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Orthodox Christian Mamas - Page 3

post #41 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post
I tried your corn/beans/tomato soup Tradd, and I added some fresh cilantro. It was really good.
Glad you liked the soup!
post #42 of 126
Peeking in. I have been researching your faith for a while. Probably better to come hang with some of you instead.
post #43 of 126
post #44 of 126
Heh, good place for you then! We've got a bunch of widely read converts here, and I'm currently going through a two year program to become a certified lay catechist, so ask away!

AngelBee, what are you reading? Have you attended any Orthodox services, talked to a priest yet?

post #45 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
Heh, good place for you then! We've got a bunch of widely read converts here, and I'm currently going through a two year program to become a certified lay catechist, so ask away!

AngelBee, what are you reading? Have you attended any Orthodox services, talked to a priest yet?

Oh boy.....hmmm.....where to start....

I was raised Christian (Non-Den.) In 2000, I was confirmed Catholic. Was a practicing Catholic until 2007ish. As I started really reading the Bible and the Catholic Catechism. Then I started having alot of questions.

I like having some structure. I do NOT like when churches take a light stance on issues that are pretty well spelled out.

I guess right now I am trying to wrap my head around the main differences with Catholic and Orthodox beliefs.

So I have been cruising the web.

Do Orthodox believe Mary remained a virgin after Jesus birth? Random question but I am curious.
post #46 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelBee View Post
Oh boy.....hmmm.....where to start....

I was raised Christian (Non-Den.) In 2000, I was confirmed Catholic. Was a practicing Catholic until 2007ish. As I started really reading the Bible and the Catholic Catechism. Then I started having alot of questions.

I like having some structure. I do NOT like when churches take a light stance on issues that are pretty well spelled out.

I guess right now I am trying to wrap my head around the main differences with Catholic and Orthodox beliefs.

So I have been cruising the web.

Do Orthodox believe Mary remained a virgin after Jesus birth? Random question but I am curious.
Mary ever Virgin? You bet your booty she is!

Great website - the forums at Monachos.net. No jurisdictional wrangling. The Orthodox-Convert list on Yahoo is good. Stay far, far away from the Orthodox-Forum list on Yahoo. Much jurisdictional wrangling and one needs a VERY strong stomach for this one!

Check your PMs! I sent you one earlier.
post #47 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
Mary ever Virgin? You bet your booty she is!

Great website - the forums at Monachos.net. No jurisdictional wrangling. The Orthodox-Convert list on Yahoo is good. Stay far, far away from the Orthodox-Forum list on Yahoo. Much jurisdictional wrangling and one needs a VERY strong stomach for this one!

Check your PMs! I sent you one earlier.
Thanks for the info.

Weird question.....why is she still a virgin? What is the purpose of marriage if to be celebate? Honestly a confusing issue for me.
post #48 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelBee View Post
Weird question.....why is she still a virgin? What is the purpose of marriage if to be celebate? Honestly a confusing issue for me.
Short answer - I am sure other Orthomoms can provide further and better info...
Marriage is not normally celibate, but this was a special circumstance. According to patristic writings, the Mother of God took a private vow of lifelong virginity and dedicated herself to working for the Temple. Her parents supported this choice, and for practical reasons arranged for her to be betrothed to a devout elderly widower, Joseph. Betrothal at the time did not mean simply being engaged as it does today; it was a binding relationship, sort of the first step of the marriage bond, but understood to exclude sexual relations. Given that unmarried girls did not normally live alone in those days, Joseph was meant to provide a stable home in which Mary could carry out her life of celibacy and service after her very elderly parents had died.
post #49 of 126
That...plus, even if one does not believe that Mary intended to remain a virgin after marriage you gotta admit, giving birth to God is kinda a game changer. They were already bound. They were betrothed which would have required a divorce. a divorce joseph was entitled to after Mary became pregnant,. He intended to be kind and divorce her quietly. This was huge in and of itself. but instead after a chat with an Angelic host he had a change of heart. Also not a typical route marriage takes. The angle said "here is what you are going to do" and Joseph did it. And in this way God provided a home and means of support for Mary and Jesus. Even if they had planned on having sexual relations in the beginning all of this changed the form and function of the marriage relationship.

Also as an Orthodox Christian I do not believe sex or even procreation is the primary function of marriage. I believe the primary function of marriage is a sacrament that helps us to work out our salvation. For Joseph and Mary they both played a role in raising Jesus and contributing in that way to the salvation of our souls. Lets say, that from the very beginning there was to be no sex involved...perhaps Joseph was past that time in his life where he was able, what would be the point in getting married? Mary needed someone to support her. Joseph needed someone to care for him in his old age. It would be a win win arrangement. Not everything has to be about sex. If Joseph was supporting her Mary would have been able to go about her business serving God without worry for her future. Both of them contributing to the work Mary was doing. one by doing the work and one by providing for her financial needs.
post #50 of 126
Thank you both for answering. I appreciate it.
post #51 of 126

Topic change... :-)

 

I am a recent convert & am trying to prepare for my first Nativity fast. Thing is, I'm pregnant, and I'm not sure how to go about it. I know there are vegan and veggie pregnant mamas, but I'm not vegan or veggie regularly and don't feel equipped to suddenly be so for 40 straight days of pregnancy. (I have been doing veggie Wed/Fri without any problem.) Also, DH is not Orthodox, and we have two young children, so I'm trying to balance my own rule w/ respect for my family and peace in the home. :-)

 

I have an appointment with my priest to discuss this on Thursday--he doesn't want to do it over email--but in the mean time, I'm not sure what to do starting Monday re: food. I wonder if anyone has been in a similar boat and could share their fasting rule while pregnant, just so I could have some ideas of how to give it my best shot for the beginning of next week until I talk with my priest. Aside from food, I know I want to focus on prayer and guarding my tongue this fast.

 

Many thanks!

post #52 of 126

Hi Orthodox Mamas:

 

For those of you looking for fasting-friendly recipes, I thought I'd recommend two books that I came across in my search for Egyptian recipes.  The first, "Dining on the Nile," is written by an Egyptian Copt named Sally Elias Hanna--so pretty much every recipe has a fasting variation.  The second is called "Nile Style."

 

A lot of the regular food that Egyptians consume is vegan--so you'll find recipes for fuul medames (fava beans stewed with tomatoes, onions, garlic), koshari (lentils, rice, and macaroni mixed together and served with garlicky tomato sauce), mashi (stuffed veggies--anything from grape leaves to tomatoes, onions, zucchini, etc.), masa'a (like ratatouile), falafel, shorbat ads (red lentil soup), etc. 

 

If you're interested in any of these and want the recipes, let me know. smile.gif

post #53 of 126

Thanks!

post #54 of 126

Have you talked to your priest? As my priest and others I know have said, your baby IS your *fast*, your podvig (spiritual struggle) as they say in Russian. So, it comes down to this:

 

If you're pregnant or nursing, NO fasting (involving food). PERIOD.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bax View Post

Topic change... :-)

 

I am a recent convert & am trying to prepare for my first Nativity fast. Thing is, I'm pregnant, and I'm not sure how to go about it. I know there are vegan and veggie pregnant mamas, but I'm not vegan or veggie regularly and don't feel equipped to suddenly be so for 40 straight days of pregnancy. (I have been doing veggie Wed/Fri without any problem.) Also, DH is not Orthodox, and we have two young children, so I'm trying to balance my own rule w/ respect for my family and peace in the home. :-)

 

I have an appointment with my priest to discuss this on Thursday--he doesn't want to do it over email--but in the mean time, I'm not sure what to do starting Monday re: food. I wonder if anyone has been in a similar boat and could share their fasting rule while pregnant, just so I could have some ideas of how to give it my best shot for the beginning of next week until I talk with my priest. Aside from food, I know I want to focus on prayer and guarding my tongue this fast.

 

Many thanks!

post #55 of 126

bax, I've been either pregnant or nursing for the past 6+years and especially while preggers I have not fasted (as in: vegan diet).   It will be interesting to know what your priest says. :)

 

post #56 of 126

In my (non-Orthodox) fasting while nursing, I have one thing that I do in particular.  I always try and drink a big glass of milk after the kids go to bed, but usually it is chocolate milk.  I make it really chocolaty, and it is a bit of a ritual.  When I fast, I still drink the milk, but plain.  I find it almost embarrassingly difficult to actually stick with this.

post #57 of 126

Bluegoat,  oh the chocolate thing is soooo hard for me!!!  I just decided that I am going to try to avoid dark chocolate for the Nativity Fast, and I've had quite a few pieces of that this afternoon---eyesroll.gif in preparation for tomorrow going cold turkey.  ha ha.  but it is really difficult for me!  Maybe we should start some choco-support group in this thread during the fast!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post

In my (non-Orthodox) fasting while nursing, I have one thing that I do in particular.  I always try and drink a big glass of milk after the kids go to bed, but usually it is chocolate milk.  I make it really chocolaty, and it is a bit of a ritual.  When I fast, I still drink the milk, but plain.  I find it almost embarrassingly difficult to actually stick with this.

post #58 of 126

Technically dark chocolate is allowable even during strict fasts.  Milk chocolate however is not.  My priest forbids women to fast while pregnant or nursing.   My children do not do a full fast but even though they are allowed dairy, I do not allow them to have non fasting treats like cookies, candy and ice cream.  Only what they *need* (we were vegans for a while so I don't believe they need anything non fasting but lunches are so much easier if I can use cheese and eggs and if my priest says do it who am I to argue).  Non fasting treats must wait until after the fast (besides keeping the spirit of the fast it is terrible for me to have those things in the house while trying to avoid them).  I think giving up the chocolate in your chocolate milk is a nice nod towards the fast while still taking what your body needs.

 

Wow, It has been a big week in my house.  My kids went to confession.  A lovely family has begun going to our church and their children go to confession every week.  Even the four year old!!  Knowing that there would be other children there confessing really helped my children get over their fear of going.   My 14 and 10 year old went about 2 1/2 years ago before they were baptized and the little one had never been.  The middle one refused to go but 2 out of 3 is not bad.  It was so sweet.  And having them finally get into the habit of confessing feels like a huge weight off my shoulders.  

 

AND, on Tuesdays I get to go venerate the Kursk Root Icon.  I am so excited.  I never get to do anything like this because of my awful work schedule.  It keeps me from so much in the life of the church.  But glory to God! it is on a Tuesday, my day off!  Everything fell into place quickly for my friend and I to travel to Minneapolis ( I would not have been able to make the trip myself.  it is  4 1/2 hour drive and the service will not be over until late.  and I just don't drive in the cities...)  to attend the prayer service and veneration of the miracle working icon.  Pray that we would have safe travels and that I will survive the next day at work.

post #59 of 126

Wow! Excellent! I went to Confession myself on Saturday (I tend to go about once a month). Did the family just move into your area? I know that in the Russian Orthodox tradition, it's common practice for kids over 7 or so and adults to go to Confession each time before receiving Communion.

 

Which church will the Kursk Root icon be at? She will be in my area around Thanksgiving. I hope it's the day after Thanksgiving so I can go downtown to the church where she will be and not have to deal with driving down after work, etc. I've venerated her once before. Incredible experience. It was a small molieben at a Russian church here and it was quite by chance that I was there (I was having dinner with the priest and his matushka).

 

Prayers goin' up!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka View Post

Technically dark chocolate is allowable even during strict fasts.  Milk chocolate however is not.  My priest forbids women to fast while pregnant or nursing.   My children do not do a full fast but even though they are allowed dairy, I do not allow them to have non fasting treats like cookies, candy and ice cream.  Only what they *need* (we were vegans for a while so I don't believe they need anything non fasting but lunches are so much easier if I can use cheese and eggs and if my priest says do it who am I to argue).  Non fasting treats must wait until after the fast (besides keeping the spirit of the fast it is terrible for me to have those things in the house while trying to avoid them).  I think giving up the chocolate in your chocolate milk is a nice nod towards the fast while still taking what your body needs.

 

Wow, It has been a big week in my house.  My kids went to confession.  A lovely family has begun going to our church and their children go to confession every week.  Even the four year old!!  Knowing that there would be other children there confessing really helped my children get over their fear of going.   My 14 and 10 year old went about 2 1/2 years ago before they were baptized and the little one had never been.  The middle one refused to go but 2 out of 3 is not bad.  It was so sweet.  And having them finally get into the habit of confessing feels like a huge weight off my shoulders.  

 

AND, on Tuesdays I get to go venerate the Kursk Root Icon.  I am so excited.  I never get to do anything like this because of my awful work schedule.  It keeps me from so much in the life of the church.  But glory to God! it is on a Tuesday, my day off!  Everything fell into place quickly for my friend and I to travel to Minneapolis ( I would not have been able to make the trip myself.  it is  4 1/2 hour drive and the service will not be over until late.  and I just don't drive in the cities...)  to attend the prayer service and veneration of the miracle working icon.  Pray that we would have safe travels and that I will survive the next day at work.

post #60 of 126

Yes they just moved to the area from Virginia.  The mother is Russian.  Very sweet family.  

 

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