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Calling all old school sci fan/fantasy readers! - Page 4

post #61 of 111
Thread Starter 
Hmmm...I might take 'old school' out of the title. I personally meant 'all the books I never got to read in my late teens/20s because I was busy reading other stuff'

Is there a general difference, ya think, between current spec fic and the older (10, 20 yrs ago) works? I see more female authors (and more vampire books)...
post #62 of 111
I started reading spec fic in the late 70s/early 80s, but most of what I was reading was a lot older. The biggest trends I've noticed were/are the upsurge of cyberpunk style books in the late 80s/early 90s, and the massive resurgence of fantasy, especially urban fantasy, which seems to have happened sometime in the last 10-15 years or so...but it might be longer than that, as my time sense has become really unreliable over the last couple decades. I do agree that there seem to be a lot more female authors now, as well.

Urban fantasy, especially the vampire-focused stuff, seems to have really taken off. I'm not sure if Buffy was a cause or an effect, but I always think of her as being in at the beginning, yk? (And, I never dreamed that the incredibly bizarre original movie was going to spin off into something so...widespread.)
post #63 of 111
We nearly named my son after a character in one of Roger Zelazny's books.


He came out with curly dark hair so it didn't seem to suit him as well.
post #64 of 111
I have been hopelessly addicted for over a year now to different kinds of fantasy fiction. It all started with Twilight Saga. I'd never read a vampire book until then and was never even interested!

Some of you already know this as I started a similar thread a while back, but as a teenager I had to force myself to get through the Lord of the Rings and had written off Fantasy Fiction ever since. Now I am open to all kinds of things....
I am currently reading Hunting Ground, the second book of the Alpha and Omega series by Patricia Briggs (the author of the Mercedes Thompson series) and really enjoying them. The covers make them look like tacky romances but I find them to be very well written. The Sex and violence are not overly graphic, more than Twilight obviously, but less than the Sookie Stackhouse books.
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/b/...s/cry-wolf.htm
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/b/...ing-ground.htm

The stories revolve mostly about a pack of werewolves but as it takes place in the same universe as the Mercedes Thompson series, so there are also witches, vampires and fairies.
I have ordered the Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson from the library.
I tried The Serpent’s Shadow by Mercedes Lackey but did not like it enough to continue her other books. All the details of the magic bored me and did not seem believable.

Sorry! I just realised that none of the novels I am talking about would be considered Old School!
post #65 of 111
I seriously LOVE, LOVE LOVE Terry Pratchett, and am so very sad that he has the early stages of Alzheimer's. His YA books are as enjoyable for me as his adult books.

I think Neil Gaiman would count in this catagory too. I particularly enjoyed "American Gods", "Anansi Boys" and of course, "Good Omens".

The Stephen R. Donaldson series that begins with "The Mirror of Her Dreams" is one of my favorites as well.
post #66 of 111
OP: I was thinking about this thread yesterday, and realized that nobody has actually mentioned (unless I missed it, but I don't want to re-read the thread to check) that Terry Pratchett isn't exactly a fantasy author. He's a satirist. In tretrospect, I realize that one of the reasons I didn't like Pyramids the first time I read it is because I was expecting a fantasy story, and that's not exactly what I got. (It is what I got...walking, talking mummies, grass sprouting from people's feet, magical pyramids, etc...but that's not really how it felt.)
post #67 of 111
I was thinking about the themes of marriage and parenting in Heinlein and remembered how To Sail Beyond the Sunset handled the middle-aged husband dumping his wife for a younger woman and also the teenaged children who haven't been raised right...and even the black domestic servants....different from Farnham's Freehold and yet also not that different....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I started reading spec fic in the late 70s/early 80s, but most of what I was reading was a lot older. The biggest trends I've noticed were/are the upsurge of cyberpunk style books in the late 80s/early 90s, and the massive resurgence of fantasy, especially urban fantasy, which seems to have happened sometime in the last 10-15 years or so...but it might be longer than that, as my time sense has become really unreliable over the last couple decades. I do agree that there seem to be a lot more female authors now, as well.

Urban fantasy, especially the vampire-focused stuff, seems to have really taken off. I'm not sure if Buffy was a cause or an effect, but I always think of her as being in at the beginning, yk? (And, I never dreamed that the incredibly bizarre original movie was going to spin off into something so...widespread.)
I started in the early 80s, and yes, read a lot of older SF. I mostly bought paperbacks, comics, and magazines at my local newsstand -- tended to buy short story anthologies, because I had a better chance of finding at least one story I liked. More than once I bought a novel and then couldn't read it - waste of my allowance. Then I'd follow up on authors I liked in my library's limited collection or through bookstores in the city. I walked into a bookstore downtown in about 1989 and asked for "Science Fiction by women authors that isn't about dragons." and got some great recommendations that set me up for the 90s in many ways.

Cyberpunk really left me cold, didn't read much of it. CJ Cherryh was my fave for harder SF.

I saw the Buffy movie in theaters too, and agree that it was crazy that a series and a big Vampire Novel Trend would emerge from that wierd, not-very-popular film...

I really enjoyed S. M. Stirling's Island in the Sea of Time series and am waiting anxiously for the next novel in his Dies the Fire series. I could do without the S&M and torture scenes he writes in some of his other books, though.

I love some of Guy Gavriel Kay's fantasy novels, too. And Dave Duncan has a neat take on Sword and Sorcery, when I'm looking for guys in chainmail, not just chicks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breathless Wonder View Post
I seriously LOVE, LOVE LOVE Terry Pratchett, and am so very sad that he has the early stages of Alzheimer's. His YA books are as enjoyable for me as his adult books.

I think Neil Gaiman would count in this catagory too. I particularly enjoyed "American Gods", "Anansi Boys" and of course, "Good Omens".

The Stephen R. Donaldson series that begins with "The Mirror of Her Dreams" is one of my favorites as well.
Breathless Wonder, I have to say that Prachett can be funny but I've never been a big fan of his -- so many people I know just love his books, though.

Ditto Neil Gaiman. I've always meant to read Donaldson.

[QUOTE=jalilah;15678347]I have been hopelessly addicted for over a year now to different kinds of fantasy fiction. It all started with Twilight Saga. I'd never read a vampire book until then and was never even interested! /QUOTE]

There are a *lot* of paperback series of young-woman-dealing-with-vamps/weres/fairies/demons out there right now, aren't there? They are all starting to blur together....Besides the authors you mentioned, I like Melanie Rawn's Spellbinder and sequels about Holly McLure best.

I've picked up a few of the Rogue Angel series -- didn't realize it was a franchise with different Harlequin authors doing different books. That explains why a couple have been pretty good and one was so awful I'll never read another.

Stayed up late last night finishing a book in this genre, M.L.N. Hanover's Unclean Spirits, and I liked that well enough that I'll look for the sequel.
post #68 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aubergine68 View Post
I was thinking about the themes of marriage and parenting in Heinlein and remembered how To Sail Beyond the Sunset handled the middle-aged husband dumping his wife for a younger woman and also the teenaged children who haven't been raised right...and even the black domestic servants....different from Farnham's Freehold and yet also not that different....
I don't mind Heinlein's take on marriage, and I think the issues of race were meant to reflect the times. His take on parenting sometimes gets on my nerves, but I just see him as a typical person with no kids who thought he had all the answers, yk? Lots of people without children are parenting "experts". Heinlein just never got humbled by sleep deprivation, button pushing, etc., like the rest of us.

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I started in the early 80s, and yes, read a lot of older SF. I mostly bought paperbacks, comics, and magazines at my local newsstand -- tended to buy short story anthologies, because I had a better chance of finding at least one story I liked. More than once I bought a novel and then couldn't read it - waste of my allowance. Then I'd follow up on authors I liked in my library's limited collection or through bookstores in the city. I walked into a bookstore downtown in about 1989 and asked for "Science Fiction by women authors that isn't about dragons." and got some great recommendations that set me up for the 90s in many ways.
I mostly just went to the school library, then when I got a job, there was a secondhand bookstore down the street, so I picked 5 SF novels every Monday on my lunch break...

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Cyberpunk really left me cold, didn't read much of it.
I read a bit of it, but it definitely isn't my preferred subgenre.

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Ditto Neil Gaiman. I've always meant to read Donaldson.
I haven't read Gaiman yet. I enjoyed "Good Omens", but I have a pretty good idea which aspects were Gaiman, as opposed to Pratchett, and I have a feeling I wouldn't like his solo stuff. I really should at least try one, though. Donaldson...he did Thomas Covenant, right? I didn't like them at all.

Quote:
There are a *lot* of paperback series of young-woman-dealing-with-vamps/weres/fairies/demons out there right now, aren't there? They are all starting to blur together....Besides the authors you mentioned, I like Melanie Rawn's Spellbinder and sequels about Holly McLure best.
Hey - Nora Roberts has books about vampires! The world is weird. (My mom loaned the "Circle" trilogy to tme, and I kind of liked them. *sigh*) I read one series on this theme that I liked - first two books - but I can't remember what they were called now. I'll have to find them.
post #69 of 111
I've also been reading patricia briggs, jalilah, and enjoying them. I'm a fan of I think I heard it called "paranormal romance" books? lol (though the sookie stackhouse ones, I got the first from the library and put it down after 10 pages. no clue why, I just was not into it.) I'm also liking kelley armstrong's otherworld series. they both feel like... I don't know, "disreputable" reading as compared to say asimov or terrorists of irustan though lol. that might be the covers on the patricia briggs ones though. uggg.


I loved terrorists of irustan, I finished it last night. no wait, I finished dragonflight last night (which I also loved), terrorists of irustan was two nights ago. lol.
post #70 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

I haven't read Gaiman yet. I enjoyed "Good Omens", but I have a pretty good idea which aspects were Gaiman, as opposed to Pratchett, and I have a feeling I wouldn't like his solo stuff. I really should at least try one, though. Donaldson...he did Thomas Covenant, right? I didn't like them at all.
Neil Gaiman's Sandman series is truly amazing, it is in graphic novel form but your library should have them.

I like Donaldson ok but the Thomas Covenant stuff is a bit *too* depressing for me.

Stranger in a Strange Land isn't my favorite book.

I do like Steven Brust and his Phoenix Guards books.

I like Cyberpunk ok, it isn't my favorite. I am really not fond of vampire books. I got tired of vampire stuff already. '

I like Tad Williams' Memory, Sorrow and Thorn and some of his other stuff. I love Raymond Feist, Frank Herbert and Douglas Adams.

I have read LotR at least once every year since I was about eight. I have a Tolkien Calendar with my baby milestones on it.

My parents enjoyed sci fi/fantasy and I cut my teeth on CJ Cherryh, Marion Zimmer Bradley and Anne Mccaffrey
post #71 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chamomile Girl View Post
Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series has great characters, and its worth a read, but it just keeps going and going and going. In fact its still not finished and Robert Jordan is freaking dead Plus by the end you wish the main character would just get therapy or something.
Jordan's wife picked Brandon Sanderson to finish the series for him and one of the books he wrote is out. I thought it was pretty good, he seems to be tying up loose ends rather quickly and there were LOTS of loose ends laying around.
post #72 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy View Post
I like Donaldson ok but the Thomas Covenant stuff is a bit *too* depressing for me.
That's all I've read. Maybe I'll try something else. As I recall (read those a long time ago), I liked his writing well enough, but didn't enjoy the story or the protagonist.

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I have read Wheel of Time. There are only two books left.
I don't believe I'm ever going to understand the appeal of these ones.

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I do like Steven Brust and his Phoenix Guards books.
Yes, yes, yes. I forgot these. I've only read two, but plan to read more. I love his style. (He actually reminds me a little of Lois McMaster-Bujold.)

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I like Cyberpunk ok, it isn't my favorite. I am really not fond of vampire books. I got tired of vampire stuff already. '
I think vampire books can be good, but I'm not a big fan of the whole "oh - the undead are so uber sexy and irresitible" thing. Blech.

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I like Tad Williams' Memory, Sorrow and Thorn and some of his other stuff.
hmm...I know I've read something of his, but I don't know what...
post #73 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

I don't believe I'm ever going to understand the appeal of these ones.
My gamer friends read them so I did. I like big huge books. I worked in a game/comic book store.

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hmm...I know I've read something of his, but I don't know what...
Tad Williams is all over the map. He's written some of everything. He even wrote a book about cats. (the cat book is pretty good) I haven't been able to get into Otherland so much but dh loves it. I like the Shawdowmarch books and the War of the Flowers is good. He drives me a bit crazy cause he has multiple series going at once.
post #74 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy View Post
My gamer friends read them so I did. I like big huge books. I worked in a game/comic book store.
I like big huge books, too. I just found the Wheel of Time soooo boring. It's too slow, too repetitive, and just too cliched. I don't know why I kept with it as long as I did (probably because so many people recommended it to me that I thought it must get better), but by about book 4, I was hoping the Dark One (that's what he was called, right?) would break out and kill all the main characters, just to end it. And, I swear if I'd seen a description of one more skirt smoothing or braid tug, my head would have exploded!

Quote:
Tad Williams is all over the map. He's written some of everything. He even wrote a book about cats. (the cat book is pretty good) I haven't been able to get into Otherland so much but dh loves it. I like the Shawdowmarch books and the War of the Flowers is good. He drives me a bit crazy cause he has multiple series going at once.
hmm....none of that rings a bell. I think I'll go find his list of works, and see if I can recognize anything.
post #75 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I like big huge books, too. I just found the Wheel of Time soooo boring. It's too slow, too repetitive, and just too cliched. I don't know why I kept with it as long as I did (probably because so many people recommended it to me that I thought it must get better), but by about book 4, I was hoping the Dark One (that's what he was called, right?) would break out and kill all the main characters, just to end it. And, I swear if I'd seen a description of one more skirt smoothing or braid tug, my head would have exploded!
I think Brian Sandersen reduced the braid tugging and hair pulling quite a lot.

It did get boring for a bit and then picked back up. I have enjoyed the last few books.

He writes strong female characters but his female characters can be a bit annoying sometimes.

WoT spoiler look out!

Warning :: Spoiler Ahead! Highlight to read message!
Rand did decide to start using balefire again, which isn't supposed to be good but I was a bit relieved. "Oh good! He balefired that Forsaken person! Won't have to worry about them again!" It certainly ties up a lot of things rather effeciently
post #76 of 111
Well how interesting. Would Card's the Memory of Earth give any insights into the recent Battlestar Galactica series??
post #77 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
Urban fantasy, especially the vampire-focused stuff, seems to have really taken off. I'm not sure if Buffy was a cause or an effect, but I always think of her as being in at the beginning, yk? (And, I never dreamed that the incredibly bizarre original movie was going to spin off into something so...widespread.)
Don't forget Ann Rice's novels. Interview With the Vampire came out in 1976. I don't know if her vampires directly inspired Joss Whedon's take on Buffy, but she certainly made a huge impact on her readers.
post #78 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by journeymom View Post
Don't forget Ann Rice's novels. Interview With the Vampire came out in 1976. I don't know if her vampires directly inspired Joss Whedon's take on Buffy, but she certainly made a huge impact on her readers.
Right. I forgot about her. I saw the movie (can't remember why), then decided to see if the book was any better. I thought it was worse, if anything. I just don't think I'm into the vampire thing. I don't object to vampires being part of a story or anything - just don't like the modern take on them.
post #79 of 111
Forgot to mention that the best vampire romance type novel I've read is Rhiannon Frater's Pretty When She Dies. You can get it free online in blog format. I have it on my kindle....the heroine wakes up in a shallow grave near a Texas college and then has to come to terms with her new vampire existence and goes on a road trip to find and get vengeance on her killer....definitely doesn't pull punches with the vampire/sex/horror genre connections, but truly a fun romp. Sort of an anti-Twilight. I like Frater's zombie novels too, if we're going to talk trashy-but-fun fantasy trends....

ETA according to the author's blog,it's been optioned for a movie so you may see it around ...

I read some Anne Rice, but could never get into her vampire books.
post #80 of 111
regarding Vampire books.. Sunshine by Robin McKinney is very good!
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