or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Any other diehard homeschoolers who decided to send their kids to school out there??
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Any other diehard homeschoolers who decided to send their kids to school out there?? - Page 5

post #81 of 101
Aw--I am really jealous of those of you who posted about how things are going so well. My dd is doing well academically, but is not happy in school and asks every morning (as soon as she opens her eyes) and afternoon when she can HS again. To make it worse, she has soooo much homework. It's not that she isn't keeping up, it is work specifically to do at home. Last Thursday, she had 3 hours. This week, I think the average was 2 hours without reading time.

Yesterday, her LA teacher suddenly decides that the kids have to write everything in cursive with no warning or prior instruction. DD said that the other kids didn't even learn cursive last year and are having to look a sheet of paper with the letters on it.

DD learned a slightly different version, and the teacher was giving her a hard time about it even though it was her first time trying the newer style. She came home so upset. Seriously, this has been an awful experience for both of us so far. They are already pressuring kids about the state testing next spring. It's not anything like this wonderful school we've been hearing about by our friends for the last few years.
post #82 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
My kids are 12 and 13. Making a decision to be consistent from this point forward makes sense to me. In our case, "never" is only 6 years.

Besides, we've tried everything! We've figured out what works for them.
Fair enough.

I almost came back and erased my last point - as, really, you were speaking in "I" statements about what worked for you, which is fine.

I only mentioned the "never" thing for those who are struggling with their decision (and used your wording to try to prove the point) that sometimes it is not as black and white as never. More of a public education annoucment on my part than a taking exception with your statement for your family.
post #83 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by emily31 View Post
Aw--I am really jealous of those of you who posted about how things are going so well. My dd is doing well academically, but is not happy in school and asks every morning (as soon as she opens her eyes) and afternoon when she can HS again.


How old are your kids?

Do circumstances mean they have to go to school - or is this something you are trying out?

Emotions and extreme issues aside - how long do you feel is a reasonable amount of time to give it a go? Some people believe till Xmas is a good try.

Have you spoken with the teachers - or tried other tactics to deal with school issues (ex: setting caps or opting out of homework if the amount is genuinely unreasonable).
post #84 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post


How old are your kids?

Do circumstances mean they have to go to school - or is this something you are trying out?

Emotions and extreme issues aside - how long do you feel is a reasonable amount of time to give it a go? Some people believe till Xmas is a good try.

Have you spoken with the teachers - or tried other tactics to deal with school issues (ex: setting caps or opting out of homework if the amount is genuinely unreasonable).
We are completing the 4th week of 4th grade (she turned 9 in June).
Dh really wants her to have the experience of at least trying school, and we have many friends who have been raving about this school for years. I'm thinking Christmas is a good time to withdraw, but he is really wanting her to go the entire year. DD isn't really giving dh the full extent of her unhappiness, so we'll see.

I have pretty much decided that I am going to cap her homework time to 40 minutes plus reading. I haven't gotten any email info from the teachers, so I am going to send a very polite note next week letting them know that 40 minutes will be all that I'm allowing and that we'll do the best we can with that time limit.
post #85 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by emily31 View Post
We are completing the 4th week of 4th grade (she turned 9 in June).
Dh really wants her to have the experience of at least trying school, and we have many friends who have been raving about this school for years. I'm thinking Christmas is a good time to withdraw, but he is really wanting her to go the entire year. DD isn't really giving dh the full extent of her unhappiness, so we'll see.

I have pretty much decided that I am going to cap her homework time to 40 minutes plus reading. I haven't gotten any email info from the teachers, so I am going to send a very polite note next week letting them know that 40 minutes will be all that I'm allowing and that we'll do the best we can with that time limit.
I also think the winter break is a good time to re-evaluate. The beggining of the year is really hard on kids. Esp. coming from homeschooling. There are new people, new rules, new schedules. There are always gonna be aspects that kids and parents alike hate. For instance my DS hates homework, he tries to fly through it so he can go play or whatever. However its 9:30 on a saturday morning here, and he is currently sitting in a chair practicing his handwriting skills..he just wants to do things on his own terms (not to mention hes avoiding cleaning his room which is the other thing the kid hates most in the world)
post #86 of 101
Ds will more than likely be attending kindergarten next fall. I was never opposed to public school completely, but I was definitely considering homeschooling. I am okay with my decision. Dh had expressed several times he preferred public school, and I have been weighing the options. My main concern is that ds may be labeled as something, too quiet, doesn't listen or something you know, but I have expressed to dh that if things don't go well ds will be pulled out of public school. I don't forsee that, I am the first to admit that I have practiced attachment parenting, and homeschooling just appeared to be an extension of that parenting method. I mean my ds is 4 and has never spent a night from me and is pretty much with me all the time. I am having more peace with this decision because i happen to be in one of the few schools in the district that still does half day kindergarten. If it were full day, i think i would be having way more anxiety about it. Ds will be one of the youngest in his grade, I don't plan to put him in any preschool programs, i am honestly looking at half day kindy as the trial run with public schooling for both of us. Granted we still have nearly a year, but I think for our family this will be the best thing, I have expressed to dh that i would eventually like to join the workforce, and I am the first to admit I don't do well multitasking and can't really handle a lot on my plate, ad in #2 coming along, I do feel like it will give ds the social stimulation he needs and will also give the lo and I some one on one bonding time that ds and i have had for going on 5 years.
post #87 of 101
ILoveMyBabyBird

I can relate! as much as I hate to admit it I am not superwoman. Juggling 4 kids, running a house, running a biz..by the end of the day I am soooo pooped I can barely fix the sheet on my bed..and as much as I hate to say it I am looking forward to my 4 yr old going off to K next yr. Not only to get a much needed break from being his constant source of entertainment but to spend more time with the baby, and maybe my house will be a bit cleaner!
post #88 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILoveMyBabyBird View Post
Ds will more than likely be attending kindergarten next fall. I was never opposed to public school completely, but I was definitely considering homeschooling. I am okay with my decision. Dh had expressed several times he preferred public school, and I have been weighing the options. My main concern is that ds may be labeled as something, too quiet, doesn't listen or something you know, but I have expressed to dh that if things don't go well ds will be pulled out of public school. I don't forsee that, I am the first to admit that I have practiced attachment parenting, and homeschooling just appeared to be an extension of that parenting method. I mean my ds is 4 and has never spent a night from me and is pretty much with me all the time. I am having more peace with this decision because i happen to be in one of the few schools in the district that still does half day kindergarten. If it were full day, i think i would be having way more anxiety about it. Ds will be one of the youngest in his grade, I don't plan to put him in any preschool programs, i am honestly looking at half day kindy as the trial run with public schooling for both of us. Granted we still have nearly a year, but I think for our family this will be the best thing, I have expressed to dh that i would eventually like to join the workforce, and I am the first to admit I don't do well multitasking and can't really handle a lot on my plate, ad in #2 coming along, I do feel like it will give ds the social stimulation he needs and will also give the lo and I some one on one bonding time that ds and i have had for going on 5 years.
dd1 just finished her first week of 1st gr at a ps (we hs for K).... for now its the best of both worlds. She doesn't have any hw, so all the hrs afterschool are free play/family time. I get a break during the day, have more time to plan/shop/make healtht meals, clean house etc. Things that just did not happen last yr w/ dc w/ me all day. her school is willing to work w/ families if they want to hs some subjects and do pt in school.... so that is a nice option.
post #89 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeteaa View Post
joybird...OT... I'm also in WA and I'm interested in hearing more about this alt. school? Last year we did a ppp, but it was in no way a school. If WA doesn't have charter or magnet schools, what is this alt school?
PM'd you.
post #90 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by emily31 View Post
I haven't gotten any email info from the teachers, so I am going to send a very polite note next week letting them know that 40 minutes will be all that I'm allowing and that we'll do the best we can with that time limit.
have you talked/emailed with the teacher at all about what is happening?

(Email has been my kids' teachers favorite form of communication)

When my then 10 DD started school, it took her HOURS to get through her homework. It was a combination of writing much slower than the other kids because she had done so much less writing as a homeschooler, and bringing home a lot of the work that she was supposed to do during the day. She wasn't sure she was doing things right, so she just brought EVERYTHING home.

It took her a few months, but she got the hang of everything and towards the end of the year could finish in homework in less than 30 mins.
post #91 of 101

Bumping to check-in...

Bunping this to see how it's going for everyone.

DD is a typical, well-adjusted and progressing kinder, so that's nice to know. She is having a minor night-time potty regression, but it is very infrequent and all else seems pretty okay, so I am just watching to see if it worsens. So far, she continues to chat us up about her day. And, we spend a lot of time writign words, reading, and playing school. All what we expected.

DS is really loving school and his friends, but is having a bit of trouble with the fact that he is a beginning reader and some of his good friends are quite advanced. I knew this would be the case as we had only begun 100 Easy Lessons last Spring, but I didn't know how it would play out. So far, he wants to read with DH or me all of the time. So, we do. He is enjoying reading and seems to understand that his goal (he has told us this, we didn't set it for him) is to "catch-up" to his friends. He is progressing really quickly, so I am not too worried about damage control should he not catch-up. We'll see.

I suppose we are a pretty typical Unschool turned school family at the ages we chose to go to school. But, I wanted to see how others are doing, too. I know the adjustment can be very difficult and I thought I would keep this thread going as a means of support for each of us, regardless of the issues (or lack-thereof).

How is everyone doing??
post #92 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by dillonandmarasmom View Post
How is everyone doing??
super.

DD#1 (asperger's and gifted) is doing great this year. This is her second year of school and last year was bumpy. Painfully bumpy. This year, however, she's happy, learning, and may even blossom.

DD#2 is doing fine with school, but broke her arm really badly, had surgery, is on pain meds, and is just having a bit of a rough go. School is both good and bad in this situation because it gives her something to think about and takes her mind off her arm, but sleep is a bit of an issue right now and she just isn't at her best. Each week is better, and hopefully this will soon just be a bad memory. The is her 3rd year of school.
post #93 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by dillonandmarasmom View Post
Bunping this to see how it's going for everyone.


DS is really loving school and his friends, but is having a bit of trouble with the fact that he is a beginning reader and some of his good friends are quite advanced. I knew this would be the case as we had only begun 100 Easy Lessons last Spring, but I didn't know how it would play out. So far, he wants to read with DH or me all of the time. So, we do. He is enjoying reading and seems to understand that his goal (he has told us this, we didn't set it for him) is to "catch-up" to his friends. He is progressing really quickly, so I am not too worried about damage control should he not catch-up. We'll see.



How is everyone doing??
dd1 who is in ps 1st grade was not reading at all 4 weeks ago, but is now able to sound out most normal phonic words. She would still rather be playing then working on reading at home to "catch-up" with her classmate. My main concern is that ALL they do in class is math, writing and reading... no science, social studies etc. Then she is send home with review work. We could be doing our own science projects.... BUT THERE IS NO TIME.
post #94 of 101
I still want the olders in school. I am the one whose teens just needed to go.

The school they are at is a charter school. Everyone there is nice and all. But academically, it is not so great. I am frustrated. I do not think it is the worst. But there are specific issues such as that everything is made in to a group project. I am talking even math assignments. One person does them, the rest put their names on it. I suspect it is supposed to be that they all do it and compare answers, but according to both my teens, it never works out that way. Same thing for all the classes. But the teachers are nice, the kids are nice. It is a complete 180 from last year at the nasty disgusting local public schools.

We are looking to transfer them ASAP though, as our children are college bound. There has to be a school that is good academically as well as having nice people. I hate to switch them around again at the high school level, but I really think it is needed.
post #95 of 101
Mixed reviews here.

Overall, she is happy to have people her age to socialise with regularly, but is less than impressed with the boring academics.

We give the staff a mixed report card. Some are wonderful and some are not.

She has been extra grouchy lately - and I sincerely hope it has nothing to do with school, but is typical moody 12 yr old angst.

Linda - I hope your DD heals quickly.
post #96 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post
Mixed reviews here.

Overall, she is happy to have people her age to socialise with regularly, but is less than impressed with the boring academics.

We give the staff a mixed report card. Some are wonderful and some are not.

She has been extra grouchy lately - and I sincerely hope it has nothing to do with school, but is typical moody 12 yr old angst.

Linda - I hope your DD heals quickly.
Someone did tell me that it is hard to go from homeschooling to regular school because at homeschool, you are always moving forward and doing meaningful learning and such. But in a regular classroom, you might spend 2 months on review because the rest of the class needs it. You just do not move forward or have the challenge or good quality academics in a classroom that you have at home.

My sister is a teacher and finishing her grad degree now. She faces this all the time. She is one of the more qualified teachers in our district. But then the administrators, who don't even work in the classrom, will dictate everything they do in the classroom and keep them from doing things that would be good. She wanted to do spelling this year and borrowed one of my spelling books to use as a resource. It is Spelling Workout, so it was not religious or anything. But the principal saw it and informed her of the district policy of not doing spelling. She knew they said that spelling is not a part of what the district does, she did not realize that she was outright banned from doing spelling. But then she will get informed throughout the year of constant changes they make to the curriculum and she just has to adapt on a moments notice. They are always adding things in, never taking away. And if the children do not all finish whatever is on the list, then she gets a bad review. So when a parent goes home and says they are not going to do something for whatever reason, the teacher gets in trouble.

In advanced math at the public school, the kids all had to hand make greeting cards. This is for high school preAP geometry. It took days for them to make it and has nothing to do with geometry. But, it is something that the district orders to be done. They said they have to add something extra in, a project basically, to make it preAP over regular. So the greeting cards were what they decided on. These are not handmade greeting cards to be sent out. These were simply thrown away when done by the teachers. It is that sort of non academic yuckity yuck stuff that is a complete waste of time that bothers those of us who want our children to get a real education. Not just do arts and crafts all day in high school math and such. (although arts and crafts in grade school is fine).
post #97 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by dillonandmarasmom View Post
Bunping this to see how it's going for everyone.

DD is a typical, well-adjusted and progressing kinder, so that's nice to know. She is having a minor night-time potty regression, but it is very infrequent and all else seems pretty okay, so I am just watching to see if it worsens. So far, she continues to chat us up about her day. And, we spend a lot of time writign words, reading, and playing school. All what we expected.

DS is really loving school and his friends, but is having a bit of trouble with the fact that he is a beginning reader and some of his good friends are quite advanced. I knew this would be the case as we had only begun 100 Easy Lessons last Spring, but I didn't know how it would play out. So far, he wants to read with DH or me all of the time. So, we do. He is enjoying reading and seems to understand that his goal (he has told us this, we didn't set it for him) is to "catch-up" to his friends. He is progressing really quickly, so I am not too worried about damage control should he not catch-up. We'll see.

I suppose we are a pretty typical Unschool turned school family at the ages we chose to go to school. But, I wanted to see how others are doing, too. I know the adjustment can be very difficult and I thought I would keep this thread going as a means of support for each of us, regardless of the issues (or lack-thereof).

How is everyone doing??
It seems as if we notice those that are doing things, and not those who are not. Know what I mean? So, if a hand full of children are reading well, we don't notice the other 90% who are not.

My 6 yr old was in public school last year and left the grade ahead of grade level, yet, was barely reading. In fact, he struggled with basic Mat sat on cat. It seemed as if all he noticed (and me too) the kids around him who seemed to read most things. But when I spoke to the teacher, she said it was only a small handful of kids who are ahead like that. Most are at my son's level or lower.

I hope that helps.
post #98 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
super.

DD#1 (asperger's and gifted) is doing great this year. This is her second year of school and last year was bumpy. Painfully bumpy. This year, however, she's happy, learning, and may even blossom.

DD#2 is doing fine with school, but broke her arm really badly, had surgery, is on pain meds, and is just having a bit of a rough go. School is both good and bad in this situation because it gives her something to think about and takes her mind off her arm, but sleep is a bit of an issue right now and she just isn't at her best. Each week is better, and hopefully this will soon just be a bad memory. The is her 3rd year of school.
Fantastic!~for DD1
Ouch! for DD2. That has got to be tough at her age. Hopefully she'll recover quickly and be herself again very soon.
post #99 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeteaa View Post
dd1 who is in ps 1st grade was not reading at all 4 weeks ago, but is now able to sound out most normal phonic words. She would still rather be playing then working on reading at home to "catch-up" with her classmate. My main concern is that ALL they do in class is math, writing and reading... no science, social studies etc. Then she is send home with review work. We could be doing our own science projects.... BUT THERE IS NO TIME.
Sorry to hear. Pretty frustrating.
post #100 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa1970 View Post
It seems as if we notice those that are doing things, and not those who are not. Know what I mean? So, if a hand full of children are reading well, we don't notice the other 90% who are not.

My 6 yr old was in public school last year and left the grade ahead of grade level, yet, was barely reading. In fact, he struggled with basic Mat sat on cat. It seemed as if all he noticed (and me too) the kids around him who seemed to read most things. But when I spoke to the teacher, she said it was only a small handful of kids who are ahead like that. Most are at my son's level or lower.

I hope that helps.
This is also true of DS's class. His two best friends happen to be advanced, and will tell everyone so as often as they can (e.g. "Look, I am doing my writing on "advanced" paper, and it's harder than yours"), which really should be addressed by the classroom teacher. I can only say so many times that DS is doing exactly what he should be and is getting better all the time. It doesn't mean as much to him coming from me, though. He needs to hear it there.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at School
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Any other diehard homeschoolers who decided to send their kids to school out there??