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Canada: pros and cons? - Page 3

post #41 of 80
I am in Ontario, near Toronto. We get health benefits through work if you work full-time and all prescriptions are fully covered with most companies (ie 100% if you work for a hospital, smaller businesses have only 80% coverage). My 5 year old DS has been undergoing cancer treatment for the past 2 years and it hasn't cost us a cent. His MRIs every 3 months, oncologist visits, eye check ups, chemo, prescriptions....everything is fully covered. We even get reimbursed for our travel expenses through the Canadian Cancer Society which covers our gas and parking fees plus a little extra. I shudder to think how we would have managed the past few years if we lived in the USA.
Our winters are much like North middle eastern USA ie New York City. Snow is from November to March for most years, tempuratures tend to be not as cold as the Prairies (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta). We don't get as much snow as the Eastern Canadian Provinces. Lots of small towns near the border. From Burlington where I live (not a small town) I can be in Buffalo, NY in about 40 minutes. My sister lives on Vancouver Island in a small town and they don't really get any snow there and they also don't get the rain that mainland BC gets. Winters are fairly mild there as well.
post #42 of 80
Words that come to mind about the provinces: (this is rather tongue in cheek)

BC - hippies, retirees, loggers, grizzly bears, totem poles.

Alberta: Cows, oil, neo-cons, the Stampede.

Saskatchewan and Manitoba (sorry to lump you together, I have never been to the prairies): prairies, grain, cold cold cold, social credit party.

Ontario: Upper Canadians, urban sprawl, factories, Parliament, Toronto, rural concessions.

Quebec: Quebecois, supercool-urbanites, liquidized pork spread, poutine, bonhomme.

New Brunswick: snowmobiles

PEI - the beach, Anne, potatoes, farms, cottages, vet college

NS: Where I'm from, so I haven't any really intact stereotypes.

Newfoundland: Moose, fun, fish, home-distilleries, out-ports, seal-flipper pie, Memorial University, boats, cable knit sweaters.

The North (in both territories and provinces): snow machines, aboriginals, gold-panning, polar bears, shooting snow geese, teeny little airplanes, ice-fishing.

Hope this is helpful
post #43 of 80
Bluegoat, I love Dartmouth . It's really pretty. On our recent visit, we checked out Dartmouth Crossing and it seems like it's going to be a really nice place.
post #44 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post

NS: Where I'm from, so I haven't any really intact stereotypes.
Bluenosers
Blueberries
Apples
Forestry
LOBSTER!

Is it odd that all of my associations are mostly food related?
post #45 of 80
I think any stereotypes of BC really should include BC Bud (marijuana).

Tjej
post #46 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjej View Post
I think any stereotypes of BC really should include BC Bud (marijuana).

Tjej
I figured that it was implied with hippies!
post #47 of 80
I personally love the Quebec Province, but I am American and French (France), so it's a great mixture of my roots and I feel really at home here.
If you don't speak French, it's hard to find employment as bilingualism is a huge requirement for any job, even if you don't have contact with people.

If you even did want to move to Quebec, the Gatineau/Hull area (just across the river from Ottawa) is very nice.

Bluegoat,

I've been living in Montreal for the past two years (born and grew up in the US, lived for 16 years in Europe, came to Canada in 2008).

What in the world is liquidized pork spread? (Sounds utterly disgusting...but so does poutine) - which, for the record, I have not yet eaten.

I tend to have a Scots-Irish stereotype of Nova Scotians - you know, cable knit sweaters, bagpipes, Gaelic speaking peoples, breathtaking scenery, a huge maritime tradition (I think of a guy with a Captain's hat, cable knit sweater, corn cob pipe in his mouth, white/grey beard, and wellies).
post #48 of 80
Oh try poutine, you must! It is so disgustingly awesome! I like mine with ketchup and it it is best with cheese curds, not shredded cheese. Beaver Tails and Cow's Ice Cream are also necessities.
post #49 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkinhead View Post
Wolfville NS is gorgeous . Lived there for 10 years.
I second (third?) this. I went to university there (Go Axemen!) and loved it. I keep trying to convince DH that we should move back.

After graduation I lived in Halifax for a year, and I will say that I didn't love it as much. I was made to feel like an outsider at every opportunity. My boss would always point out to potential clients that the entire department was Maritimers - except for me. Or introduce me as "This is justlily, she is from Ontario."

I also found the city core to be dirty, traffic was awful, and when I was living there, there was a problem with swarmings so I didn't even feel comfortable walking home from work (I had an apartment on Spring Garden Road). So although I would move back to NS in a heartbeat, I wouldn't live in Halifax again. A fun place to visit, but I didn't enjoy living there.
post #50 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapioca View Post
http://www.canada.com/news/Canadians...281/story.html

Gigismom:

However, the poll reveals there are also significant regional differences in the way Muslims are viewed in Canada. While 72% of Quebecers said Muslims didn’t share their values, compared to 19% who said they do, that rate dropped to 35.5% in British Columbia where 40.8% saw shared values with Muslims.

Ontario and Alberta were closer to the national average. In Ontario, 54.5% said Muslims don’t share their values, compared to 34.9% who said they do, while in Alberta 57.9% of Albertans said values weren’t shared, compared to 32.4% who said they were.
Well, a couple years ago some politician started stirring things up trying to get people angry about Muslims. Some people in Quebec are very into keeping Quebec french and "pure". Again: It's not the majority, just a small group. Many were upset about this going on and protested. And we're not big protesters. Canada is very much live and let live.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post
Words that come to mind about the provinces: (this is rather tongue in cheek)

BC - hippies, retirees, loggers, grizzly bears, totem poles.

Alberta: Cows, oil, neo-cons, the Stampede.

Saskatchewan and Manitoba (sorry to lump you together, I have never been to the prairies): prairies, grain, cold cold cold, social credit party.

Ontario: Upper Canadians, urban sprawl, factories, Parliament, Toronto, rural concessions.

Quebec: Quebecois, supercool-urbanites, liquidized pork spread, poutine, bonhomme.

New Brunswick: snowmobiles

PEI - the beach, Anne, potatoes, farms, cottages, vet college

NS: Where I'm from, so I haven't any really intact stereotypes.

Newfoundland: Moose, fun, fish, home-distilleries, out-ports, seal-flipper pie, Memorial University, boats, cable knit sweaters.

The North (in both territories and provinces): snow machines, aboriginals, gold-panning, polar bears, shooting snow geese, teeny little airplanes, ice-fishing.

Hope this is helpful
Ok, one question: liquidized pork spread? You mean creton? Head cheese? That stuff has never passed these lips and never will!!! Poutine on the other hand is delicious.

Other than that, I agree with what's mentioned above, I would only add that financially speaking, BC and ON are more expensive and ON seems to have this overwhelming debt thing I keep hearing about. On the other hand, the east coast is seen (stereotypically speaking ) as a place with fewer jobs and lower income. But being a nurse, I think you're golden.

So, my info: I live in a part of southern Quebec that is thought of as an english area. Meaning actual english people live here but it's nowhere near 50/50 IMO. My sister wanted to become a nurse and had to move to Montreal for schooling. She now works in the OR at Mtl General (an "english" hospital). They are so short on nurses and are always recruiting. She would love to move back to the area but would have to be speaking french fluently and she's not at that point yet. Our hospitals are french and speaking english is just a bonus but not required.

My advice to you is to NOT MOVE TO QUEBEC if you don't speak french very well. Why make life more difficult for yourself? I would look at the Maritime provinces. I always thought it sounded nice.

ETA: Unless you want to live in Montreal, then I think you could get along as an English nurse.
post #51 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollycrand View Post

I tend to have a Scots-Irish stereotype of Nova Scotians - you know, cable knit sweaters, bagpipes, Gaelic speaking peoples, breathtaking scenery, a huge maritime tradition (I think of a guy with a Captain's hat, cable knit sweater, corn cob pipe in his mouth, white/grey beard, and wellies).
Cape Breton, Nova Scotia maybe? We've met a ton of British people here (dh is from England) but no Scots.
post #52 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by limette View Post
Cape Breton, Nova Scotia maybe? We've met a ton of British people here (dh is from England) but no Scots.
There are a lot of Scottish/Irish people in Cape Breton as well, but there are still a great many 3rd, 4th, 5th etc generation Scots on mainland NS. Nova Scotia actually means New Scotland in...Latin I think? Nova Scotia has its own tartan: http://www.gov.ns.ca/playground/Tartan.asp and there are still lots of Highland Games in the summer time all over NS .

Also, NS still has quite a large Acadian population.

Personally, my dh is Acadien and I'm 4th generation Scots on my mom's side and 4th generation Irish on my dad's .
post #53 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeatherAtHome View Post
Ok, one question: liquidized pork spread? You mean creton? Head cheese? That stuff has never passed these lips and never will!!! Poutine on the other hand is delicious.
Yes, that is the stuff! I couldn't remember what it is called. My dh loves it; me, not so much.

Quote:
My advice to you is to NOT MOVE TO QUEBEC if you don't speak french very well. Why make life more difficult for yourself? I would look at the Maritime provinces. I always thought it sounded nice.

ETA: Unless you want to live in Montreal, then I think you could get along as an English nurse.
My sister is in Ottawa, and has found that it is very difficult to get a job there without French as well.
post #54 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkinhead View Post
There are a lot of Scottish/Irish people in Cape Breton as well, but there are still a great many 3rd, 4th, 5th etc generation Scots on mainland NS. Nova Scotia actually means New Scotland in...Latin I think? Nova Scotia has its own tartan: http://www.gov.ns.ca/playground/Tartan.asp and there are still lots of Highland Games in the summer time all over NS .

Also, NS still has quite a large Acadian population.

Personally, my dh is Acadien and I'm 4th generation Scots on my mom's side and 4th generation Irish on my dad's .
Cape Breton has a lots of Scots, and also Acadians. Nice small communities, typically high unemployment since the cod fishery, coal mines, and steel mills are kaput.

Mainland NS has a lot of Scots too, as well as Irish, English, Acadians, Germans (especially on the South Shore) and Black Loyalists.

I'm a mutt of sorts - Irish, Scottish, English, German, Dutch, and French (Huguenots, not Acadians.)
post #55 of 80
Where would the best place be to open a small authentic Mexican restaurant? I'm a IBCLC and would try to get a job and then get my family into Canada. My husband is Mexican and would be the one to run the restaurant. I love the way Bridgestone NS looks...i'm thinking that I would need a more mild winter...snow is ok...but not tons of it.
Any suggestions?
post #56 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamato3wild ponnie View Post
Where would the best place be to open a small authentic Mexican restaurant? I'm a IBCLC and would try to get a job and then get my family into Canada. My husband is Mexican and would be the one to run the restaurant. I love the way Bridgestone NS looks...i'm thinking that I would need a more mild winter...snow is ok...but not tons of it.
Any suggestions?
Do you mean Bridgetown? It's quite small. Restaurants sometimes do well in those small places, but I think it can be a tough go. I know some of the places in Annapolis Royal, fairly close to Bridgetown, had closed when I last visited, but that was a few years ago. There isn't much of a Mexican population here; Halifax has two places which are more Tex-Mex and not great quality, and one good place which I believe is quite authentic.

Some of the places with a university or a lot of tourists might be a better bet. Wolfville has a number of good restaurants that seem to do well, and there is a university in Antigonish as well. Another place I visited recently which is a good sized small town in NS is Barrington.

I can imagine a good Mexican place doing really well in one of the other Atlantic capitals: Charlottown, PEI; St Johns, Nfld; or St John NB.
post #57 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamato3wild ponnie View Post
Where would the best place be to open a small authentic Mexican restaurant? I'm a IBCLC and would try to get a job and then get my family into Canada. My husband is Mexican and would be the one to run the restaurant. I love the way Bridgestone NS looks...i'm thinking that I would need a more mild winter...snow is ok...but not tons of it.
Any suggestions?
It could probably work, especially if your goal is to have a safe place for your family to live and grow, and you're okay with never getting rich off of it. One thing you would face though is that many Nova Scotians' idea of Mexican food is Taco Bell, so unless you set up in Halifax, you would need to offer a lot of less authentic items, and even some burgers and fries and similar things if you want to get enough customers. It would be awesome to have authentic Mexican food on the menu too, and there would definitely be some demand for it, but you would need the bland stuff too to pay the bills.
post #58 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelsmama View Post
It could probably work, especially if your goal is to have a safe place for your family to live and grow, and you're okay with never getting rich off of it. One thing you would face though is that many Nova Scotians' idea of Mexican food is Taco Bell, so unless you set up in Halifax, you would need to offer a lot of less authentic items, and even some burgers and fries and similar things if you want to get enough customers. It would be awesome to have authentic Mexican food on the menu too, and there would definitely be some demand for it, but you would need the bland stuff too to pay the bills.
Yeah, A lot of rural Nova Scotians really mind very spicy food - it doesn't tend to be part of our native cuisine. Hodge-podge, chowder, and boiled dinner are more their speed, so many ethnic restaurants have to tone down the heat.
post #59 of 80
Halifax/Dartmouth is a little more cosmopolitan than the smaller communities in Nova Scotia. There are a few Mexican chains in NS (Mexicali Rosa's and more recently a couple of Taco Bells). In Halifx proper, it would probably do very well, especially during tourist season. In the smallre communities like Sheet Harbour, Sherbrooke, greenwood e etc, maybe, but the university towns like Antigonish and Wolfville, you'd probably have some good business
post #60 of 80
Im An American in Canada.

We came to the mountains in BC 6 years ago!!!

We call BC "BRING CASH"

Thus the retirees and green bud.

There are recruitment agencies for needed skilled workers.
If the province needs you, they make it verry easy

In BC the recruitment agency for health care workers is called HealthmatchBC.
They paved the way for us.

It took about 30 thousand dollars to fast track everything. Bought a house, working etc. in BC, in less than 6 months total, from our first inquiry.

everything was extradited, rushed, overnight fed ex every piece of paper. flying here and there forcing individuals in institutions and government agencies to do their JOBS!!! Thats what costed so much.

we feel grateful, happy and lucky to be raising our dd here. it is magical and lovely.

We are war resistors. Canada seems to be following the neo-con plan.

HArper likes prisons, etc.

The DEA busts our local grow-ops.

YEs, The US DEA. So what does the border mean exactly, since NAFTA?

Id like someone to clarify that aspect.

the majority of Canadians live within 50 miles of the US border.
things are cheaper in the us.

Canadian identity is partly about being "NOT AMERICAN" so it is a funny little reactionary thing.
Like big sister little sister energy.

I live in a pocket where many draft dodgers landed, so our village council is mostly NEw Yorkers !!! LOL

Lots to enjoy

better health care

more art and music

clean food and water

bring cash

It will cost Ya!!
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