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post #41 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamieCole View Post
Asked to leave in the middle of the flight? Like they are going to give us parachutes and open a door?

Or do you mean to imply that a flight will be redirected to make an unscheduled stop just to remove a crying baby? I've never heard of either scenario. But it really doesn't matter.

As I pointed out, my kids travel well. I've flown with my each of my boys from the time DS1 was 8 weeks old until 3 years and lots of stages in-between and I have never ONCE thought, "Hmmmm, maybe I should bring some sedatives so that he sleeps on the flight/doesn't disturb other people on the plane, JUST IN CASE." And none of my kids have even cried inconsolably on a plane. A whimper here or there, then I figure out the problem, parent it and they are happy again. Is it hard work? Yes. Am I super tired by the end of the flight? Yep. But I'm not going to choose to give my child a medication that could potentially kill them.

The whole concept boggles me. It's ok to drug our kids to make things easier for us as parents? Why not just drug the baby to sleep so I can spend more quiet time at the library with the 3 year-old? He didn't take a very long nap today. Maybe I should give him some benedryl so I can get some sleep tonight. We could actually go see a movie if I could be assured the baby would sleep all the way through it. Hey, let's just give him some drugs and go catch the 6 o'clock show. My husband and I would LOVE to go to a fancy restaurant. I bet I could just drug the baby and he'll sleep the whole time. We get to eat a place with real tablecloths again and no one in the restaurant will have to worry about a crying baby.

Where does it stop? So many people seem so casual about this.

I have seen a perfectly healthy little girl turned into a wheelchair-bound, unable to speak, paralyzed little girl who died after a 3 year fight for her life. All because of one dose of Motrin and she had a terrible reaction. I think about that every single time I decide to give my children a medication. Are they in so much pain that the risk is worth it? We act like these medications are just like candy. No harm, no foul. They have risks. And I could NOT live with myself for casually giving my baby a medication he didn't need for the simple reason of convenience to me.
Respectfully, I think you are taking this to an extreme that no one intends. Giving a child a mild sedative to make them more comfortable on a plane is not the same thing as drugging an infant every time you think they should be sleeping. It's just not. Most mothers on this forum are well aware that medications are not candy. It is not "casually giving my baby medication he doesn't need" if the child is inconsolable on a flight.

I do think it is absolutely something to be used judiciously.
post #42 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkinhead View Post
Respectfully, I think you are taking this to an extreme that no one intends. Giving a child a mild sedative to make them more comfortable on a plane is not the same thing as drugging an infant every time you think they should be sleeping. It's just not. Most mothers on this forum are well aware that medications are not candy. It is not "casually giving my baby medication he doesn't need" if the child is inconsolable on a flight.

I do think it is absolutely something to be used judiciously.
The thing is it *isn't* a sedative, as it has been said over and over, it is an antihistamine that in some people has a sedative effect.

And it doesn't always have that effect-- 2 of my children who have taken it for allergies react like it is crack.

I've flown on all different types of flights with 3 of my children in differing stages of infancy. I've never though, "Oh crap I need to drug them to make them more comfortable, just this once."

edit to add: and respectfully, it does make me think of those people who were running the day care and would give the children nyquil to make them sleep. The only difference is the frequency (every day vs. once).
post #43 of 115
When I was a kid, we used to give the dog Benadryl for long trips in the car ...

That said, I remember vividly the first time I flew (around 6 years old) and it was painful, even with all of the gum-chewing and holding-your-nose-and-blowing that my mom had me do. I definitely agree to try nursing to help with the babe's ears.
post #44 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkinhead View Post
If a child is being truly disruptive to a sufficient number of passengers and/or crew members, they can and will make an unscheduled stop or ask you to de-plane at a scheduled one.


It does happen

http://travel.msn.co.nz/destinations...ld-from-flight

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/AmericanFa...2815486&page=1

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Parenting/...5238571&page=1

http://honeymoons.about.com/b/2007/0...from-plane.htm


It's not a matter of making our job easier as parents, it's a matter of considering the other passengers on the plane. Granted, most of the time, children do just fine. IF they are screaming non-stop for whatever reason, I personally think it's pretty cruel to everyone around, including the child, to continue without exhausting every possible avenue to make the child (and again, everyone else around) more comfortable.
These were all toddlers, not babies. The flights were not stopped mid-flight, but just pulled back to the gate. So, this was not an issue of the child is in pain ... just the child is throwing a tantrum.

The strategies that I use to keep my toddler quiet on the flight are not the same as when he was a baby. But I would not use drugs on him, unless he was sick and needed them or if our lives depended on it.
post #45 of 115
When I flew with my DS I nursed him when he cried and he stopped. He dozed off and I placed him in the craddle (In the bulk head seats, GET ONE!).

He woke MUCH more than usual and cried because he was in pain and probably a bit scared. I arrived EXHAUSTED and the passengers were a little annoyed to have to share a cabin space with a periodically crying baby and a VERY frazzled mom.

I never ONCE considered giving him drugs to calm him down...I thought of popping a valium myself at moments (It was a 28 hour flight with the two lay overs included and I was all alone...bad move in retrospect!) but the idea of giving my kid drugs was just not on the radar, and I was pretty mainstream back then.

I have heard people make this suggestion even here but I ALWAYS assumed they were just joking. I am quite surprised to read that people actually have done this.

FWIW, on the flight back he slept on every flight from take off to landing and was full of smiles and coos for everyone so that every single deboarding we got a host of "Oh my god, was there a baby on the plane?!" and "What an angel! He is just so sweet." which I can tell you feels a lot better than the sympathetic looks of passengers and the glares of fight attendants. (IME the passengers were WAY more sympathetic than the stewards who treated my son and I like the spawn of Satan) Now the moment the engine starts to hum he curls up and drifts off and wakes up about ten minutes before landing. Hoping DD is the same when we fly to Colombia next week.

My sister used Rescue Remedy on her little one who was teething a pair of molars when she flew from New York to Argentina for my wedding. She was still not the happiest baby in the world, but it did help HUGELY and got her to sleep for at least two three hour stints over the course of the 11 hours. Stuff to entertain helps too.
post #46 of 115
I am amused... but not surprised... that those who can't imagine giving their child Benadryl, for whom it never occured to them to give their child Benadryl are the same ones whose children have always managed to fly without great difficulty.

I'm not seeing a lot of humility that they were lucky that their child was consolable. I'm not seeing the recognition that you can do all of the right things and still end up with a little one who is totally freaking out non-stop.

It reminds me of the advice I'd hear for those with morning sickness when I was suffering from hyperemesis.

I would think, "Look, lady... if saltines and ginger ale help you feel better, that is wonderful. But if they do, that means that your suffering was in a totally different field than mine."

Don't think that just because saltines work for you, anyone who uses Zofran is a druggie. Count your blessings!
post #47 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by VillageMom6 View Post
I am amused... but not surprised... that those who can't imagine giving their child Benadryl, for whom it never occured to them to give their child Benadryl are the same ones whose children have always managed to fly without great difficulty.

I'm not seeing a lot of humility that they were lucky that their child was consolable. I'm not seeing the recognition that you can do all of the right things and still end up with a little one who is totally freaking out non-stop.

It reminds me of the advice I'd hear for those with morning sickness when I was suffering from hyperemesis.

I would think, "Look, lady... if saltines and ginger ale help you feel better, that is wonderful. But if they do, that means that your suffering was in a totally different field than mine."

Don't think that just because saltines work for you, anyone who uses Zofran is a druggie. Count your blessings!
I think it's hard to communicate all your thoughts in a short forum post, but I definitely consider myself lucky that my son has always been easy to console, with few exceptions. What I think people can't imagine here is giving Benadryl or other drugs without even trying a million other things first. It's like saying to a woman who's not even pregnant, oh just take Zofran when you get pregnant and you'll be fine. Yes, drugs have their place, but it's not FIRST place, it's as a last resort. Do I give my kid Tylenol if they're in pain...yes, I do. But I don't give it on the chance he may be in pain in the future...but when I actually see he needs it.
post #48 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmel23 View Post
The thing is it *isn't* a sedative, as it has been said over and over, it is an antihistamine that in some people has a sedative effect.

And it doesn't always have that effect-- 2 of my children who have taken it for allergies react like it is crack.
And most sedatives are also antihistamines unless they are narcotics. And sometimes drugs affect some people differently, but the majority of those who do take it respond to it in a predictable fashion. I have never given my children benadryl to make them sleep. I'm just not opposed to it like so many of you seem to be.
post #49 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmk1 View Post
These were all toddlers, not babies. The flights were not stopped mid-flight, but just pulled back to the gate. So, this was not an issue of the child is in pain ... just the child is throwing a tantrum.

The strategies that I use to keep my toddler quiet on the flight are not the same as when he was a baby. But I would not use drugs on him, unless he was sick and needed them or if our lives depended on it.
Respectufully, I don't recall saying that a flight would be stopped in mid air. That was an assumption made by two other posters. I said "You could be removed from a flight if XYZ".

The little boy in one of the articles was 11 or 12 months old.
post #50 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmk1 View Post
I think it's hard to communicate all your thoughts in a short forum post, but I definitely consider myself lucky that my son has always been easy to console, with few exceptions. What I think people can't imagine here is giving Benadryl or other drugs without even trying a million other things first. It's like saying to a woman who's not even pregnant, oh just take Zofran when you get pregnant and you'll be fine. Yes, drugs have their place, but it's not FIRST place, it's as a last resort. Do I give my kid Tylenol if they're in pain...yes, I do. But I don't give it on the chance he may be in pain in the future...but when I actually see he needs it.
I disagree. I think it's more like telling a newly pretgnant woman "You might just have morning sickness and if you do you can try XYZ. If it keeps getting worse and nothing is working there are drugs that can help you". That's what I was saying personally. And when I had hyperemesis, I did have "friends" who expressed sheer horror at the mere thought of me putting "toxins" into my body and exposing my child to them. Even after I'd lost 17lbs and was recieving IV nutrition every night for 3 months. So, sometimes as parents we like to hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.
post #51 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmk1 View Post
I think it's hard to communicate all your thoughts in a short forum post, but I definitely consider myself lucky that my son has always been easy to console, with few exceptions. What I think people can't imagine here is giving Benadryl or other drugs without even trying a million other things first. It's like saying to a woman who's not even pregnant, oh just take Zofran when you get pregnant and you'll be fine. Yes, drugs have their place, but it's not FIRST place, it's as a last resort. Do I give my kid Tylenol if they're in pain...yes, I do. But I don't give it on the chance he may be in pain in the future...but when I actually see he needs it.
I KNOW I am lucky that my kid adjusted. I just mean to say, drugs never crossed my mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkinhead View Post
I disagree. I think it's more like telling a newly pretgnant woman "You might just have morning sickness and if you do you can try XYZ. If it keeps getting worse and nothing is working there are drugs that can help you". That's what I was saying personally. And when I had hyperemesis, I did have "friends" who expressed sheer horror at the mere thought of me putting "toxins" into my body and exposing my child to them. Even after I'd lost 17lbs and was recieving IV nutrition every night for 3 months. So, sometimes as parents we like to hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.
But that is NOT what is happening to the OP. People are not telling her to bring Benadryl IN CASE, they are saying be preemptive and give her child benadryl to make them sleep REGARDLESS of the reaction her child may or may not have. At least that is how I (and I assume many others here) read it.

If your child NEEDS a mild sedative to calm his/her nerves because s/he is a afraid, nervous, whatever and they NEED the drugs to calm down and you have consulted a MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL who can give you proper dosing...that's TOTALLY different from just assuming he/she will react badly and preparing by buying a bottle of OTC allergy medicine and dosing as you see fit.
post #52 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by hakeber View Post
I KNOW I am lucky that my kid adjusted. I just mean to say, drugs never crossed my mind.



But that is NOT what is happening to the OP. People are not telling her to bring Benadryl IN CASE, they are saying be preemptive and give her child benadryl to make them sleep REGARDLESS of the reaction her child may or may not have. At least that is how I (and I assume many others here) read it.

If your child NEEDS a mild sedative to calm his/her nerves because s/he is a afraid, nervous, whatever and they NEED the drugs to calm down and you have consulted a MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL who can give you proper dosing...that's TOTALLY different from just assuming he/she will react badly and preparing by buying a bottle of OTC allergy medicine and dosing as you see fit.
Which is exactly why I said that I wouldn't be opposed to using it if needed, hence bringing it along just in case, but I wouldn't give it pre-emptively.
post #53 of 115
My OP on this thread . Bold added by me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkinhead View Post

I agree that using Benadryl because you think your child might be difficult is not best practice. I take no issue with bringing Benadryl "just in case". Trapped in a hollow metal tube at 16000 ft with a miserable child and and a cabin full of resentful passengers isn't a place I want to be without some kind of ammo. Benadryl is commonly recommended as a sedative for wee ones because it's safer and more predictable than other sedatives.

I don't really see it as any different than giving a child "calming herbs" either. A drug is a drug is a drug whether you get it from herbs or elsewhere.

I think it's better to just wait and see how your child does. I've flown with both one at varying ages. I brought the Benadryl, but I didn't need it. They were fine . A box of tissues makes an awesome toy for a baby. It bought me almost 40 minutes of contentedness. First we took them all out, then we put them all back in. Then we took them out again. Then we stuffed them in our sleeves. Post-it notes are a good one too!
post #54 of 115
If I were you (and concerned based on my child's personality) I would bring something just in case, but more likely Hylands "calm" homeopathic things.

Benadryl scares me too! And that was before the huge cautions about giving cold meds to kids under 2. I do always bring tylenol as a "just in case" too ... because my kids can spark a 105-fever in an instant, plus it seems to make them drowsy. So far I have not had to use it!

Also - stock up on non-sugar snacks (if your child eats solids yet) ... puffs or cheerios or whatever. A new sippy cup (if appropriate). Toys & books s/he hasn't seen before. The special lovie or blankie. Perhaps even a boppy.

What does your child love? Bring that. I saw a mom entertain a baby for an hour by letting her rip pages out of a magazine. The baby was laughing hysterically! Whatever works!!
post #55 of 115
The thing is, how do you know how it will affect your child unless you give it to them before getting on the plane as a test?

I find it extremely amusing to imagine myself on a plane with my kids and giving them benadryl for the first time. HA! That would really annoy the passengers. Fussy baby on crack.

"Diphenhydramine should not be used to cause sleepiness in children."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0000704
post #56 of 115
I think this is one of those issues that there is one common thought towards something and when that doesn't turn out to be the case there is a lot of resistance.

Quote:
Nonprescription cough and cold combination products, including products that contain diphenhydramine, can cause serious side effects or death in young children. Do not give these products to children younger than 4 years of age. If you give these products to children 4-11 years of age, use caution and follow the package directions carefully
I would think such side effects are very rare, I have always had bad allergies, even at the ages where benadryl isn't recommended. When I was little though one just took it, I have no idea how much my mom gave me over the years.

I wouldn't give benadryl to kids, there are safer antihistimines now than when I was little. I have never seen a meltdown to the extent where I medicated my children. I cannot imagine what that would look like. I would feel bad for anyone who was having that rough of a time
post #57 of 115
When we used to take transatlantic flights, I never give benadryl to DS who ranged in age between 6-18 months on these flights. He would nurse, do some sleeping, play with me/us. On one flight the captain/co-pilot came out and asked if he could hold him stating it was a shame they couldn't take show them the cockpit anymore. On that same flight another couple were seated in front of us with their son who a little older. They dosed their child with a prescription antihistamine and he did fall asleep. They told us that they did this everytime they flew. However, their son woke up, became extremely upset and screamed continually for the last 30 minutes of the flight, all the way through customs and immigration and in the baggage hall. We could still hear him as we left the airport.
post #58 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrskingred View Post
When we used to take transatlantic flights, I never give benadryl to DS who ranged in age between 6-18 months on these flights. He would nurse, do some sleeping, play with me/us. On one flight the captain/co-pilot came out and asked if he could hold him stating it was a shame they couldn't take show them the cockpit anymore. On that same flight another couple were seated in front of us with their son who a little older. They dosed their child with a prescription antihistamine and he did fall asleep. They told us that they did this everytime they flew. However, their son woke up, became extremely upset and screamed continually for the last 30 minutes of the flight, all the way through customs and immigration and in the baggage hall. We could still hear him as we left the airport.
I wouldn't think the benedryl did that. Chances are they give him benedryl when they travel because of how poorly he handles traveling. My older dd was awful traveling at that age. We never gave her anything, but it was really awful and we had to just not go some places we might have liked to go.
post #59 of 115
Can I take the Benadryl for myself? I do always have it on hand on trips because DS2 has insanely sensitive skin and is just a touch away from hives, but it's packed. I do bring Tylenol for kids and hubby in case of ear pain, which has been described by hubby as excruciating.

Thankfully *touch wood* my guys do well on flights. I do bring a portable DVD player for them and will drug them with non-stop dinosaur and shark movies if I have to. I can do all the colouring and activities with them, but I'm beat by the time I get everyone and everything loaded on the plane and I still have to gather everything once we get off, so I try to use the opportunity to relax.
post #60 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmel23 View Post
The thing is, how do you know how it will affect your child unless you give it to them before getting on the plane as a test?

I find it extremely amusing to imagine myself on a plane with my kids and giving them benadryl for the first time. HA! That would really annoy the passengers. Fussy baby on crack.

"Diphenhydramine should not be used to cause sleepiness in children."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0000704
To be fair, pretty much every drug known to man is contraindicated by those that manufacture it for nursing mothers as well. Sometimes, we have to use our own discernement and the advice of those with extensive experience.
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