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Any CNM's (or CNM's to be) here? Have some Q's

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I am going to go back to school this winter, and pretty sure I want to be a CNM. I am only about a semester or two away from my Associates (just have to find out what credits transfer). The thing is, I am not too interested in becoming a nurse first, as all the programs I were reading were saying that you get your BSN, then MSN and midwifery. It seemed that in order to then go on to become a CNM after your BSN, that you are required to work as a nurse for a year or so? Am I correct on that? Is there another way?

I love birth, pregnancy, women care, etc... but not really into all the things that go with general nursing, like med/surg or other rotations (besides L&D, of course). I also don't want to be a CPM, so I know I would have to go to nursing school.

Anyone here a CNM, or in the process of becoming one? Is there another way to become a CNM, maybe some bridge program I don't know about?
post #2 of 8
Most advanced practice nursing degrees do require you to have a year of experience - but not all. My university, for example, lists it as a "recommendation" for a couple degrees (FNP, PNP, as well as public health and teaching nursing school). I would guess they give priority to those applicants who have worked as an RN. The nurse-midwifery program there does require one year experience, though (and obviously you do need to be an RN and have a bachelors degree for entry.) If I were you, I'd apply for BSN programs once you have your associates - do you have most of the science courses done? Just know that the programs are very competitive, so you'd need a 3.5+ GPA, most likely.

Frontier has a ADN-MSN bridge program - but again, you have to have an associates degree in nursing, and you do need one year of experience as a nurse, or similar (such as doula work).

I'm sure there are CNM programs that don't require that year of experience - my mom is a CNM (with 30 years in L&D), but she works with a midwife who went straight through the schooling w/o working as an RN... so I assume they are out there somewhere.

Best of luck figuring it out. Hopefully someone else has some ideas for you to look into. Besides your clinical rotations in nursing school (which aren't very long), there's no reason you have to work in med-surg or other areas of nursing that don't appeal to you. You could do your one year in NICU or L&D or mother and baby. The issue is finding a job in this economy, though - many new grads can't get a job even in a nursing home right now. This depends on your location, and of course it's hard to say how it will be like in a few years when you are an RN.
post #3 of 8
I'm a new grad RN with an ADN and I'm applying to Frontier's bridge. I work in critical care and have many years of experience as a doula. I avoided nursing school and the idea of being a nurse for a long time, and I wish I hadn't- being a nurse is wonderful, even though critical care is not where I want to stay. Just the three months of orientation (with at least two more to come) have been great experience in hands-on skills- I can see why programs require some experience. It makes a definite, obvious change in you. I still feel incredibly awkward at work, often, but getting that groove of clinical skills outside of school is definitely worth it. It's hard to explain, but even though you don't have to do that year of med-surg, I think it's better than nothing.

Just FYI, even with adequate birth experience, the person I spoke with at Frontier says they still like to see at least some work as a registered nurse.
post #4 of 8
I see that you're in CT. Yale has a direct-entry CNM program. It requires that you have a Bachelor's degree in a non-nursing field. It has no pre-requisites. When you are accepted you are accepted into a three year CNM program. The first year is a nursing program. You don't get a BSN but after the first year you are eligible to take the NCLEX. The last two years are specialty years where you take nurse-midwifery classes.

Another option is to become a CM. However, CMs are only recognized in certain states- NY, NJ, any more? You would have to take prerequisites and your area of practice would be severely restricted to the few states that allow it. If you are interested in these programs they are listed on the ACNM website.
post #5 of 8
I am currently doing the same thing you are! I am just entering my second year of college, going to finish up my associates and then get my BSN, then MSN as a CNM.

I have found that there is something called a "bridge program" offered at some schools. On www.midwife.org, it calls this option a "Associates Degree (AD) RN to CNM Option." Looking through the sites listed underneath it, it doesn't really look all that different though... It's definitely a long road to become a midwife. But it's going to be worth it!
post #6 of 8
I did Yale's Master's Entry program. It is a great program. You don't have experience as a nurse first, but it helps to get into the program (although the already nurses didn't make better midwives-they were similar to the rest of the group). I do think that L/D nursing experience has made me better in my job, however, because I can do nursing things such as putting in an IV or drawing blood without stressing.
post #7 of 8
I'm hoping to do the bridge program at Frontier. It'll be at least another 3 yrs though as I finish my RN and then work for a year.
post #8 of 8
Shells n Cheese- I'm from CT too and there was a meeting about how to become a midwife. We are meeting again next month if you want to know more PM me.
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