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If your dog bit your child... - Page 4

post #61 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Highly intelligent (border collie), very high drive and very needy.

.
I mentioned earlier in this thread that my dog has too many feelings for a dog. She's a border collie/blue heeler mix. She's ALWAYS on hyper-alert. We can be hiking one mountain, and she's concerned about animals she hears or sees on the next mountain. She never relaxes because she's always looking or listening for something out of the ordinary.

I think these dogs are just too oversensitive for their own good. I bet you can find a great home for your dog. Perhaps he just needs one of those jobs performing, or being in an agility class. Can you call around and see if anybody would love to have him?
post #62 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
He's not a dog that would ever be safe around small children, even at his best training moments. He's not good with strangers in any shape or form, ever. Desensitization with him regarding strangers works on an individual level. I have desensitize him with one stranger and be completely back at square one with the next 100 strangers. There is no generalization with him.

He doesn't step a toe out of line with me... ever. But my husband is a different matter.
I think you say it well here. This is not something you could have changed. Certain breeds and certain dogs can't live in a pack with young. Border Collies, although smart are also known for becoming neurotic when instinct needs aren't always met and have a HIGH herding instinct. It is not something you can train out of an animal. Some within a breed are just more manageable than others. Cesar Has dogs at his home that cannot be placed back in home situations, even with his amazing ability.

If your Dh isn't good with the dominance part then if and when you get another dog I would be careful to pick a submissive personality. My Dh isn't great with this either, but both my dogs are submissive naturally and when he steps up they back down...Except in 'play' situations like seeing birds. They would never do this with me.

Perhaps because he is a purebred you can get in touch with the rescue in your area. That would have a much higher chance of appropriate placement. But I will say, I don't think you should put the animal down. There may very well be a better place for him/her to live more animalistic.
post #63 of 120
Thread Starter 
We (the dog and I) used to do agility before the baby. Of course, we had the time and money to do so. I'm a stay at home mom now with my husband traveling M-F for work. Funds for more agility training is just not possible right now. He totally thrives off the work though. It was great mental and physical stimulation for him. But like I said earlier, even at his best, I could never trust him.

And because of that... I can't see him successfully rehomed. I can't see how that would be fair to him. He would need the perfect home that completely understands his problems and that would be highly unlikely to find.
post #64 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
Our family dog bit our daughter last night. I didn't know my husband had just fed the dog and my one year old daughter crawled into the dining room where his bowl is located. She wasn't "near" him or pulling on him or harassing him in any form when he turned at bit her in the face... growls, snarls, and everything. I know my dog inside and out and his bite on her was very intentional and he meant to hurt her.

I've done extensive training with this dog already as he is very poorly bred and has a very poor temperament due to that poor breeding. Two seconds of unsupervised time with my daughter landed her in the ER having to have stitches on her nose and lip. Yes, it could have been worse. Yes, it happened because we (as parents) failed to protect our daughter and our dog from this situation.

But I've always felt in my heart that my dog is a ticking time bomb. Despite the years of training I've put into him he's still an incredibly unstable dog. I've done all the training tricks and what have you with the end results of knowing that my dog has severe limitations that can't be trained out and it's up to me to keep him from the situations that I know are dangerous. I've failed and my daughter paid the price.

I think I need to have the dog put down. My husband is having a hard time coming to terms with this. But he knows as well as I do that this dog is not rehomeable due to all his issues, even without his new bite history.
In your shoes, I'd put him down too. I'm very sorry. Looks like you've done and tried everything for him, that is a lot more than what most people would do.
post #65 of 120
What I would do in this situation is:
Call every rescue in the area and explain the situation. If no other options present themselves very soon, i would put the dog down.

You never know, though. A rescue may know of the perfect child-free environment for the dog, such as a working ranch.

So sorry this happened to you and your dd.
post #66 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by faithsstuff View Post
I don't want to steal the thread but we are looking at a simialar (though much less extreme case). about 3 months ago we rescued a 7 year old dog from animal control. The dog was fear aggressive but with training, turned into a differant dog. He bit my son on the hand about 2 weeks ago. The skin didn't break but there were teeth marks. I was standing about 2 feet away and my son was near the dog but not touching or interacting with him. A few days ago the dog bit me too. He has also started raising his lip and growling. He's had full vetting, so no issues. I feel like we took responsibility for this dog and placed him in a bad situation. I hate this! He has growled at hubby too. The humane society is full and the rescues won't take him due to age or being full. Ideas?


These are the first signs my dog showed (but only ever to my son and my husband) the next step was him full on attacking and lunging after my husband. Outlook is honestly not good. I did everything humanly possible to prevent putting him down, but in the end, that was the most humane thing to do.
post #67 of 120
if shelters and rescues won't take him I would havce him put down. I cannot imagine living with an agressive dog. If my dog so much as growled aggressively at my children for ANYTHING we would be rehoming. I just do not have the time or energy for monitoring that. And I know I got really really lucky with my dog in that she is not at all aggressive. She plays rough but it was years befor she would do that with the kids and still won't with my youngest. We have had a few injuries from hitting her teeth (she is a German Shepherd mix and is all mouth) but she has never ever bitten or shown any sort of real aggression. not even concerning food. she is completely submissive around other dogs as well. (poor dear would not last long in the wild.) This is the only way I would keep a dog around children. If she had shown any aggression towards the kids or me she would have been packed right back up and sent back where she came from.

If it were just the bite I would think yiour dog would have a good chance of being rehomed (I really do not consider one bite out of the blue that big of a deal) but since he has been a aggressive dog since day one and you have tried and tried to rehabilitate him I would start with a shelter and if that did not work (we have a no refusal shelter but honestly, aggressive dogs are put down right away) or have him put down.

I am so sorry
post #68 of 120
I'd put the dog to sleep immediately.
post #69 of 120
I'm not going to give any advice since we are new puppy owners, but I love this site http://leerburg.com/ there is sooooo much information here. I know you have experience in training but I thought it couldn't hurt to give you the link.
post #70 of 120
In general, it depends. My dog bit me once, didn't break skin though. I was lying on the couch, she was lying on the floor asleep. I stood up. On her. She weighs 20lbs, I weigh a bit more. I'd have bitten too in that situation. She didn't mean to hurt, she was really sorry. And no issues since.

But in your case, I would put the dog down.
post #71 of 120
Personally? I would rehome the dog, ASAP.

If the child was bitten in the face by the dog simply turning from a food bowl? The child WAS "near" the dog. TOO near.

And y'all weren't supervising appropriately, especially knowing that the dog had food/other aggression issues.

And... I would not suggest you get another dog until and unless you do not have small children in your home. Any dog. Sorry. Even the best dog needs to be supervised with a crawling child.
post #72 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
In general, it depends. My dog bit me once, didn't break skin though. I was lying on the couch, she was lying on the floor asleep. I stood up. On her. She weighs 20lbs, I weigh a bit more. I'd have bitten too in that situation. She didn't mean to hurt, she was really sorry. And no issues since.

But in your case, I would put the dog down.
EXACTLY! ! ANY DOG can bite! ANY DOG! My mother raises and travels around the country showing her dogs. She also worked for a vet for many years, so dogs and safety have always been a top priority for me growing up. If a child ACCIDENTLY HURT an animal there is a chance the dog WILL bite. It doesn't mean it's an aggressive dog, but dogs bite when they are hurting. It's their instinct, and one that needs to be respected with caution. It scares me when people say their dogs "would never bite", and they "wouldn't have a dog that they need to monitor". Many of the dog bites reported are from "trusted" pets. We all have to remember that dogs are ANIMALS. I love my dogs, and think they are the sweetest dogs in the world, but I sure as heck wouldn't leave my toddlers in a room with them for long periods of time. My husband works at a hospital in town , and there have been infant/toddler deaths attributed to dog attacks. The dogs were usually pets and lived with the family.
post #73 of 120
OP We were in a very similar situation with our chocolate lab a few years ago when one of my daughters was 1 also. She crawled over by the food dish, he wasn't even near it or eating, and he charged her, stood between her and the dish, snarled and lunged, baring his teeth. He was a loyal, sweet, playful dog that we adored but he had EVERY intention of hurting her. That was it. He was gone.

I'm so sorry that happened, it's ok to feel cruddy, but definitely the dog would be gone. ASAP.
post #74 of 120
I'm afraid you know the answer to the question. But I realize you needed others to confirm that you're probably taking the right steps.

Honestly, around here, if a dog bite winds up in the hospital, it's an automatic quarantine on the dog, and if it's the 2nd offense (I believe it's 2nd), the dog is put down. When I was bitten, it was not the first time that dog had bitten, but it was the first bite that needed stitches (over 30 to the face - and I was an adult). The owner (a good friend) had the dog put down the next day. She received a notice from the city a few days later about the dog and quarantine.

Ultimately, you know the dog is unpredictable, and you know he's a time-bomb. It's just a matter of time until he does it again, and how much worse are you going to feel the next time? Even if it's not your baby he does it to.
post #75 of 120
I'm very sorry to hear that your DD was injured, & that you're being faced with this decision about your dog. Yes, if he's not real stable, & requires constant upkeep, I'd put him down. It's extra hard since he's been your working companion, but there are stable dogs out there, & you've done a lot with him, but he can't be trusted around the human "puppy" (I had a dog who wasn't good around pups (& developed jealousy issues around other family members regarding his possessiveness of me), & he ended up neutered despite a Ch., great OFAs, CGC, & TT - fortunately, by the time my DDs came along, he was hitting old age, & he died when my 1st daughter had just started walking). Until recently, we also had a 15 1/2 year old Staffy Bullx, & while we kept an eye on the girls that they didn't pester him, he was fool proof, had no food issues whatsoever, & was the perfect family dog.

This isn't just a glitch in an otherwise stable dog - this is the last straw, & you don't want to pass a problem dog off on someone else. I love my remaining dog dearly, but if he wasn't entirely amiable around my children, he'd be re-homed, pronto.
post #76 of 120
If the kid provoked it maybe try to rehome the dog. If the dog just *did it* I would euthanise it.
post #77 of 120
I don't have pets for this reason. I don't trust animals enough around young kids, and vice-versa. Even the best dogs can turn in a moment and nobody knows why. It would break my heart.

Needless to say I would try to find another home where there were no children, ideally a farm or something (like they don't have enough dogs, I know!). I would then seek out a shelter and if they thought they could not give the dog away, I would consider euthanizing it.

Read the other responses and I see this is common. to all those who have had this experience. I can't imagine.
post #78 of 120
OP, I know this is a really hard situation. And I know you feel terrible about what happened. I'm really glad that your DD is okay. And I just want to give you a pat on the back because honestly, I think you've been the best owner this particular dog could have ever had. It sounds like you have really worked hard to provide this dog what he needed to have the best life he could have. I know that you're kicking yourself for what happened and for not being more aware, but I honestly think you deserve more recognition for the years of hard work you've given your dog rather than guilt for the few moments of miscommunication that led up to the bite. I know you feel awful about what happened, but I also think you should feel good about the life you were able to provide for your pet. It sounds like you really worked hard and gave him a better chance than most people would have.
post #79 of 120
I think you owe it to the dog to at least try to find a new home. It sounds like this dog was the center of attention and getting all it's needs met for a long time and then it all just stopped. I totally understand why but the dog doesn't.

I also want to say something about all the emphasis on face biting. She's crawling towards him on the floor .. and she's a tiny one year old. What part of her is closest to the dog in that situation? It's really not the same situation as a dog attacking an adult, throwing them down and then going for the face .. ykwim?
post #80 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanniesue2 View Post
OP, I know this is a really hard situation. And I know you feel terrible about what happened. I'm really glad that your DD is okay. And I just want to give you a pat on the back because honestly, I think you've been the best owner this particular dog could have ever had. It sounds like you have really worked hard to provide this dog what he needed to have the best life he could have. I know that you're kicking yourself for what happened and for not being more aware, but I honestly think you deserve more recognition for the years of hard work you've given your dog rather than guilt for the few moments of miscommunication that led up to the bite. I know you feel awful about what happened, but I also think you should feel good about the life you were able to provide for your pet. It sounds like you really worked hard and gave him a better chance than most people would have.
Very well said. OP, have you made a decision? (((hugs)))


Quote:
Originally Posted by bebebradford View Post
EXACTLY! ! ANY DOG can bite! ANY DOG! My mother raises and travels around the country showing her dogs. She also worked for a vet for many years, so dogs and safety have always been a top priority for me growing up. If a child ACCIDENTLY HURT an animal there is a chance the dog WILL bite. It doesn't mean it's an aggressive dog, but dogs bite when they are hurting. It's their instinct, and one that needs to be respected with caution. It scares me when people say their dogs "would never bite", and they "wouldn't have a dog that they need to monitor". Many of the dog bites reported are from "trusted" pets. We all have to remember that dogs are ANIMALS. I love my dogs, and think they are the sweetest dogs in the world, but I sure as heck wouldn't leave my toddlers in a room with them for long periods of time. My husband works at a hospital in town , and there have been infant/toddler deaths attributed to dog attacks. The dogs were usually pets and lived with the family.
This is a very good message.

I trust my dog about 99.9% - he has no food issues, DS can feed him, any of us can take food away from him, he's just laid back and doesn't much care. I think it is more laziness than good behavior. BUT he's still a dog. With teeth. Stuff can happen so there's no unsupervised time.

He accidentally nipped DS once - DS had a snack and was waving it, ended up swinging it towards Sam, Sam thought DS was giving it to him and went to take it just as DS moved his hand and Sam ended up getting a finger. Didn't even leave a mark (he released immediately when he didn't touch food) but now we have a "no snacks except at the table" if Sam is out and about.

I still put him away in a room if we have kids over who are not used to dogs. You can't be too careful.
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