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Hospital birth with twins

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
Tell me (or link me to) your hospital birth with twins story. I'd also love to hear what you expected, how things really turned out, what you wish you had done differently, anything you think I should know.
post #2 of 40
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...andrew+william
post #3 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaChicken View Post
Thanks! I'll read it and be back with any questions.
post #4 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaChicken View Post
OK...

1. When you say "recuperate" from the Mag Sulfate, what do you mean? What did it do to you (besides stop the contractions)?

2. Were you able to room in with twins?
post #5 of 40
Subbing.
post #6 of 40
I had a scheduled c due to Twin B flipping back and forth in my last 2-3 weeks from head down to breech position. I was extremely conservative about my pregnancy and (a) didn't want to find myself in an emergency c situation (due to Twin B flipping from head down to breech after Twin A delivered) or due to other complications and (b) couldn't have lived with myself if something happened with Twin B (prolapse/early placenta detachment) that a c-section could have prevented, despite those risks being minimal.

My c-section and recovery from the c-section itself was remarkably non-painful, with the following caveats:

(a) I am what is called a bad "prick" (ha-ha), in that it is very hard to draw blood or put in an iv line. I had informed everyone of that in advance, especially as I was at a teaching hospital and wanted a very experienced hand on the needle. I am NEVER believed on this point by anyone medical, and ended up being stuck 7 times before they found a useable vein for the IV. They promptly lost that vein in the process of transferring me from the guerney onto the operating table, and only the senior anesthiologist was able to procure a useable vein in the end.

(b) Had a bad reaction to one of the drugs used during the c-section (one of the newer antibiotics was suspected). Heartrate/pressure dropped and the sensation was like a ton of bricks on my chest making it difficult to breathe. They addressed the issue quickly, and I was never in the danger zone. However, as a result I do not really remember the birth of my Twin B (struggling to breathe at the time).

(c) Some vaginal hemorraging immediately after the c-section (several pints of blood lost, but no need for a transfusion).

(d) An unusual complication after the c-section called Ogilvie's Syndrome post-partum (which is when your colon stops functioning). After abdominal surgery, your bowels shut down as a protective mechanism, and are the last part to "wake up" after the surgery. In addition, the narcotic painkillers can also wreak havoc on the bowels' normal operation. Thus, being "stopped up" after a c-section is not terribly, terribly unusual. They have a gas pill they like to give and recommend lots of walking to wake up the bowels. However, my situation with the Ogilvie's Syndrome was much more unusual and serious (and my complaints got ignored as being a standard embolus after c-section).

A first-year resident really may have saved my life. She had stopped by as one of the final medical visits before they planned to discharge me to discuss (of all things) my plans for post-partum contraception. I mentioned to her that there had been no progress on my bowel situation (I was so filled with air that when she tapped on my belly it sounded like a drum and I still looked pregnant) and both my husband and I were very concerned and had been ignored by everyone else. She FINALLY, FINALLY was one who ordered an X-ray. Two hours after the X-ray, a surgical team stopped by since the films indicated that I was a good candidate for my bowel bursting.

My advice before going in for a c-section and during the process:

(1) Have contingency plans prepared: what will happen if you are discharged before the babies, AND what will happen with the babies if they are discharged before you (which is what occurred in my situation).

(2) Hold off eating solid food for as long as possible after the c-section or eat as lightly as possible.

(3) Walk, walk, walk after the c-section! Limit use of narcotics as much as possible.

(4) The squeaky wheel gets the grease. However, pregnant/post-partum women are frequently viewed as being unbalanced or on the edge of being unbalanced. You need your husband or partner advocating for you very firmly and very repeatedly (but NOT emotionally). If you don't think its normal, its probably not and don't let the nurses blow you off. Also, if more than one team is involved in your care (at one point I had ob, surgery, gastro and medicine teams involved) make sure you understand who is coordinating your case amongst the teams and make sure that person is being responsive to your needs and answering your questions about which course of treatment is being followed and why.

(5) Be aware that ob specializes in one thing -- ob, and its surprising the amount of ignorance they can have on other topics. After being diagnosed with the Ogilvie's Syndrome, ob was still ordering enemas for me. The gastro guys basically straight up said afterwards that an enema was of absolutely no use with my syndrome and would not "re-start" my colon. The other teams felt the necessity to defer to ob (despite, in the case of gastro, not agreeing with the course of treatment), and I felt that ob did not involve me enough in the decision-making process and in the discussion of my options.
post #7 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
OK...

1. When you say "recuperate" from the Mag Sulfate, what do you mean? What did it do to you (besides stop the contractions)?

2. Were you able to room in with twins?
1. Mag sulfate is evil. I've it twice with the same reaction, first with DS1 for pre-e and then with the twins for PTL. It is a muscle relaxer and it makes me twitchy, restless leg, foggy head, blurred vision, tanks my blood pressure, chills with hot flashes, etc. It takes two weeks for it to fully leave my system. My mom stayed with me because I couldn't stand up long enough to cook. That said, it did it's job both times.

2. YES! They were in nicu for a short time and then in my room. They shared a room in the nicu. In my room the nurses put them in the same basinet. Our nurse was sweet and recommended that I try having them share a bed or even share my bed when we got home. She said it would make nursing them so much easier if they were in bed with me. The lactation consultant asked me to come volunteer at the hospital or show up for new mom meetings because they didn't get many twin moms who nursed.

The nurses did offer to take the boys from 3am to 6am to let me sleep, but they weren't pushy about it. I should have taken them up on it.

Overall, an amazing experience!
post #8 of 40
Subbing and looking forward to more stories or links
post #9 of 40
post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
Tell me (or link me to) your hospital birth with twins story. I'd also love to hear what you expected, how things really turned out, what you wish you had done differently, anything you think I should know.
What I expected: I wanted to have a vaginal delivery, but was told by my OB that they would let me try it with an epidural. Ultrasounds showed Twin B was larger than twin A, and twin B was also breach.

How things really turned out: No epidural, natural delivery because nurses did not administer the epidural in time. I screamed (more like blood curdling screams) during the delivery of twin A. In hindsight, I was really scared. In my mind, I thought I only had 2 choices - 1) vaginal delivery with epidural 2) C-section. I did not expect a vaginal birth, no drugs. I was scared of what was happening, and did not know what to expect. Because the labour came on so fast, and I delivered both babies very quickly (they pulled out twin B because her heart rate was dropping and they could not turn her) I ended up with severe post partum hemorraging. They tried to slow down the blood flow with medication via rectum and also needles in the uterus. I lost a lot of blood and needed a blood transfusion.

What I wish I knew: I wish I could have mentally prepared myself for a vaginal birth, no drugs. I was a basket case. And, I was not prepared for the post partum hemorraging either.
post #11 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoisLane View Post
Thanks for posting this!

And holy crow, why were there 11 people at your delivery?!?!? Is that typical?
post #12 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kat's Mommy View Post
I ended up with severe post partum hemorraging. They tried to slow down the blood flow with medication via rectum and also needles in the uterus. I lost a lot of blood and needed a blood transfusion.

What I wish I knew: I wish I could have mentally prepared myself for a vaginal birth, no drugs. I was a basket case. And, I was not prepared for the post partum hemorraging either.

I've heard that the post partum bleeding is worse with twins. Is there anything to do preemptively to help with this?
post #13 of 40
I was able to be the doula this week for a natural twin birth. It took place in a hospital and the mom declined the epidural that her OB wanted her to have in case there had to be a C-section. Both babies were born vaginally with no complications.

I would highly recommend having a doula for a twin birth.
post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
Thanks for posting this!

And holy crow, why were there 11 people at your delivery?!?!? Is that typical?
Head count in the room while I birthed:
midwife and two nurses- primary team
anesthesiologist
ob
surgical nurse
two nurses for twins
two peds for twins
tech for respitory therapy
DH and me
post #15 of 40
The birth of my boys happened totally by surprise, and very early. In the week or 2 leading up to their birth I had been sick, in particular, with a GI virus that gave me awful poops for daaayyysss. This left me super dehydrated and made preterm contractions start. I went to the hospital at one point because of the early contractions and was put on an IV to rehydrate and given terbutaline for the contractions. I stayed for a few hours, then went home. I was told to just let the diarrhea run its course, and call if the contractions got regular again.

Then one night a few days later, the hubs and I were walking into the pharmacy located at the hospital to pick up some meds, and as we're entering the building, I stop and say: "Either I just peed myself, or my water just broke!!" Uhmmm, say what?!?!

We head directly to the L&D floor, and sure enough, it was a broken sac. I'm admitted and taken care of to try to (a) keep the babies in for as long as possible, while (b) reducing the risk of infection, too-early delivery, and other complications. I was given terbutaline to relax the contractions, and steroids to hasten lung development. The kids are only 30 weeks, 4 days at this point.

I actually had to be transferred to another hospital that could take earlier babies. The one I started at could only handle babies 32 weeks +, so I got my first ambulance ride that night! Settled in the new hospital, we stayed overnight in my new home. I would be stuck in the hospital until I deliver because of the broken sac. It could be for one day, several days, or possibly weeks. My cervix was closed, so we just had to wait and see.

By the next afternoon though, I'm having more frequent and intense contractions, which terbutaline does little to tame. Then we find out the cervix is dilated 3 cm -- this dilation happened in about a 2 hour time span. The doctor suggests an epidural to slow things down, as well as pain relief (of course). I hesitate because I don't want it to lead to the epidural-pitocin downward spiral (my first choice would be to deliver naturally, but I know that there are extra risks with twins, so this is an issue I had been struggling with the entire pregnancy). Finally, after much debate and consideration, I agree to see the anesthesiologist. I take the epidural because the labor is progressing quickly at this point. Both babies are vertex, so I opt for vaginal delivery + epidural so that on the off-chance something goes wrong after the first is delivered, an emergency c/s will be possible without general anesthesia. It was a very difficult choice, but ultimately I thought the risk of having to be knocked out completely in case of an emergency c/s was worse than taking an epi. So, by the time the epidural is in there is NO cervix left. This determined baby is coming out!

I start pushing at about 10:15 pm or so, and an hour later, Baby A is born! I hadn't gone to any childbirth classes yet, but I've seen a lot of videos, and read a lot of stuff, so I kind of knew what I was doing!

One doctor was there to guide Baby B downward, to make sure he didn't flip around, and he didn't! He slid right out on the heels of Baby A with one push, 5 minutes apart.

Sadly, since they were so early (30w5d) they had to be kept in the NICU. This part sucks b/c I was really looking forward to the immediate bonding and BF'ing right after delivery. But that's life. Their lungs were too immature to be out of the NICU, and so they had to stay there for what turned out to be a grueling six weeks.

But I made the most of the NICU time. I was there for 7-12 hours every day, I kagarooed them all the time, practiced BF'ing when they were ready, and got to be pretty pro at tandem nursing! It was helpful to have the nurses around because they were excellent teachers and assistants at helping me learn how to do it. I also got to learn all about infant care from the nurses and doctors, so I was pretty prepared once I got them home. I never felt clueless at home, like I imagine lots of new parents do.

The best part is that now we have our babies here safe and sound! And they're growing and developing splendidly!

Photobucket of Babies: http://photobucket.com/VilloriaBoys

Anthony & Vincent (little Tony & Vinny).
3.2 lbs, 16.5", and 3.5 lbs, 16.5"
5/21/10 at 11:12 pm and 11:17 pm.
post #16 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
Thanks for posting this!

And holy crow, why were there 11 people at your delivery?!?!? Is that typical?
I had a similar amount of people:
2 ob's - one catching and one guiding
2 nurses attending me
1 surgical nurse
1 anesthisiologist
1 neonatologist and 2 Nicu nurses per baby (6 ppl total)
the hubs
13 in all, iirc.
post #17 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
I would highly recommend having a doula for a twin birth.
I really want one. As a matter of fact, it was my counterdemand when DH said he would not be comfortable with a twin homebirth. But unfortunately, I can't find one to in my area. Want to come down to Williamsport?
post #18 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaChicken View Post
Head count in the room while I birthed:
midwife and two nurses- primary team
anesthesiologist
ob
surgical nurse
two nurses for twins
two peds for twins
tech for respitory therapy
DH and me
Whoa. This is definitely something for me to ask about. One of the things I hated most about my previous hospital birth was people yelling at me about how to push. In my mind, the more people there, the more people who might try bossing me around. I hate that.
post #19 of 40
Thread Starter 
Jane91 and ShanaV, thank you for sharing your stories as well! I'll admit, they're really hard for me to read-- I'd like to believe I'm going to hold onto these babies until at least Thanksgiving (I'm due 12/6) and have a natural vaginal birth, but I know I need to "expect the best and prepare for the worse." I'm also wondering how I would possibly negotiate a c section and/or a NICU stay with 4 other children at home.
post #20 of 40
i get driven nuts when i think about folks telling me to push or do things like that, i have the distinct feeling i may end up cussing a few folks right out of my room if they dont keep their mouths shut
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