be taking the neonate before the baby is born?
post #13 of 18
No. I would be taking an appropriate adult version, such as Intensive, Mindlinx or High Potency depending on the issues of the mother.

The Neonate is for the babes themselves. The study parameters I mentioned above are the test group being given it first 6 months of life, with a control group not getting it. 3,000 babies total. And then they are following them 5 years out and evaluating for allergies, asthma, gastrointestinal ailments, and immune system health.
post #14 of 18
I have a very allergic DS and did no "gut" stuff when pregnant. I did probiotics with DD and she was intolerant to egg and dairy till about a year or so (though we still haven't given her either. I am too scared ) I would 100% suggest a probiotic to ANY Mom, esp. if she has other kids who are allergic. May help and will NOT hurt so...
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
I guess I'll get some Neonate for the baby before she comes. It's not any more expensive than the Solaray BabyLife I've given my other two...not that it did them any good! Maybe I should get some Neonate for my 18 month old too. He hasn't had as many food issues as my DD, just food chemicals and eggs and dairy, but now he's developed an intolerance to something else (I'm thinking it's Sunbutter) so obviously there's something not working right for him.

JaneS--do you have any idea if the Pharmax High Potency or Mindlinx is better than VSL3? That's what I take sort of intermittently (like once or twice a week since it's so expensive). I do some water kefir too now that I don't have any milk and don't have to worry about the amines for DS, but I've never noticed any particularly benefits from water kefir. I still have digestive issues off and on.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
I guess I'll get some Neonate for the baby before she comes. It's not any more expensive than the Solaray BabyLife I've given my other two...not that it did them any good! Maybe I should get some Neonate for my 18 month old too. He hasn't had as many food issues as my DD, just food chemicals and eggs and dairy, but now he's developed an intolerance to something else (I'm thinking it's Sunbutter) so obviously there's something not working right for him.
Sunbutter would be high in food chemicals? Or I'm thinking high heat roasting process adds acrylamides? For example, my DS can do white potatoes every day but not potato chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
JaneS--do you have any idea if the Pharmax High Potency or Mindlinx is better than VSL3? That's what I take sort of intermittently (like once or twice a week since it's so expensive). I do some water kefir too now that I don't have any milk and don't have to worry about the amines for DS, but I've never noticed any particularly benefits from water kefir. I still have digestive issues off and on.
I noticed zilch from water kefir grains too.

First, I think would compare VSL3 to the Intensive or Mindlinx. High Potency (8 billion + 50% more at manufacture + FOS) contains less count than the Intensive (24 billion + 50% more at manufacture + no FOS). FOS may be really helpful for some and bad for others.

Mindlinx (2 doses per day total: 16 billion + 50% more at manufacture + no FOS in caps, FOS in powder formula + 500mg glutamine) has the special gluten & casein degrading strains L. crispatus and L. rhamnosus so it's kinda in a class by itself.

Also the L. crispatus has been well studied for vaginal health and L. rhamnosus has multiple benefits:
http://www.probiotic.org/lactobacillus-rhamnosus.htm

VSL3 has dairy, right? Pharmax is grown on agar. The powders have apricot added for flavor, others no fillers.

I can't say for sure re: comparison of Pharmax products to VSL3 since I've never tried the latter (surprisingly!) Obviously the count numbers in the hundreds of billions so that is indeed different.

But from what I understand, the specific strains make a huge difference as far as 1) survival through the stomach acid, and 2) ability to attach to epithelial cells including intestine, urinary or vaginal. That is why it is thought that taking a higher count of a lower ability to survive or attach type of probiotic is necessary. I really don't know for sure how to compare them in that instance b/c I don't know the data on surviving or attaching for VSL3 or even how to compare them!

Pharmax says that their strains being human strains are recognized as self by the body. We've certainly seen that in this house. I don't know about VSL strain origin do you have that info?

Both VSL and the Pharmax intensive have clinical effectiveness proven in studies too. http://www.vsl3.com/research.asp

The Intestive did the Sheffield IBS trial and two Addenbrooks trials showing recovery from antibiotic use.

Quote:
Trial 1: Staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococci
Undertaken at Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, U.K.
Aim: Reduction in post-antibiotic re-growth of potentially pathogenic facultative microorganisms
Results: HLC Intensive significantly prevented post antibiotic increase in Staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococci. These microorganisms are associated with post-antibiotic infection and overgrowth as well as the acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance.

Trial 2: Clostridium difficile in hospitalized patients
Undertaken at Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, U.K.
Aim: Prevention of post-antibiotic overgrowth of Clostridium difficile in hospitalized patients
Results: HLC Intensive lowered frequency of Clostridium difficile infection and overgrowth to the extent that justified its use in all hospitalized patients undertaking antibiotic therapy.
The detailed clinical research section is in the "CLICK HERE" link here:
http://www.rockwellnutrition.com/HLC...3.html?affid=6
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
Sunbutter would be high in food chemicals? Or I'm thinking high heat roasting process adds acrylamides? For example, my DS can do white potatoes every day but not potato chips.
Sunbutter should be pretty low in food chemicals as sunflower seeds are pretty low in salicylates. He's fine with potato chips (which we eat way too many of these days) so I don't think it's acrylamides. It's hard to figure stuff out with him as he's super active and a climber and thinks his main purpose in life is to eat anything he can get his hands on, so he generally gets a bit of egg (sticks his finger in my raw egg smoothie or deviled eggs) every day and a bit of regular bread from something DH has left out, or he fishes stuff out of the garbage, or steals food from the kids at the playground



Quote:
VSL3 has dairy, right? Pharmax is grown on agar. The powders have apricot added for flavor, others no fillers.

Pharmax says that their strains being human strains are recognized as self by the body. We've certainly seen that in this house. I don't know about VSL strain origin do you have that info?
I don't know about the VSL3 and dairy...trace anything doesn't cause issues that I've seen so it doesn't really matter here.

I haven't seen any strain info for VSL3. I know it's worked well for me in the past and maybe I wouldn't have any more digestive issues if I could afford to keep taking one or two every day, but it's too expensive. The Pharmax stuff isn't much different in price though. Guess I'll try culturing some VSL3 in cashew milk yogurt and see if I notice any different eating that every day, and if not when my bottle runs out I might try the Mindlinx.
post #18 of 18
Well certainly try to stick with what works!!

Mentioning trace amounts brings up a thought I don't think I've seen discussed anywhere ... I wonder if it's possible if you are dairy allergic/intolerant to not welcome dairy grown probiotics so well into the gut flora (attach to cells) even though the actual ingredient amount is at trace levels?

I feel like there is so much that we don't know.
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