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DS not vaccinated - how do I realistically protect him?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'm not trying to be an overbearing mother but my DS isn't vaccinated for anything and I worry about him putting other kids toys in his mouth or touching things at the library and then putting his fingers in his mouth. What's a realistic idea of protecting him and what's to much? Thanks!
post #2 of 10
First, it would be helpful to think about which diseases scare you. What are you afraid he'll get from the other kids at the library? Figure out what you're most afraid of, and then research it until you're comfortable. What is the disease? What are the symptoms? When and for how long is it contagious? What are potential complications, and how common are they? How is it treated? What is the long-term prognosis after treatment?

Knowledge really is power, so empower yourself. It makes all the difference in your attitude toward the vaccine-available diseases.

Another thing that really helps is to change the way you think about health and diseases in general. Instead of focusing on your son not picking up a specific bug from other kids, try to focus on boosting his overall health and immunity in general. That means lots of good, whole foods, exercise, and plenty of sleep. It means not over-sanitizing your home environment (i.e. bleaching everything, using alcohol sanitizer every time he touches a doorknob in public, etc.) because daily exposure to germs helps boost immunity. It means learning a little bit about vitamin supplements like Vitamin D3 and sodium ascorbate (check the archives here on MDC--they're packed with useful info).

My son is completely vaccine-free and among the healthiest children I've ever known. I credit this to a strong immune system that has been allowed to do its job naturally, without pharmaceutical tampering (over the counter or otherwise) or vaccine interference, and to his excellent diet and my insistence that he be allowed to sleep even if it's inconvenient for me. We practice good hygiene but I don't wash his hands constantly, and we clean with vinegar and baking soda instead of bleach and other harsh chemicals. If he licks the handle of the shopping cart at the grocery store, or eats an old Cheerio that he found under the couch, it's gross but I try to shrug it off as just another dose of some good old immunity-boosting germs.

I don't worry that he'll catch chicken pox, or mumps, or measles, or polio, any more than I worry that he'll catch the common cold, or scarletina (formerly called scarlet fever), or foot and mouth disease, or any of the diseases that don't have vaccines available per the CDC's schedule. I know that occasional illness is a part of life, and I trust that I'll know when it's time to seek professional help if I can no longer treat him at home.

This peace of mind took years to acquire, and I couldn't have done it without reading and researching. There's a lot I don't know, but I know enough to know that my son is better off without unnecessary powerful pharmaceutical drugs (vaccines) coursing through his little body.

Some books you might find helpful:

Naturally Healthy Babies and Children by Aviva Jill Romm

How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor by Robert Mendelsohn, M.D.

Take Charge of Your Child's Health: A Parents' Guide to Recognizing Symptoms and Treating Minor Illnesses at Home by George Wootan, M.D.

Good luck in your search for more answers, mama. It's a long, hard journey but your child is incredibly fortunate to have a mother who is taking the time to ask the hard questions.
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by peainthepod View Post
First, it would be helpful to think about which diseases scare you. What are you afraid he'll get from the other kids at the library? Figure out what you're most afraid of, and then research it until you're comfortable. What is the disease? What are the symptoms? When and for how long is it contagious? What are potential complications, and how common are they? How is it treated? What is the long-term prognosis after treatment?

Knowledge really is power, so empower yourself. It makes all the difference in your attitude toward the vaccine-available diseases.

Another thing that really helps is to change the way you think about health and diseases in general. Instead of focusing on your son not picking up a specific bug from other kids, try to focus on boosting his overall health and immunity in general. That means lots of good, whole foods, exercise, and plenty of sleep. It means not over-sanitizing your home environment (i.e. bleaching everything, using alcohol sanitizer every time he touches a doorknob in public, etc.) because daily exposure to germs helps boost immunity. It means learning a little bit about vitamin supplements like Vitamin D3 and sodium ascorbate (check the archives here on MDC--they're packed with useful info).

My son is completely vaccine-free and among the healthiest children I've ever known. I credit this to a strong immune system that has been allowed to do its job naturally, without pharmaceutical tampering (over the counter or otherwise) or vaccine interference, and to his excellent diet and my insistence that he be allowed to sleep even if it's inconvenient for me. We practice good hygiene but I don't wash his hands constantly, and we clean with vinegar and baking soda instead of bleach and other harsh chemicals. If he licks the handle of the shopping cart at the grocery store, or eats an old Cheerio that he found under the couch, it's gross but I try to shrug it off as just another dose of some good old immunity-boosting germs.

I don't worry that he'll catch chicken pox, or mumps, or measles, or polio, any more than I worry that he'll catch the common cold, or scarletina (formerly called scarlet fever), or foot and mouth disease, or any of the diseases that don't have vaccines available per the CDC's schedule. I know that occasional illness is a part of life, and I trust that I'll know when it's time to seek professional help if I can no longer treat him at home.

This peace of mind took years to acquire, and I couldn't have done it without reading and researching. There's a lot I don't know, but I know enough to know that my son is better off without unnecessary powerful pharmaceutical drugs (vaccines) coursing through his little body.

Some books you might find helpful:

Naturally Healthy Babies and Children by Aviva Jill Romm

How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor by Robert Mendelsohn, M.D.

Take Charge of Your Child's Health: A Parents' Guide to Recognizing Symptoms and Treating Minor Illnesses at Home by George Wootan, M.D.

Good luck in your search for more answers, mama. It's a long, hard journey but your child is incredibly fortunate to have a mother who is taking the time to ask the hard questions.


that exactly

As counter intuitive as it may seem, you do want him to be exposed to germs little by little to build that immune system. And I could not agree more about the necessity of adequate sleep and excellent nutrition in protecting our children via building healthy immunity.

blessings
post #4 of 10
Just wanted to say that I agree with other two posters and those book recommendations really are great--very informative with practical approaches to handling illness when it does occur.
post #5 of 10
Very well put Peainthepod. I couldn't agree more. You sumed up my exact thoughts on the subject very nicely. I had to LOL about licking the shopping. My DS didn't lick it but I think he picked up CP on one of our shopping trips when he was two probably from a shopping cart. He delt with it really well as he was still nursing and I had CP as a child as well.
post #6 of 10
Agreed. Research the diseases you're concerned about.

My kids are unvaxed and I don't do anything special.

-Angela
post #7 of 10
Nothing more to add here except that I do nothing for my kids (well, besides nutrition, proper sleep, no harsh chemicals, etc).
post #8 of 10
The only thing I would add... That which you resist persists.

From "The Game of Life and How to Play It" by Florence Scovel Shinn:

"The old idea was if a woman did not worry about her children, she was not a good mother. Now, we know that mother-fear is responsible for many of the diseases and accidents which come into the lives of children. For fear pictures vividly the disease or situation feared, and these pictures objectify, if not neutralized."

If you worry about something consistently, it is where your thoughts are focused and what you are likely to create. When we know we are doing everything we can and should, there is nothing to worry about!
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by KistheMum View Post
The only thing I would add... That which you resist persists.

From "The Game of Life and How to Play It" by Florence Scovel Shinn:

"The old idea was if a woman did not worry about her children, she was not a good mother. Now, we know that mother-fear is responsible for many of the diseases and accidents which come into the lives of children. For fear pictures vividly the disease or situation feared, and these pictures objectify, if not neutralized."

If you worry about something consistently, it is where your thoughts are focused and what you are likely to create. When we know we are doing everything we can and should, there is nothing to worry about!
I love that!!

It works for all many parts of parenting... health, development, sleep etc... stop worrying, stop trying to control and stop expecting things and it all falls into place peacfully...
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jewels06 View Post
I'm not trying to be an overbearing mother but my DS isn't vaccinated for anything and I worry about him putting other kids toys in his mouth or touching things at the library and then putting his fingers in his mouth. What's a realistic idea of protecting him and what's to much? Thanks!
The answers have pretty much covered it. I would add that it helped me to look at vaccination as one form of preventative medicine. Vaccines are not your only option when it comes to preventing serious diseases (meningitis or tetanus) or complications from other diseases.
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