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***Weekly chat, Aug 1*** - Page 5

post #81 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixiekisses View Post
Actually, we don't have health insurance here in Scandinavia. We don't need it. Health care is mostly free because of our taxes.
Much the same as here in Canada. In many provinces (I'm in Ontario, for one) midwives are completely covered by the provincial health care so we don't pay a cent whether we want home or hospital birth. I guess if you are renting your own tub, you'd pay for something like that. And all dr and hospital visits, we don't pay. It's great, we do pay a lot in taxes but I'm totally fine with that. There are some things we do pay for, like doctor's notes and little things, then there are some things like physiotherapy, optometrists, dentists, massage therapy, chiropractors etc that are not covered but usually are by private health insurance which you can pay extra for or is sometimes offered by employers. Anyway, I feel very fortunate for this system. It's not perfect, but we have used it to our advantage when needed, and it's so great to not have to face a bill afterwards. My mom lived in the US for a few years and had thousands & thousands of dollars in health care bills.
post #82 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixiekisses View Post
And when you guys talk about the cost of a homebirth, what are you paying for exactly? It's the midwife yes?
In my area it ranges from 2500-3500 + labs and ultrasound if you choose to have one. My midwife is 3000.
post #83 of 91
My midwife is charging 2800 for her services. The birth kit is extra - but cheap. Labs and ultrasounds are not included.

I have to get my prenatal bloodwork done - with no insurance the lab was going to charge me $200! Ouch! I found this website where you order the tests you want done, pick the lab and pay online. Then you print out the papers you need to take into the lab with you. The test I needed is only $60 - awesome!! The best part is that I got a 15% off coupon so I even get to save some money - bringing it down to almost $50.
www.privatemdlabs.com
post #84 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixiekisses View Post
Actually, we don't have health insurance here in Scandinavia. We don't need it. Health care is mostly free because of our taxes. All health care for kids and pregnant women is totally free (including birth, postnatal care, and home visits from a nurse person after birth), all hospital care is free for everyone. Adults pay about 30$ for a doctors appointment. And about the same for the ER visit. Can you tell me what the Dutch model is? My friend majikfaerie in here said that where I live they follow the Dutch model, and I'm still not sure what that is.
By health insurance in Scandinavia, I meant national health. Where are you? I lived in Sweden (and briefly Norway) and I really miss it sometimes!

The Dutch model for pregnancy is care is ultra friendly to midwifery, with 30% of babies born at home (and covered by the health system), versus less than 1% in the USA. From what I know about their healthcare system, it's a little more flexible and market-oriented than Scandinavian national health, which might win over more American opinion. The government also provides incentives for private insurance companies to cover populations that are often left out in the cold in the USA, like lower income people, people with chronic health conditions, etc. majikfaerie can probably give you more and better info.
post #85 of 91
Thank you for answering, ladies, I must say 3000$ sounds crazy for a midwife. But it must be because they live of it? Here, there's not enough home births (small country, and not bad hospital/midwife run birth places), so they usually have other jobs as main income. Or are stay at home mums.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cactuspear View Post
By health insurance in Scandinavia, I meant national health. Where are you? I lived in Sweden (and briefly Norway) and I really miss it sometimes!

The Dutch model for pregnancy is care is ultra friendly to midwifery, with 30% of babies born at home (and covered by the health system), versus less than 1% in the USA. From what I know about their healthcare system, it's a little more flexible and market-oriented than Scandinavian national health, which might win over more American opinion. The government also provides incentives for private insurance companies to cover populations that are often left out in the cold in the USA, like lower income people, people with chronic health conditions, etc. majikfaerie can probably give you more and better info.
I'm an Aussie in Norway.
And thanks. Yeah, I should get around to ask mf more about it.
post #86 of 91
I just had a good opportunity to talk about my alopecia on my spotlight thread. I was hoping it would come up on there. I like filing people in when I can. If you're interested, check it out.
post #87 of 91
thanks for sharing trek. off to read!
post #88 of 91
Home births here run 3000-4500. I birthed my last baby at home, but CAN'T afford to this time. I can have my birth covered 100% with CNMs in the hospital. My dp is unemployed and I am self employed, and the economy has cut my income to less than a half of last year, (which was more than 30% down from the year before.) With 4 kids and no reliable income now or in the future, with all credit cards already maxed out...we can't cut any other corners, we live in a circle already. And it makes me cry.
So sometimes, with several thousand dollars, it isn't a matter of cutting back and saving up, when every penny's already allocated.
post #89 of 91
I went to the midwife on Thursday. We got to hear the baby. K was very excited. She helped the mw with my bloodwork even. And named the baby "Baby Nemo"... which we're going to try to talk her out of. The baby's heartrate is 150.
post #90 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by stormgirl View Post
So sometimes, with several thousand dollars, it isn't a matter of cutting back and saving up, when every penny's already allocated.
That's exactly what came to mind when I read previous post.
post #91 of 91
honestly with us we will be moving (a MAJOR expense when you are talking about basically starting over when it comes to a new apartment, new cars, appliances since we don't own the ones we have now, a lot of the furniture since what we have now is government owned) so 3000 might not sound bad but 3000 is almost 4 MONTHS pay for us. With the move it would be way to much. Plus I don't think any midwife is going to want to pick up a woman at 34-36 weeks pregnant. If we were to stay here (in Japan, on SOFA status) Id be looking at 2000 or so for the birth, plus birthing supplies, plus 100/hour for the interpreter since I'm not fluent in Japanese. There would also be additional cost because i live on an American base. Then Id have to go through the process of getting a Japanese birth certificate in order to get the Consulate report of birth which is a PAIN. I did it with my second (unexpected homebirth, delivered her myself with no one else around) daughter and thank goodness one of our friends could translate for us otherwise we were looking at almost a thousand in translation costs and another fee to have someone attend the court hearing so we could get the Japanese birth certificate. As it was we didn't have the Consulate report of birth until DD2 was almost 8 months old because of all the paperwork headache.
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