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should I fight the school? *UPDATE* - Page 3

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtyhipegirl View Post
We are Air Force so I let the special needs coordinator at our base know. She wants to take action against them also. The base we are at has many special needs children so I asked her to warn incoming special needs parents. If we would have known we would not have moved in our neighborhood. As much as I hate being wronged and would love to show them they can't do this to people, I have to think about what's best for dd.
I totaly understand! I hope your dd loves the new school

I just hate the fact they can treat people like this-I hope the coordinator kicks some butts in the right direction
post #42 of 48
I'm glad you've found a solution that works, and a school that seems like they'll care for your daughter. I'm also glad that you took it up with your AF resources. Maybe that will bring about some change!

Just a quick note of hope about the school you've been placed in. The school our kids attend is not "the best" on paper. It's low income (85% of the kids are on free or reduced lunch), with a high population of ESL students (65% don't speak English when they arrive). About half of the parents in our middle class neighborhood transfer their kids to other schools to avoid this one. They're missing out on a lot. The teachers are fantastic. They do real differentiation so that kids who are at the same level are working together -- those that need more help are getting more help. They re-arrange the kids every 6-10 weeks so that if you've made progress (or slipped), you get moved accordingly. This school has virtually no bullying. They have the money (from Title I funds) for a full time counselor. She goes into the classrooms once a week and they work on social skills, rules, etc. Other, richer, schools have much more of a problem with bullying and pushy parents.

Let's hope that your new school is like ours!
post #43 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
I'm glad you've found a solution that works, and a school that seems like they'll care for your daughter. I'm also glad that you took it up with your AF resources. Maybe that will bring about some change!

Just a quick note of hope about the school you've been placed in. The school our kids attend is not "the best" on paper. It's low income (85% of the kids are on free or reduced lunch), with a high population of ESL students (65% don't speak English when they arrive). About half of the parents in our middle class neighborhood transfer their kids to other schools to avoid this one. They're missing out on a lot. The teachers are fantastic. They do real differentiation so that kids who are at the same level are working together -- those that need more help are getting more help. They re-arrange the kids every 6-10 weeks so that if you've made progress (or slipped), you get moved accordingly. This school has virtually no bullying. They have the money (from Title I funds) for a full time counselor. She goes into the classrooms once a week and they work on social skills, rules, etc. Other, richer, schools have much more of a problem with bullying and pushy parents.

Let's hope that your new school is like ours!


Thanks for sharing this, it's encouraging. When I went in to talk to the new teacher she showed me some really cool things she has done for a some of the students that don't speak English very well. She seemed like she passionate about her job and the best way to teach dd. Which is exactly what my dd needs. I really think a lot of the talk of "bad" school "good" school has to do with economic and race issues. I'm glad you had a good experience. I hope we do as well.
post #44 of 48
I'm glad things have worked out. However, be aware that district special needs coordinators frequently LIE to get what they want. They will flat out LIE about what you will and won't get until you threaten a lawsuit or get someone else in there to fight with you. Unfortunately, I've seen it happen. Just keep that in the back of your mind for future school years.

From what you've said, you are making the best decision, but it's not right that you had to. they should just do what they're supposed to. I will fight to the ends of the earth for my boys (and my dd, but my boys have more complicated educational issues), but it pisses me off that I HAVE to. The schools should just do the right thing.
post #45 of 48
Are you in VA?

REGULATIONS GOVERNING SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN


There is a parent complaint form link at the bottom of the page.
VDOE :: Special Education Complaints
post #46 of 48
just would like to add that an advocate might be worth pursuing in situations like this.

I know how hard it can be to get a ton of information from other people but when you mention it to the school, they shoot it down, and because you are not an expert in the rules its hard to win the argument.

there are advocates that can come to your meetings, represent you to the school, etc. many are free of charge from non profit organizations like ARC. The school district is super careful when dealing with advocates because the advocates know the law.

Its unfortunate that it sometimes comes to that, but probably good information to have for the future should you have trouble again.

Big hugs, mama!
XOXO
B
post #47 of 48
I don't have any advice, but I wanted to send some support. I am so sorry you and your daughter have to put up with this crap! I hope your daughter thrives at her new school.
post #48 of 48
clicked on this hoping it might have some sort of insight for me...my heart goes out to you and your baby! (yeah I know she's a kindergartener just like my oldest 'baby' )

Not only has she had to deal with the trauma of whatever accident caused her injury, and I'm sure her life has changed because of this injury--she's having to cope with that.......now, when she goes to school, she has this teacher who only sees her disability. I'm going to cry now.......I can only imagine that she already sees herself as "different" than she was before, now she's got this person treating her like she is a freak rather than a 6 year old little girl who's been through ENOUGH already. AND she now has to switch schools and be "the new kid" which is probably less strange at this age than when they're older, but it's still a transition. The only *good* thing about it is it sounds like this new teacher will be much more sensitive to her needs, which will affect how she answers students' questions about your child's differences and will affect how they view and treat her. (ie the difference between treating her like she is a freak and a liability, an attitude that will cause the other kids to most likely avoid her, and treating her like she is a child who happens to need some extra help with things, do things differently, whatever the case might be...just like some kids need help learning to hold a pencil and others don't, your child needs help on the stairs and others don't.)

I'm happy to hear she's getting a much more friendly teacher and learning environment.

There are a couple schools in my city that are labelled "to avoid" that I've heard great things about....hoping this is the case for you and her!
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