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letting go of the landline pro and con? - Page 2

post #21 of 48
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post #22 of 48
we kept the landline for years because I'm always misplacing my cell-phone and need to call it. But, now I use on of the online cell-phone services a few times a week. wheresmycellphone.com or something like that. It doesn't seem like theres any kind of charge, it just plays an add if you do pick it.

I don;t miss it much, until I happen to have a conversation with someone when we are both on a landline - the cell phone just does not sound as clear.
post #23 of 48
I haven't had a land line in probably 7 years? Something like that.

I don't miss it, really. When I lived with two roommates sometimes I wished we had it, because sometimes I wanted to talk to someone who was at home, and I didn't care who, but I didn't need to talk to them if they weren't home.

If I lose my phone I either get online and email someone to call me, or I could go to the T Mobile website and text myself from there.

But I do wonder what it will be like when DD is old enough to get phone calls. But I figure that is probaby 10 years before it's a real issue- and who knows what things will be like by then!
post #24 of 48
We also haven't had a landline and years and don't miss it. My DD has her own cell phone, so it's not like I just have mine available - and actually, we have a prepaid one with a few minutes left, too. DH has a cell, of course, as well. I also know I could use skype to make a phone call if need be - or of course email, IM, etc.

We just don't need a landline. I have the lowest amount of minutes of my iphone plan and don't go anywhere near over it each month.

I've also texted/IM'd myself to find my phone when home alone - so I don't worry about losing it and needing to call it.
post #25 of 48
We have a landline. It's not advertised but it is called "dial-tone" service or something like that. Call the company and ask or poke around their website. For us, the cost is $5/month plus taxes so it works out to about $8/month. I chose the absolute cheapest which means that I pay ten cents per outgoing call (incoming are free). When I called and asked about it, they tried to give me dialtone service plus 60 calls/month which ends up being about $14/month. I specifically asked for the cheapest service and the customer service people are obviously trained to automatically give the customer the "upsell" without really stating that it's an upsell. I'd done my research on the company website so I knew that the base price was $5/month.

I like having a landline, but I'm obviously in the minority here!
post #26 of 48
I also live where there are ice storms, and so am loath to give up the landline. Ours happen once every few years but are getting more frequent with global warming it seems. Even as contemplating life as a single mom. . . . the frequency of these outages here makes me want to keep the landline.

However, here you can register your cell number with 911, and your address will pop up when you call them, the same as a landline. If that service isn't offered in your city, start lobbying to get it.
post #27 of 48
One other thing about landlines-- I mentioned my parents' house, but really, everywhere I've lived the landline sound has just been clearer and better than cell. Is that not the case for you all?
post #28 of 48
1 I prefer talking on the home phone for long conversations
2 I don't want to share my cell phone with my daughter who lives at home and has a boyfriend that lives out of state that she talks to on a daily basis ( we have unlimited long distance at home)
3 can't call home unless someone is here with a cellular line
4 I don't want to give my cell number out to every person and company that needs to contact me
5 in the event of a hurricane a land line is important
post #29 of 48
We have been without a landline for a long time now, and it has never been an issue. My sitters all have cell phones, and DP and I each have one, so there is always a phone at the house if there are any people in it. I plan to get DD a phone once she is old enough to be on her own for significant periods of time anyhow (several years away, she is 2 now...)

I grew up where power went out regularly (snow/ice storms) and the phones were hardly ever working when the power was out. Cell phones usually did work. Also, we have a crank-powered emergency charger in a truly dire emergency.

The only time I've had a landline was when I lived in a house with no cell phone reception.. Then it is handy...

I don't use landlines much, but at my parents' the voice quality is far worse on a landline. Maybe they just have a poor landline. My cellphone voice quality is pretty decent.
post #30 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGirls View Post
I grew up where power went out regularly (snow/ice storms) and the phones were hardly ever working when the power was out. Cell phones usually did work.
This. I'm kind of confused at the pp's statements because I've actually NEVER lost cell phone reception for more than a few minutes, but I remember landlines constantly being out during heavy rains, snow storms, etc. ???
post #31 of 48
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post #32 of 48
OK I sort of get it (and that's horrible that they just don't want to pay for it)... I still feel like every time we lost power we also lost landlines though. Maybe they are backed up better now than ~10 years ago?? And this means you'd also need a corded landline not a cordless, correct?
post #33 of 48
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post #34 of 48
unlike most posters here we dropped our cell phones and kept the landline.

we now pay 13.00 per month for phone service rather than 75.00 for two with basic service and don't miss the cells hardly at all. i have noticed that there aren't many pay phones around anymore but we just try to prepare before leaving and not rely on having a cell.

when we made this decision we lived in a town that was pretty remote and cell phones didn't work unless we went to town. we have now moved and it's just normal for us to only have a phone at home.

i actually like being kind of antiquated in this way. people act all shocked that we don't have cells and it's more shocking to me how many people think they have to have them.
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auroara Bobcat View Post
1) They are not 100% reliable: what if the electricity goes out and your phone isn't charged and then dies. What if there is a storm and the reception goes out on the phone. What if the phone breaks or gets water damaged?

2) Cell phones and cell phone plans are expensive and it seems to me that you would be replacing a cell phone more often than a land line.
This. My power does funny things here, and there are far more cell phone and internet issues than hard land line issues. That's why we don't do the bundle thing. In my town, the internet and cable have a tendency to be less reliable than our land line, so relying on those is... interesting.

Plus then there's the whole remembering to charge it and then leaving it somewhere where you can actually hear it. A friend of mine has just her cell and her hubby's cell, and she's missed many a call of mine that went to voicemail because her phone was on the other end of the house and she couldn't here it or it wasn't charged up.


But I'm not a huge phone talker like some folks are. I have a pre-paid cell for emergencies or whatnot, but really, I rarely use it until/unless I need to use up some of the minutes. If I had the phone glued to my ear my response may be different though.
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisCat View Post
As to the corded phone, absolutely. We have a little corded phone that I keep handy for power outages because a cordless phone will not work. I wonder if that might be why some people think their phone goes out when their power does.
We had a corded landline, so, it was always because service was out, not because of the phone. We also lost phone service frequently (like 10+ times a year) for various reasons. Thunderstorms, snowstorms, and wind storms almost always knocked the phone out (even if the power was on) and sometimes critters got to the lines and we lost phone service... Sometimes it was for an hour, sometimes for a couple of days. My dad's cell phone was a huge help in those situations. I've had a cell for nearly 10 years and have never lost service unless I traveled out of the service zone. So while I'm sure cell phones are not "100% reliable", land lines are certainly not either.
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Youngfrankenstein View Post
That is a great idea. I've wondered what to do if we drop the landline and how that involves the kids. I guess the answer is "house phone".
This is what I do. I have my cell, with all the bells and whistles, and the home phone is the cheapy-come-with-the-plan phone. It stays at home all the time, or if one of the kids is going somewhere and need a phone, they take it with them. I love this arrangement. I have not had a landline in 6-ish years?
post #38 of 48
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post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGirls View Post
We had a corded landline, so, it was always because service was out, not because of the phone. We also lost phone service frequently (like 10+ times a year) for various reasons. Thunderstorms, snowstorms, and wind storms almost always knocked the phone out (even if the power was on) and sometimes critters got to the lines and we lost phone service... Sometimes it was for an hour, sometimes for a couple of days. My dad's cell phone was a huge help in those situations. I've had a cell for nearly 10 years and have never lost service unless I traveled out of the service zone. So while I'm sure cell phones are not "100% reliable", land lines are certainly not either.
I think it depends on whether you're in an older area with hanging wires, or a newer area with buried wires (or an area where they've had an incentive to switch to buried wires). Where I grew up, all the phone cables were on the same poles with the electricity, and when a pole went down, you could lose both. In my experience, electricity has more redundancy than phone, so a pole going down could result in either a full electricity outage or a brief outage as the routing was switched. But if a pole with phone lines on went down, your phone was down until the pole was back up.
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by cschick View Post
I think it depends on whether you're in an older area with hanging wires, or a newer area with buried wires (or an area where they've had an incentive to switch to buried wires). Where I grew up, all the phone cables were on the same poles with the electricity, and when a pole went down, you could lose both. In my experience, electricity has more redundancy than phone, so a pole going down could result in either a full electricity outage or a brief outage as the routing was switched. But if a pole with phone lines on went down, your phone was down until the pole was back up.
why didn't I think of that! I bet that's the missing piece. I know growing up our phone lines were always on poles & always went out with the electricity. That makes sense now!
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