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If your dog bit your child... - Page 2

post #21 of 120
This happened to my DD. Our dog is gentle and sweet-tempered. When DD was a toddler, she was poking him and twisting his ears. I did my best to keep them apart and keep an eye on them. One time she got him before I could stop her and he snapped at her. She was shocked and she cried. DH and I reinforced to her that when she hurts the dog, he gets upset and bites back. She learned her lesson and has never done it again. It was a teachable moment and it worked.
post #22 of 120
In a situation like that, when you have worked with him, know he's got some serious temperament issues, and he bit because of food possessiveness/dominance aggression, I'd do the hard thing and have him put down. You all can't trust him, and I wouldn't pass him on to somebody else given what you said about his instability. Would your husband be able to forgive himself if you didn't euthanize the dog and he bit somebody else or bit your DD again? It is totally sucky, but not worth continuing to risk everybody's safety to keep him around. It sounds like you have given the dog a good life.
post #23 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcparker View Post
In a situation like that, when you have worked with him, know he's got some serious temperament issues, and he bit because of food possessiveness/dominance aggression, I'd do the hard thing and have him put down. You all can't trust him, and I wouldn't pass him on to somebody else given what you said about his instability. Would your husband be able to forgive himself if you didn't euthanize the dog and he bit somebody else or bit your DD again? It is totally sucky, but not worth continuing to risk everybody's safety to keep him around. It sounds like you have given the dog a good life.
This.
post #24 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcparker View Post
In a situation like that, when you have worked with him, know he's got some serious temperament issues, and he bit because of food possessiveness/dominance aggression, I'd do the hard thing and have him put down. You all can't trust him, and I wouldn't pass him on to somebody else given what you said about his instability. Would your husband be able to forgive himself if you didn't euthanize the dog and he bit somebody else or bit your DD again? It is totally sucky, but not worth continuing to risk everybody's safety to keep him around. It sounds like you have given the dog a good life.
I agree. I know how hard it is to make this decision, my DH was very opposed as well. Our dog got DD2 in the hand, we did the whole extensive vet exam, kept them separated unless I could watch every second. He bit again and I was literally within arm's reach, and watching, it happened so fast. I couldn't do anything. He got her face that time, minimal damage, thank goodness but that was it. DD1's classmate has severe facial scarring that will require several surgeries as she gets older from a dog bite. It is a chance you do not want to take, you know you can not trust this dog, and you know what you ahve to do now.
post #25 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Our family dog bit our daughter last night. I didn't know my husband had just fed the dog and my one year old daughter crawled into the dining room where his bowl is located. She wasn't "near" him or pulling on him or harassing him in any form when he turned at bit her in the face... growls, snarls, and everything. I know my dog inside and out and his bite on her was very intentional and he meant to hurt her.

I've done extensive training with this dog already as he is very poorly bred and has a very poor temperament due to that poor breeding. Two seconds of unsupervised time with my daughter landed her in the ER having to have stitches on her nose and lip. Yes, it could have been worse. Yes, it happened because we (as parents) failed to protect our daughter and our dog from this situation.

But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb. Despite the years of training I've put into him he's still an incredibly unstable dog. I've done all the training tricks and what have you with the end results of knowing that my dog has severe limitations that can't be trained out and it's up to me to keep him from the situations that I know are dangerous. I've failed and my daughter paid the price.

I think I need to have the dog put down. My husband is having a hard time coming to terms with this. But he knows as well as I do that this dog is not rehomeable due to all his issues, even without his new bite history.
In this situation, you should rely upon your instincts. I totally agree that you should put him down, and without guilt, as it sounds like you have made every effort towards rehabilitation. So sorry this happened to you.
post #26 of 120
The dog would be gone. Immediately.

This happened to me when I was 3 yo. We had a beloved old family dog. I loved her, she loved me, but I hurt her and she snapped at my nose. As much as my parents loved the dog, they felt that was an indication that we did not need to be in the same house, and they couldn't exactly give me away.

They told me they sent her to a farm where she could run free and not have her whiskers pulled by children. However, she was already very old at the time and I suspect that was the story they made up for me, and she was probably put down.
post #27 of 120
Two years ago, our dog bit my 4 year old son in the face unprovoked. He was standing behind her and she was sitting in a chair and she turned her face and bit him. I was sitting right next to area where they were and saw the whole thing.

We put her down, there was no question for us. But even if she had been provoked we would have made the same decision, we can not have a dog that is capable of biting a child in our home. For us it was a simple choice between our son and our dog and we picked our son.

She had a good life and though I cried when I knew she was getting put down, it was absolutely the right decision and one that I don't question at all.
post #28 of 120
Given your 2nd post, I'd say to put the dog down.
post #29 of 120
I have 117 stitches in my face from a dog bite as a child. I will never have a dog in a home with children and I am not real willing to allow my kids near them much. I know that lots of people are very defensive about their animals but given my personal experience I don't feel that dogs should be trusted around small children. This was an animal that had never been aggressive in the past and I wasn't tormenting the animal. The animal was pissed because I had displaced him from sleeping in the bedroom my sister was in. Animals are unpredictable and the damage potential is too great.
post #30 of 120
It would depend on the situation and in your situation I would have the dog put down.
post #31 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Two seconds of unsupervised time with my daughter landed her in the ER having to have stitches on her nose and lip. Yes, it could have been worse. Yes, it happened because we (as parents) failed to protect our daughter and our dog from this situation.

But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb. Despite the years of training I've put into him he's still an incredibly unstable
I would have an incredibly hard time putting my dog down for any reason. My dog is my child, and I would tend to say "just make sure it doesn't happen again" type of thing.

BUT, since he bit in the face, and it broke the skin, AND you feel like he's unpredictable, I'd first call around and look into a better situation that your husband is comfortable with... then my next step would be to have him put down. It was break my heart, and I'd live with guilt forever for it... but, I would do it.

I have a dog who is very oversensitive, and has waaay too many feelings for a dog. If anything happened that would cause me to have to put her into some kind of kennel situation, (the pound) I would probably have to have her put down, because she would be so tormented in a kennel that it just wouldn't be worth it. Her quality of life is very important to me. But, some other dogs are perfectly happy in a kennel, and it would give them a good chance at a nice home without children.

You'd just need to find the right balance for your dog (and your husband).
post #32 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Our family dog bit our daughter last night. I didn't know my husband had just fed the dog and my one year old daughter crawled into the dining room where his bowl is located. She wasn't "near" him or pulling on him or harassing him in any form when he turned at bit her in the face... growls, snarls, and everything. I know my dog inside and out and his bite on her was very intentional and he meant to hurt her.

I've done extensive training with this dog already as he is very poorly bred and has a very poor temperament due to that poor breeding. Two seconds of unsupervised time with my daughter landed her in the ER having to have stitches on her nose and lip. Yes, it could have been worse. Yes, it happened because we (as parents) failed to protect our daughter and our dog from this situation.

But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb. Despite the years of training I've put into him he's still an incredibly unstable dog. I've done all the training tricks and what have you with the end results of knowing that my dog has severe limitations that can't be trained out and it's up to me to keep him from the situations that I know are dangerous. I've failed and my daughter paid the price.

I think I need to have the dog put down. My husband is having a hard time coming to terms with this. But he knows as well as I do that this dog is not rehomeable due to all his issues, even without his new bite history.
Given this update, I would put the dog down (and I don't say that lightly). How heartbreaking -- I'm so sorry.
post #33 of 120
That dog would be gone faster than lightning.
post #34 of 120
Quote:
But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb.
Your answer is right there.

I'm so sorry for your daughter.
post #35 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
I know my dog inside and out and his bite on her was very intentional and he meant to hurt her. <snip>

Two seconds of unsupervised time with my daughter landed her in the ER having to have stitches on her nose and lip. <snip>

But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb. Despite the years of training I've put into him he's still an incredibly unstable dog.
I agree. It's a hard thing to do, but if he's unstable and unresponsive to training, he needs to go.
post #36 of 120
I may have the most unpopular answer of all. Please read Cesar Millan's books (Cesar's Way and Be the Pack Leader). Often times dogs show aggressive behavior because we as humans have been babying them and treating them as dolls and not animals or not giving them the exercise and discipline they need. The domesticated dog (even a chihuahua, shih-tzu or poodle) is so closely related to wolves that the two can interbreed and produce fertile offspring. In our society we tend to humanize dogs and see them as "kids with fur". They have entirely different needs than a human. They are pack animals. When we baby a dog, we feed needy, insecure energy and the dog then feels needy and insecure and reacts aggressively. Dogs also become aggressive if they are cooped up all day and not allowed to walk and exercise. Wolves will migrate several miles a day. All dogs need at least a 1 hour walk a day. Most importantly, YOU MUST BE YOUR DOG'S PACK LEADER. Your dog wants to have a strong stable pack leader and if s/he feels s/he's not getting it, the dog will become insecure and aggressive If your dog is out of control and you can not discipline him/her, you may have to give it away to someone else. The child's safety comes first. You really should seek professional help. Most of the time dogs can be rehabilitated with the right help.

My husband was raised to baby animals. He had dogs growing up and they were cooed over and rarely disciplined. My mother-in-law still calls her cat and dog "angel" and tries to reason with her dog as if she were talking to a human child by saying things like "You know better than that!" The problem is that the dog doesn't know better than that. She doesn't understand human talk and the energy she gets from my MIL is "I'm weak and insecure and I need you to make me feel better." When my husband stopped being our dog's "mommy" and started being her pack leader we saw huge improvements.

We now have two dogs- an American Eskimo and American Eskimo-Pomeranian mix (breeds with reputations for being biters). We have had zero aggression problems with our dogs and baby. In fact, the eski-pom thinks she is our son's "nanny" (a role that single female wolves often take on in a wolf pack) and will cuddle up next to me when I am feeding him and follows me around when I have him. She tries to lick him when he's fussy (that's what dogs do with puppies) but we don't allow it. We never leave children and dogs unattended. We have had our dogs around several other children with no aggression problems. We have a lot to work on with being pack leaders, but our dogs understand that aggressive behavior with kids, especially our son is not tolerated.
post #37 of 120
A minor bite that didn't break skin, and wasn't on the face, I'd consider the circumstances (was she provoked, hurt, etc). I may decide to keep them separated, do training, whatever. I'd assume she was "disciplining" ds, and not being aggressive or fear biting.
But a bite that broke skin, or was in the face? Yeah, I'd put her to sleep. Not worth the chance to me.

I'm not entirely sure I'd keep a dog that growled at kids when they get close to her food. In that case, though, I'd be comfortable rehoming to a child free home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Our family dog bit our daughter last night. I didn't know my husband had just fed the dog and my one year old daughter crawled into the dining room where his bowl is located. She wasn't "near" him or pulling on him or harassing him in any form when he turned at bit her in the face... growls, snarls, and everything. I know my dog inside and out and his bite on her was very intentional and he meant to hurt her.
I think you know what you need to do
post #38 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Our family dog bit our daughter last night. I didn't know my husband had just fed the dog and my one year old daughter crawled into the dining room where his bowl is located. She wasn't "near" him or pulling on him or harassing him in any form when he turned at bit her in the face... growls, snarls, and everything. I know my dog inside and out and his bite on her was very intentional and he meant to hurt her.

I've done extensive training with this dog already as he is very poorly bred and has a very poor temperament due to that poor breeding. Two seconds of unsupervised time with my daughter landed her in the ER having to have stitches on her nose and lip. Yes, it could have been worse. Yes, it happened because we (as parents) failed to protect our daughter and our dog from this situation.

But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb. Despite the years of training I've put into him he's still an incredibly unstable dog. I've done all the training tricks and what have you with the end results of knowing that my dog has severe limitations that can't be trained out and it's up to me to keep him from the situations that I know are dangerous. I've failed and my daughter paid the price.

I think I need to have the dog put down. My husband is having a hard time coming to terms with this. But he knows as well as I do that this dog is not rehomeable due to all his issues, even without his new bite history.
personally i would try to rehome first. i'd just be straight forward and honest with who would adopt and tell them the issues and insist on somebody with plenty of experience with dogs and no children. if this didn't work than you'd have no other choice but to put the dog down. my sister had a poodle that was friendly (had her since she was a puppy) but as the dog got older (age 5/6) it went psycho. went from just snapping at strangers to snapping at my sister and she put the dog to sleep. sad but was necessary. really only you and your dh can make this decision based on what you know about your dog.
post #39 of 120
We had a dog for 10 years that we loved. He was a rescue dog, a Shepherd/Rotweiller cross, who was fear-aggressive. We spent a lot of time working with him (including working with a trainer for over a year) and also keeping him apart from visiting children, and some visitors (he had been burned by cigarettes and some of our friends who smoked would trigger a response in him).

For us he was the most marvellous dog, when we didn't have kids. And under most circumstances he would obey our commands. However, there were some in which he would not. He also killed two raccoons, one without any warning whatsoever.

When I got pregnant with my daughter I cried because I knew he was not able to be trusted, and I didn't believe it was going to be possible for us to be vigilant every. single. minute. in our own home. We worked on rehoming him, but found out he had a bad heart condition and we finally decided to just put him down and be glad about the life we had given him.

It was horrible and I still feel bad about it (especially since my daughter died, so it seemed unnecessary) but I would decide the same again in the same situation. Sometimes your life situation just doesn't make for success with a dog, and if you've been working with a troubled dog for a long time, you just know when you're over your head.

Peace to you.
post #40 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Our family dog bit our daughter last night. I didn't know my husband had just fed the dog and my one year old daughter crawled into the dining room where his bowl is located. She wasn't "near" him or pulling on him or harassing him in any form when he turned at bit her in the face... growls, snarls, and everything. I know my dog inside and out and his bite on her was very intentional and he meant to hurt her.

I've done extensive training with this dog already as he is very poorly bred and has a very poor temperament due to that poor breeding. Two seconds of unsupervised time with my daughter landed her in the ER having to have stitches on her nose and lip. Yes, it could have been worse. Yes, it happened because we (as parents) failed to protect our daughter and our dog from this situation.

But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb. Despite the years of training I've put into him he's still an incredibly unstable dog. I've done all the training tricks and what have you with the end results of knowing that my dog has severe limitations that can't be trained out and it's up to me to keep him from the situations that I know are dangerous. I've failed and my daughter paid the price.

I think I need to have the dog put down. My husband is having a hard time coming to terms with this. But he knows as well as I do that this dog is not rehomeable due to all his issues, even without his new bite history.
Is there any kind of rescue organization that would take him, and perhaps find him a child-free family?

I totally feel for you--pretty much ONLY in your situation would I recommend putting him to sleep. We too, had a ticking time bomb dog. It's very difficult to live like that, especially as your child gets more mobile. We really loved our bad dog very much, and he ended being "ok" with our daughter, but I kept them very separate 95% of the time and she was too little to seek him out. He ended up dying of cancer when she was 3. It was sad, but a relief in many ways.

Now we have a lab who has the temperament of SAINT. She is the sweetest, most patient, happy dog...

I am really, really sorry you are going through this. I can hear you blaming yourself but you cannot be everywhere at once and if you feel in your gut that the dog is not helpable, I actually do think it's more humane to put the dog down.
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