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letting go of the landline pro and con?

post #1 of 48
Thread Starter 
Thinking of making the jump to cell only. Landline is $35 a month and would be lovely to drop that fee. Pros and cons please? Alternatives?
post #2 of 48
We dropped ours a year ago? The only con was that 911 wasn't tied to an actual house... but then, before we ditched the landline, we had time warner's phone setup which had the same issue. The only other issue is occasionally I lose my cell phone and I don't have a land line to call it with to find it Also, if we left the kids with a babysitter, we'd have to leave one of our phones with her... but it's always my mom who always has her cell with her...

It was also a pain remembering to switch all the things (credit card accounts, etc) to the new number.

One thing I've heard of people doing, though, is adding an additional cell line (for like $10 or whatever) on their plan, and just leaving it at home all the time... You can even take the current land-line number and have them attach it to a cell instead, so you keep the phone number (and thus side-step most of the issues surrounding dropping it). It'd probably still drop your bill...
post #3 of 48
i dropped it a year or two ago. i've thought about the 911 thing and the babysitter thing, but neither have been a problem for me yet. it's also kind of weird to me that people can't "look me up" because cell phone numbers aren't listed - weird, but nice!
post #4 of 48
We dropped our landline in 1999.

Pros: I've completely forgotten about how bad telemarketing can be.

Cons: Not quite sure what we're going to do when the kid gets to phone-desiring age. He'll probably end up with his own cell phone earlier than many others deem "appropriate".

And seriously, I've been living without a landline for 11 years now, and I can't think of any other con.
post #5 of 48
I can think of a few cons for relying on only a cell phone.

1) They are not 100% reliable: what if the electricity goes out and your phone isn't charged and then dies. What if there is a storm and the reception goes out on the phone. What if the phone breaks or gets water damaged?

2) Cell phones and cell phone plans are expensive and it seems to me that you would be replacing a cell phone more often than a land line.

3) Cell phones haven't been proven to be completly safe for the consumers who use them ALL the time. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/f...isk/cellphones

the link doesn't say that they do cause cancer but that they don't really know what the radio waves do to our health.

I personally would not use only a cell phone.
post #6 of 48
We haven't had a landline in ten years or so....

I've found our cell phones to be a lot more reliable than our landline was, to be honest. On the off chance that the electricity would go out just as both of our cell phones were dying (which has never happened, and we try to charge them as soon as they show lower than full so I don't think it will) we have a car charger and a portable electronics charger.

Cell phones can be expensive, if you want all the bells and whistles. However, if you're going for basic stuff they're pretty cheap - $20 or so, or freecycle one, or sign a new contract and get a new one.
post #7 of 48
i havent had one in lke 8 years, never wish i had one
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post #8 of 48
The only reason I have a landline is because I live in Mexico and I want easy access to emergency services. However, I've recently been informed that if I dial Mexican emergency services from my US cell phone, it will still connect me. Even if one of my kids dials and forgets to dial the Mexican number but 911 instead, it will connect to Mexican emergency services. So, we're probably going to drop it soon. We have literally never used it in the year and a half we've lived here. We hadn't had a land line in the US for many, many years and it was never a problem. The only thing is that I'm finding that my kids have very poor phone skills - they never have to answer the phone, take a message, etc. DH and I always have our phones physically on us, so they never get the opportunity to practice. That's something I think I need to go out of my way to work on for them. Also, when my kids get ready to really want to call/recieve calls, they will probably get their own cell phones younger than I otherwise would choose to.
post #9 of 48
I hadn't had a landline in 10 years and saw no reason to ever have one. I talk on the cell a lot and don't go over my minutes.

We had to get a landline when we bought our new apartment because the buzzer system downstairs is tied to a phone number, and it's too annoying to have it linked to one of our cells in case that person isn't home when someone comes over. So we got a stupid landline and I hate it! Doesn't cost me extra it's bundled with our FIOS (which is less than our cable bill was before with no phone) but it rings nonstop with telemarketers despite being on the no call list.
post #10 of 48
~ We dropped our landline in Nov or Dec 2009.

~ Our cell phones are not reliable in our home. Never have been no matter which provider nor which physical phone. Many friends/family have tried, too.

~ We tried out MagicJack in Sept or Oct 2009 and didn't like it. Several reasons, which I've stated in numerous threads on that topic, but basically 1) Too much static and/or older relatives could not hear us; and 2) My laptop had to become tethered to the phone and always be on (does not work well for my lifestyle). Returned it for a full refund.

~ We purchased an Ooma at Costco in Oct or Nov 2009 (less than $200 out the door). LOVE IT! Paid once and haven't had to pay a dime since. Has already paid for itself and our landline had been down as low as possible ($22/mo) for over a year (no features at all; just the basic service). People who pay more per month for landline service recoup their costs even faster.

Benefits of Ooma for us:
~ We purposely got a new number and all of our telemarketing and charity calls have STOPPED. NONE now. ZERO!!!! (We were already on the DO NOT CALL list and renewed every few years. Doesn't stop all unwanted calls.) Ooma doesn't participate in the phone directories anywhere. Our number doesn't show up on any websites of any kind because it isn't public record. I absolutely LOVE this!
* Minor drawback to this was we had to change our phone number with the people we DO want to call us or have the new number. I found this to be a positive, however, because we got to choose who got the new number.

~ We kept our house phone system and it works perfectly with Ooma. Ooma has free voicemail and a bunch of other features, but we like our house phone system and were happy to keep it fully functional. Our DD will be approaching phone usage age soon and this was a factor in our decision in finding a compatible system with our parenting philosophies. Babysitters and houseguests can use the phone as normal and they don't even know it isn't regular AT&T service. 911 calls work just as before (you must enter your address when starting up Ooma) and I manually added our new phone number to our county's reverse 911 call system online (fire and earthquake country here).

~ All calls are free! Local and domestic long-distance calls are completely free. No bill whatsoever any more! (If you need international, the rates are very reasonable.) The government has decided to charge the communication taxes and such to everyone with any kind of phone, so that will go into effect our second or third year of owning the Ooma. Many other features are free, too. We have more features with our phone service now than we ever did with AT&T landline service. One *can* choose to add fee-based features, also. We haven't.

FWIW - Cordless phones (on a traditional landline) won't work in a power outage, either. The solution for anyone is to keep a basic corded phone in the house and plug it into the phone jack in an emergency (or keep it there all the time). You can still make 911 calls even if you don't have landline service.

The biggest con to Ooma is the upfront cost, which not everyone can afford to pay like that. We were also concerned about the viability and stability of the company, which is why we purchased at Costco. They have an excellent return policy and are known for doing business with reputable companies. We are past the point of recouping our upfront costs and we have had all good experiences with Ooma, even having to call for help (once) or hiccups in their system (twice and they informed US). Excellent customer service.

Just another option to consider.... and no I don't work for Ooma or anything like that.... just a happy customer for life!!!
post #11 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juvysen View Post
One thing I've heard of people doing, though, is adding an additional cell line (for like $10 or whatever) on their plan, and just leaving it at home all the time... You can even take the current land-line number and have them attach it to a cell instead, so you keep the phone number
That is a great idea. I've wondered what to do if we drop the landline and how that involves the kids. I guess the answer is "house phone".
post #12 of 48
I don't have a land line, both me and my partner have cell phones. Here are my thoughts:
It's true that if you call 911 from a cell phone, you have to tell them your address, they wont be able to find it. For this reason, I have my address and directions to my house written down clearly and have it in a sheet protector, I set it out on the kitchen counter if someone is babysitting.
If you can't find your cell phone (because it's stuck underneath a couch cushion or something), you'll need another phone to call it from, which sucks if you're home alone.
How old are your children? If they are ever home alone, they need to have a cell phone if there is no land line.
I'm not the type to spend a long time talking on the phone, but if you are, it might cost more to have a cell phone.
post #13 of 48
I've never had a landline & it's never been an issue. We do make sure to keep both cell phones always charged & in a certain place when we're home (i.e. never just leave it on the couch or something).

When my mom called to cancel her landline, they offered to drop her to something ridiculously low like $10 a month to keep her as a customer. So she ended up keeping the landline. Maybe you'll have the same luck
post #14 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auroara Bobcat View Post
1) They are not 100% reliable: what if the electricity goes out and your phone isn't charged and then dies. What if there is a storm and the reception goes out on the phone. What if the phone breaks or gets water damaged?
Your landline works if your electricity is out? That never seemed to be the case around here, it always seemed if the electricity was out, the landline phone service was dead as a doornail too. And during my childhood at least, storms took out phone service even more often than they took down electricity. In the year prior to us dumping landline service (in 1999) I recall our landline being down due to storms several times.
post #15 of 48
Thread Starter 
One thing that bothers me is that my dd is getting to that age when she wants to be on the phone with her friends. I am not comfortable with her having her own cell phone, yet (can't really afford it, either.) and having the landline where I will often be the one answering it seems like a good idea. One of her friends got a cell phone and immediately started being more sneaky and secretive. May not be an issue at all for my dd, but I do like to know what is going on with her without invading her privacy...
post #16 of 48
We have never used a land line.

We got a free land line phone number with our cable, so we plugged a phone in. It got non-stop sales calls at all hours. It was terrible! After three days we unplugged it and never looked back.

We haven't missed having a land line phone at all!
post #17 of 48
Sometimes I also misplace my cell in my house and have to use my landline to call it!
post #18 of 48
I dropped my landline 2-3 years ago and never looked back. I have a flat rate cell phone plan (unlimited minutes for $50 month). Right now DS and I share the phone and it works just fine. In the next year or so he may need his own phone and I will need a different plan but I will deal with that later (he would need a cell anyway since he takes various classes on college campus). I dont have text, internet, etc on the cell, just regular phone and it works great. I dont miss the landline and yes I've called 9-1-1 from it - saw an accident on the freeway and you have to give your location. Ive also called the non emergency # and you have to give your locationa as well.
post #19 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
Sometimes I also misplace my cell in my house and have to use my landline to call it!
this! This is a big reason we have a landline!

My parents' house has terrible cell reception for all carriers, so they use their landline a lot.
post #20 of 48
I haven't had a landline in about 7 years. I haven't missed it at all.

When I lose my cell and need someone to call it to find it, if DH isn't home, I'll sometimes go on Facebook and get someone to call me.
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