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Weight Gain Worries...

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hi Again,

I'm starting this pregnancy quite a bit overweight. I can't exercise like a normal person thanks to a balance disorder which sneaks up on me and leaves me bed ridden for days or weeks...

But now, I'm totally stressing about putting on baby weight! I feel absolutely huge already, and I'm genuinely concerned about what the end result will be for my health and self esteem....

I've heard of people dieting successfully, (carefully, under supervision) during pregnancy, but this does make me a bit nervous since I lost 2 babies just recently. I don't want to "fiddle"...

Any words of wisdom?

Thanks...sorry it's kind of a boring question...

Marcie
post #2 of 23
I was very overweight for my last two pregnancies. I'm still a bit overweight now but have lost a lot.

Anyway, eat healthy. Don't overeat. Just eat enough to feel fine and choose good things.

I'm currently on the candida diet because I have candida overgrowth. And since becoming pregnant I've lost 3 lbs. Sugar is really unhealthy. I would do my best to avoid sugar. Also, it's a good idea to avoid eating a lot of carbs since they turn to sugar in the bloodstream. I realize now that my eating of lots of sugary and processed foods were what got me 60 lbs overweight. I really don't think I was eating a ton, but my food choices were bad. Lots of people who are overweight have candida issues, so I would check into the candida diet if I were you.

If you can do any kind of "exercise" that would be good. For example, going for walks, doing housework, anything that gets you up and moving some.
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

Candida...

Hi there,
Yes, I have an issue with sugar-primarily chocolate, which I love. It's my only vice, but it's a powerful one. I have looked into Candida, for other reasons long ago, but I think it's a good idea to have another look-thanks for the suggestion!
post #4 of 23
I've recently been dieting to lose 10 pounds (which I did) before I became pregnant. I learned a lot. First, you could go to a calorie calculator and enter in your info for your age, weight and height, before pregnancy. That'll tell you how many calories you burn on an average day. Then, from what I've read (and I've looked around a lot), you don't need any extra calories in the first trimester, and only 300 extra per day for the rest of the pregnancy. This *should* keep your weight gain to a reasonable level. I've always gained a lot of weight in my pregnancies so I am endeavoring this time not to overdo it!!! The catch is that in order to eat a lot of food and stay within your calorie "budget", you will more than likely start eating lower calorie, healthier foods. I love caloriecount.com because you can look up any food and see it's calorie count!

Best wishes!
post #5 of 23
You can also count carbs and make sure you eating any extra. I was doing a lowcarb diet before the morning sickness started. I haven't lost any more but haven't gained either. Once I feel good I'm going to try to limit carbs again. I think I read the minimum for pregnancy was 80g? I gained a lot my 1st two pregnancies and I still have almost 10 pounds from those. I need to lose 40 pounds. I'm planning on not gaining as much this time. Already warned DH I'm not making the normal dozen different Christmas cookies this year. I do so love to bake. Sigh. lol.
post #6 of 23
just be careful not to limit carbs too much. When you cut carbs you're actually cutting your energy reserve. You'll start to feel more tired and have difficulty doing even normal daily activities. Also, if you cut down carbs by way too much, you could go into ketoacidosis. This is why the Atkins diet is the worst thing ever created... If that Atkins guy knew even a single thing about the human body he'd know that carbs are essential for the human body and if we don't get enough we'll start breaking down proteins to accomplish what we need to do. Which is horrible for our bodies. Anyway, cutting carbs down (if you eat alot) can be a good thing but if you take it too far could be a very bad thing. I'm more of the school of eat what you are craving because our bodies know better than we do what we need. Just make sure they're healthier carbs. Anyway, don't stress too much about it. This is supposed to be a happy, joyful time in your life and stress will not only make you resent this time period but will also actually cause you to gain more weight. Just make healthy choices and enjoy this time in your life! :-) good luck!!!
post #7 of 23
Actually, ketosis and ketoacidosis are not the same thing. This is often confused. While I do not follow Dr. Atkins diet, I do follow a different low carb way of eating. It takes extreme reduction of carbohydrate grams to enter ketosis for most people. I'm talking 40 or less grams per day.

Carbohydrates can and will make you GAIN weight. It doesn't matter if they are carbs from a donut or a slice of fancy artisan whole grain bread. That said, it doesn't hurt to take it easy on how many you consume if you want to prevent a huge amount of weight gain. Try an open faced sandwich with one slice of bread or use more veggies and meat in your pasta and less noodles.
Limit sugary drinks and sweets. Don't be afraid of healthy fats. If fat made us fat, I would have gained 40 pounds instead of losing it.
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks ladies...

It's interesting to hear all these conflicting views...

I am gluten-free, potato free and oat free, so the only carbs I get are from brown rice, brown rice pasta and sweet potatoes. I am also a pescatarian, eating only fish and no other meat.

I eat a lot of fresh veggies and fruit, which I really love-yes, even the broccoli! I'd go raw if I could afford it, because I went high raw for 30 days a few months ago and felt even in that short amount of time, a real difference!

For me, it's sugar. Chocolate, ice cream and caramels. I kicked sugar once, and did feel a little better, but never lost a single pound...which made me depressed, and well...I gave in and self medicated with some chocolate >

Marcie
post #9 of 23
Yeah, I would definitely reconsider cutting out sugar again. I know it's tough. I used to be a sugar-holic. LOL

I think everyone was pretty much in agreement from what I saw actually. Low carb is fine but not too low. Little to no sugar is ideal. BTW, fruit has fructose which will feed candida. If you have candida, you'll need to limit fruit consumption for quite a while as well. Just take a look into it and you'll find out what I mean.

A word of advice, don't wait to start treating your candida until you have ringworm like I do. I've been trying to treat and get rid of my ringworm for 3 months now, I still have it. I have tried multiple treatments. - Prescription, OTC, essential oils and now I'm trying a thing called "Yeast Rescue." That one helps with the itching a lot and I hope it will kill it finally. I have been using that for 2 weeks though so I don't know. I got it from a health food store.

Another thing. You can't trust your bodies cravings if you have candida. Candida will make you crave sweets and carbs so that it can grow. If you crave broccoli or zucchini then you can trust that but if you crave a big chocolate bar, do NOT trust that. HTH

Here's a candida diet link...
http://www.holistichelp.net/candida-diet.html

Here's a symptom checker link...
http://www.holistichelp.net/candida.html
post #10 of 23
do your balance issues prohibit you from swimming?

I have issues with my joints, but swimming has been a great way to gain some activity without stressing my body.
post #11 of 23
i was actually following the candida diet when i finally concieved. I haven't been able to stick with it lately with all my weird cravings and aversions, but i'm not eating a lot of sugar either.
post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I definately can't swim. I've decided to do my best with walking, which can be difficult on it's own, but at least isn't jumping around or anything.

As for the sugar thing...I know how stupid this is going to sound outloud, but I'm going to say it anyway.

Sugar is my only vice and I don't want to give it up.

I don't drink, smoke, eat meat, watch TV, chew tobacco, eat potato chips, eat regular pasta, I can't eat tomatoes-so no italian, and quite frankly-I feel like giving this up will take away the one thing (aside from sleep!) that I know I can do for myself to make me feel better...

Yes, I realize how pathetic that sounds. But I've had to give soooo much up switching to the mold-free diet, combined with the no nightshade veggies diet, and then most other things I liked like cookies, pastries, donuts and the like with the addition of the gluten free diet. That being said, I feel like I should cut down...

But I start out with just a small something...and I end up nibbling the whole day, and at the end of the day I've burned through an entire candy bar. Or two.
post #13 of 23
Well, although I understand how you feel. That's going to be something that will definitely negatively impacts your health. I hope you can find the strength at some point to give it up.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauren82 View Post
Actually, ketosis and ketoacidosis are not the same thing. This is often confused. While I do not follow Dr. Atkins diet, I do follow a different low carb way of eating. It takes extreme reduction of carbohydrate grams to enter ketosis for most people. I'm talking 40 or less grams per day.

Carbohydrates can and will make you GAIN weight. It doesn't matter if they are carbs from a donut or a slice of fancy artisan whole grain bread. That said, it doesn't hurt to take it easy on how many you consume if you want to prevent a huge amount of weight gain. Try an open faced sandwich with one slice of bread or use more veggies and meat in your pasta and less noodles.
Limit sugary drinks and sweets. Don't be afraid of healthy fats. If fat made us fat, I would have gained 40 pounds instead of losing it.
http://women.webmd.com/guide/high-pr...ohydrate-diets

(here's a good website that discuses the risks associated with low carb diets)

You're right, they're not the same. One leads to the other. Either way it's a nasty thing that happens to your body and it's pretty easy to get there. The body needs 6-11 servings of carbs per day. As long as you're getting that much you're fine. Less than that and you're at risk (a sandwich with 2 pieces of bread includes 4 servings so it's not like you need much). However, it's not accurate that all carbs are the same.complex carbs are FAR healthier for you!! If you eat a simple sugar, your body does not require any effort to break it down and digest it because it's already in it's simplest form. However, if your body has to go through 2 or 3 steps to break it down (polysaccharide to disaccharide to monosaccharide) your body is actually benefitting from ingesting it. Simple sugars to either avoid or only ingest in moderation are things that include fructose, sucrose, glucose, and galactose. Anyway, overall it's not worth the stress and as long as you're eating your sugar in moderation that's much healthier than stress or depression from being so hard on yourself. Your body releases unhealthy amounts of hormones under stress and depression. All of this is coming from my medical background and experience, not just something I cooked up in my head (FYI) good luck and keep us posted on how you're feeling.
post #15 of 23
I had an interesting discussion with my non-traditional MD yesterday. He said that if he were delivering my baby, he would urge me to gain 50-60 pounds during this prenancy (eating healthy) (even though I'm already quite overweight.) He was a friend of Tom Brewer (Brewer's Diet.) With my history of 3 c-sections and usually gaining 30 pounds during pregnancy, that he believes I didn't have enough energy during labor to get the job done. Just some food for thought! (Long story, but he's not my OB this time because of political issues with VBACs in IL. I doubt I'll be able to find a doctor who will take me at all for a VBAC. )
post #16 of 23


Keotsis does not "lead" to ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a natural state of the body not a pathological state. Huge difference.

 

I think you might really enjoy reading Good Calories Bad Calories by Gary Taubes. http://www.amazon.com/Good-Calories-Bad-Gary-Taubes/dp/1400040787 It was written for medical professionals. Mr. Taubes has a new book directed at the general public coming out at the end of this month. If you're really busy with your studies and can't dedicate the time it takes to plow through Good Calories, Bad Calories, I hear this book is an excellent summary of the dense material provided in GCBC.

 

Since you are a nursing student, you might really enjoy learning about the hormone regulation involved in food metabolism. This book goes quite a bit deeper than the Nutrition course required for nursing school. It's fascinating, as well as the history of how medicine arrived at the conclusions concerning carbohydrates and fats and how this plays into our current state of ill-health.

 

I think it is very important for health professionals to be apprised of the latest research available and all signs these days are pointing to the SAD as the diet that is killing us. Low carb is *not* bad for you. Elimination of grains and sugars and lots of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats (and that includes saturated fats! it does *not* include margarine!), and proteins appears to keep the regulation of hormones in check, reduces inflammation (which I'm sure you're aware is the main culprit behind heart attack, stroke and countless autoimmune dysregulations among other things), and keeps people from feeling run down. It changed my life and I totally wasn't expecting it. I tried it bc my husband read GCBC (he's a PharmD student with a genetics degree. Lots of biochem in his background as well) and then I read it (I've been an RN for seven years) and thought that the evidence seemed overwhelming. I just didn't expect how much it improved my general health: triglycerides down, lipids down, fasting glucose normal, boundless energy, GERD is gone.

 

It might change your mind.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricaRN View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauren82 View Post
Actually, ketosis and ketoacidosis are not the same thing. This is often confused. While I do not follow Dr. Atkins diet, I do follow a different low carb way of eating. It takes extreme reduction of carbohydrate grams to enter ketosis for most people. I'm talking 40 or less grams per day.

Carbohydrates can and will make you GAIN weight. It doesn't matter if they are carbs from a donut or a slice of fancy artisan whole grain bread. That said, it doesn't hurt to take it easy on how many you consume if you want to prevent a huge amount of weight gain. Try an open faced sandwich with one slice of bread or use more veggies and meat in your pasta and less noodles.
Limit sugary drinks and sweets. Don't be afraid of healthy fats. If fat made us fat, I would have gained 40 pounds instead of losing it.
http://women.webmd.com/guide/high-pr...ohydrate-diets

(here's a good website that discuses the risks associated with low carb diets)

You're right, they're not the same. One leads to the other. Either way it's a nasty thing that happens to your body and it's pretty easy to get there. The body needs 6-11 servings of carbs per day. As long as you're getting that much you're fine. Less than that and you're at risk (a sandwich with 2 pieces of bread includes 4 servings so it's not like you need much). However, it's not accurate that all carbs are the same.complex carbs are FAR healthier for you!! If you eat a simple sugar, your body does not require any effort to break it down and digest it because it's already in it's simplest form. However, if your body has to go through 2 or 3 steps to break it down (polysaccharide to disaccharide to monosaccharide) your body is actually benefitting from ingesting it. Simple sugars to either avoid or only ingest in moderation are things that include fructose, sucrose, glucose, and galactose. Anyway, overall it's not worth the stress and as long as you're eating your sugar in moderation that's much healthier than stress or depression from being so hard on yourself. Your body releases unhealthy amounts of hormones under stress and depression. All of this is coming from my medical background and experience, not just something I cooked up in my head (FYI) good luck and keep us posted on how you're feeling.
post #17 of 23

Honestly, trying to diet or limit weight gain during pregnancy, even for those of use who started out over weight, is not a good idea. Even women who are obese or morbidly obese muse gain some weight during pregnancy. While the current medical wisdom is to have overweight moms limit weight gain to 15lbs or so, there are voices that dissent from that, and say that it could lead to worse outcomes for the baby, including prematurity and underweight. If I were in your situation I would try to eat healthfully, avoid sugar, and listen to my body. Make sure you are staying hydrated (with water!) because severe dehydration will sometimes mask itself as hunger if you habitually ignore thirst signals. 

 

On the subject of sugar as vice - I know how that feels. You love it, you want it, you need it, it calms you down and evens you out when you are stressed or angry or sad. It's your one indulgence, it's your special thing. I felt the exact, same way about cigarettes as my mom and you do about sugar. We have the same reasons for addiction, but one is socially acceptable and one isn't. It doesn't mean either behavior better than the other, imho. I would consult my doctor and consider getting some help kicking the sugar habit. Excess sugar can have many negative effects on your body, your pregnancy, and your baby (both in the womb and out of it). The first step in going off sugar is accepting that you are addicted to it, and getting help accordingly, from a mental health professional if possible. Someone who can help you with your issues of body perception, self esteem, and addiction. Start getting help now, and you will be doing yourself and your baby a great deal of good.

post #18 of 23

I had my appt yesterday and the NP was concerned that I gained 6lbs in a month.  I think I'm up about 10-12lbs.  She said to reduce my salt intake and drink lots of water.    I gained 35lbs with my son and there was no mention of gaining too much weight back then. 

 

Does anyone have suggestions on what to bring to lunch for work?  I'm really hungry at lunch so I've been bringing fruit and peanut butter sandwiches to tide me over till lunchtime, but my stomach's still growling at me.  I only have a microwave at work.  I do have a weakness for going out to lunch, but I'm thinking I need to cut back some.

post #19 of 23

I would just concentrate on eating as healthily as you can, and not worry about the numbers. It's so important to feed your growing baby, and I really don't like to see people restrict themselves too much when they're pregnant. I mean, yes, skip extra sugar and empty calories, but if you're hungry, eat, just make good choices. Make sure you drink enough water, and just let nature do it's thing. Your body will do what it needs to do. Unless you've gained 50 lbs from the beginning of your pregnancy to now, I wouldn't take any drastic options. A healthy baby at the end is the most important thing.

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippy918 View Post

I had my appt yesterday and the NP was concerned that I gained 6lbs in a month.  I think I'm up about 10-12lbs.  She said to reduce my salt intake and drink lots of water.    I gained 35lbs with my son and there was no mention of gaining too much weight back then. 

 

Does anyone have suggestions on what to bring to lunch for work?  I'm really hungry at lunch so I've been bringing fruit and peanut butter sandwiches to tide me over till lunchtime, but my stomach's still growling at me.  I only have a microwave at work.  I do have a weakness for going out to lunch, but I'm thinking I need to cut back some.


6 lbs in a month doesn't seem too much to cause concern, i know i had the same thing happen with ds, i gained something like 8 lbs in one month, probably month 8 or something and i got lectured, but you know what, if it is just a 1 month thing, maybe your body needed to gain that much, maybe it is just mostly water weight etc. Overall i did gain way more than what is 'needed', like 47 lbs, but then there are others that gain 60-80 and a lot of it is swelling so i just don't really get the whole weight guidelines. I think what you bring into the pregnancy may affect your overall weight gain, but i can say that i am not overeating much here and i am gaining just the same. I don't feel like i am eating more than pre-pregnancy, so I am just listening to my bodies hunger cues and going with that. Now that i am out of the weird food aversion stage i am eating more healthy again, but there is always room for improvement, just try to eat as best you can and don't starve yourself.

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