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Need Help: Collecting "Pet Names" From Other Languages

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

I'm trying to write my son a short story for his first birthday. The concept is based around exploring baby "pet names" from other languages/cultures. For instance, my husband is Chinese and his parents call the baby "Little Treasure" in Mandarin. I thought it would be sweet to include similar types of references from around the world... but need to solicit some help

I'd really appreciate any help you guys can offer, in any language! Just need the pet name spelled out in the original language (anglicized if possible) and then the translation. If you'd like also, I can post the finished document when complete!

Thanks so much for your help!!
post #2 of 21
Some very common ones --
Brazilian Portuguese: Filhinho [fee-LEE-nyo] (little son)
Spanish: Mijo [MEE-ho] (my son)
Also "Querido" in both languages (beloved)
post #3 of 21
Beloved is pretty much universal in Arabic as well ... habibi / habibti (masculine / feminine forms).
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much for your responses, this is exactly what I was looking for! Appreciate it!!
post #5 of 21
Tamil (south India)

Chellam - little sweetie
Vairum - diamond
Puttu - silk
Tungam - gold
post #6 of 21
Italian:

piccino/a: little one
angioletto: little angel
bambola/bambolina: doll, little doll (usually only for girls, but I swear I've heard bambolotto for a boy baby at least once)
stella/stellina: star, little star (I've only heard this one for girls)
amore: love
tesoro/tesoruccio: treasure/little treasure
post #7 of 21
Mija/mijita/mijo/mijito- my daughter/my little daughter/my son...
La gorda/el gordo- the fat one (very common, even if not really very chubby)
La flaca/el flaco- skinny one (see above)
Chaparrita- shorty (girls)
Adjective or noun + ita/ito/illa/illo (ex. chiquita- little girl, güerita- little white girl) = endearment

j is pronounced like h, ll pronounced like y
post #8 of 21
My mom still calls me both of these

Russian:

Solnishko - "little sun"
Lastochka - "bird swallow"

post #9 of 21
French: Mon petit chou: (Mohwn pah-tee shoe) "My little cabbage" (I know it sounds silly, but it's actually a very common one )


I wish I could remember the Spanish word my Mexican friend told me for "little chubby cheeks". I used to call my daughter by that all the time when she was an infant. Maybe someone here knows the word I'm talking about!


And adding to pear-shaped's list, "Bella/bello" - means "beautiful" in Italian. My husband's grandmother called my son "stella de Nonna" (grandma's star) and she calls my daughter "Bella". So we have "stella & bella"
post #10 of 21
In addition to habibi/habibti in Arabic, moms will call their children 'mama' and dads will call their children 'baba' (papa), and it's treated like a term of endearment. So, when my MIL speaks to my husband, she'll address him as 'ya mama'.
post #11 of 21
My Greek in-laws use "kukla" (doll) and "chuppee" (not sure what this one means, but it's definitely an endearment!) for my daughter.
post #12 of 21
In French there's also:

Ma biche (deer)
Mon petit loulou (loulou is sort of like kid, I guess)
Ma puce (puce is a louse, as in singular of lice. Don't ask me!)
Mon petit bonhomme (little guy)

Mon chou/ le bout de chou is the most common though.

In Arabic, as others have said, habibi/habibti.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen'nZoe View Post
In addition to habibi/habibti in Arabic, moms will call their children 'mama' and dads will call their children 'baba' (papa), and it's treated like a term of endearment. So, when my MIL speaks to my husband, she'll address him as 'ya mama'.
When I was living in Egypt everyone was calling young men "son" (yabny) as a term of familiarity. All day long between friends and family just yabny, yabny, yabny. So sort of similar. This last time I went there was nary a "yabny" to be heard, and instead everyone is calling each other "sesame" (simsim). I'm sure there's a slang backstory on that somewhere, but I never caught it.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post
When I was living in Egypt everyone was calling young men "son" (yabny) as a term of familiarity. All day long between friends and family just yabny, yabny, yabny. So sort of similar. This last time I went there was nary a "yabny" to be heard, and instead everyone is calling each other "sesame" (simsim). I'm sure there's a slang backstory on that somewhere, but I never caught it.
Yeah, I should have mentioned that I'm not sure whether the 'mama' 'baba' thing is universally Arab or regional. My MIL is Palestinian, living in Jordan, and this is definitely something common to the Palestinian-Jordanians we know. Oh - and she calls my kids 'taytah' (grandma). I assume that if my FIL were still alive, he'd call them 'zhido' (grandpa).
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen'nZoe View Post
In addition to habibi/habibti in Arabic, moms will call their children 'mama' and dads will call their children 'baba' (papa), and it's treated like a term of endearment. So, when my MIL speaks to my husband, she'll address him as 'ya mama'.
Some Italians do something similar when speaking to children. I'm pretty sure it's a regional thing. When my husband speaks to dd he often adds "a papà" to the end of whatever he says. When he speaks to his nephews he adds "al zio."
post #16 of 21
My Lebanese ILs do this. The boys are "teta" and "jiddo", and my MIL calls DH "mama".

Another term to address people is y'ammi (ammo = uncle)-- DH calls our sons this, jokingly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen'nZoe View Post
Yeah, I should have mentioned that I'm not sure whether the 'mama' 'baba' thing is universally Arab or regional. My MIL is Palestinian, living in Jordan, and this is definitely something common to the Palestinian-Jordanians we know. Oh - and she calls my kids 'taytah' (grandma). I assume that if my FIL were still alive, he'd call them 'zhido' (grandpa).
post #17 of 21
some from peru:
mi calato: my naked one- usually used for newborns or young babies

mamita/papito or mami/papi: little mama, little papa -used for little kids

china- means 'chinese' but its a term of endearment for a little girl

chibolo- slang for little kids

Quote:
I wish I could remember the Spanish word my Mexican friend told me for "little chubby cheeks". I used to call my daughter by that all the time when she was an infant. Maybe someone here knows the word I'm talking about!
was it cacheton? that means chubby cheeks and we called our son that this very morning!
post #18 of 21
Don't know if you're still collecting, but we're in Germany, and my husband calls our DS "Mops", which means pug (like the dogs whose faces look like they've just slammed into a wall). He says it's a really common term of endearment. He also uses it in the diminuitive "Möpschen", pronounced kind of like MUPPS-shin. The cutest is when he says "kleine Mops-Maus-Mann" ="little pug-mouse-man"
post #19 of 21
My ILs used to call DH "DiDi," which I believe is "little emperor" in Mandarin or Taiwanese. Very common for an only son, and believe me, they defer to him like he's an emperor.
post #20 of 21
My DH is from Puerto Rico and he calls our older son papito (pahPEEtoh), which means little papi or father. I think it's odd, but I know it's very common!

We call our younger son chiquitin (cheeky-TEEN). It means little one. DS1 hears it as "Chickyding", so we also call the baby that a lot.
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