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need play-doh recipe with specific requirements!

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I need a recipe for play-doh that meets the following criteria:
1) Will NOT--I repeat, will NOT--stain clothing (oil stains or dye stains)
2) Will last a long time without getting moldy and gross
3) Tastes disgusting so my darling son will not eat it

Anyone have something tried and true? I found a lot of recipes online but I would love a personal recommendation.
post #2 of 25
I found a recipe for microwave playdough. It got moldy fairly fast, so I'd say stay away from microwave recipes. We left it uncolored then kneeded coloring into small balls so we could have multicolored. Once it was colored I don't recall it leaving stains. It had lots of salt and tasted awful.

Not sure any of that helps you, just what I had to offer.
post #3 of 25
Any salt dough recipe is going to taste horrible. We've always done kool-aid, and haven't had a problem with stains after the initial mix-in (which tends to stain the hands). It tastes gross even with the kool-aid, but smells good, so he might be tempted to try a bite if it's an allergy you're concerned about. I haven't found that it gets moldy, but the colors get dull and kind of yucky over time, which I don't find to personally be a huge issue as they always get all mixed together anyways. I think recipes containing cream of tartar tend to last longer, though it significantly increases the cost of the original recipe.
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks! He has no allergies, I just don't want him putting it in his mouth like the regular Play-Doh brand. I think it will tend to get gross over time with bacteria from the mouth. If he tries it and hates it and that is a deterrent for the future, that would be fine.

Ok--I'll look for something with cream of tarter. If it lasts a long time, doesn't stain and my little guy doesn't eat it, I don't mind spending a little more $$.
post #5 of 25
My microwave recipe had lots of cream of tartar and still went moldy in a couple weeks.
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post
My microwave recipe had lots of cream of tartar and still went moldy in a couple weeks.
Huh. Ours (typical salt/wheat dough recipe, done on the stove, not stored in any special way) stayed good (if not brightly colored) for months. It got thrown out before I saw any signs of mold.

Climate may have something to do with it. We weren't in a super-dry climate, but certainly not humid.
post #7 of 25
You might try the "alum playdough" recipe on this page, without the food coloring:

http://babyparenting.about.com/cs/ac.../playdough.htm
post #8 of 25
I've never had this recipe turn moldy. I don't remember it ever getting mold, not even when mom made it for us as children. I now make it for the grandchildren. It will get slimy if stored where it could get hot like on top of the fridge. I store it in a plastic, microwavable storage container on the craft shelf in the kitchen. It's nontoxic but children still shouldn't eat it. It's way too salty. I buy cheap cooking oil and non-iodine salt for this recipe since it's not food.

2 1/2 cups flour
1 cup salt (probably why it doesn't get moldy)
1 TBS alum or cream of tartar (I use cream of tartar)
2 cups boiling water
1 TBS vegetable oil
food coloring

Mix flour, salt, cream of tartar in bowl. Add oil and food coloring to boiling water. Pour over flour mixture and mix well.

Knead on wax paper until smooth (it will be hot). Keep in air tight container.
post #9 of 25
I use the same recipe as sewchris with excellent results!
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by laundrycrisis View Post
You might try the "alum playdough" recipe on this page, without the food coloring:

http://babyparenting.about.com/cs/ac.../playdough.htm
I used the koolaid recipe from that site, and skipped both the oil and alum, and added some corn starch (just to try it.) Turned out fine, and after a week shows no signs of mold, but we do keep it in the fridge.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks...but what about staining? Those that posted recipes, have your children gotten it all over their clothes and then it definitely washed out without problems?
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristin0713 View Post
Thanks...but what about staining? Those that posted recipes, have your children gotten it all over their clothes and then it definitely washed out without problems?
My hands get stained from the kneading but since it's food coloring, it washes out. And when it cools, it no longer stains. Only if you get a drop from the bottle on you will it stain and that will wash out in the next laundry load. When I was a child, I used it in "science experiments". I remember getting blue food coloring on a white blouse. It came right out the next time my mom did laundry.

On a side note, food coloring and rubbing alcohol makes a great dye for macaroni and pasta for art crafts.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristin0713 View Post
Thanks...but what about staining? Those that posted recipes, have your children gotten it all over their clothes and then it definitely washed out without problems?
I haven't had any problems with staining with the kool-aid recipe after initially kneading in the colors, which does tend to stain up the hands (and presumably clothing), but there's no reason the kids have to help with that step if it's an issue. However, my kids aren't generally rubbing the dough into their clothing, and kool-aid is sometimes used as a permanent dye for hair, wool, and so on, so it might be a good idea to test it first.
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
It's the oil in the recipes that makes me nervous, more than the dyes. Yes, I am a little obsessed with keeping stains out of clothing and I just don't want to have to worry about that when I take it out for them to play with.
post #15 of 25
The oil can be replaced with lotion if you want instead. But I've found that it doesn't stain with either.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristin0713 View Post
It's the oil in the recipes that makes me nervous, more than the dyes. Yes, I am a little obsessed with keeping stains out of clothing and I just don't want to have to worry about that when I take it out for them to play with.
WHy no have play clothes/smocks/big T-shirt for the kids so it doesn't matter?
post #17 of 25
I've used the same recipe as sewchris and haven't had any issues with staining. I usually dye it with those 4-to a pack food colors you find in any grocery store. I don't make it super bright, but add enough to get a good color. I made a batch that lasted at least 6 months with no mold issues in Florida... and we just stored it in a baggie in the kitchen/craft area. No refrigeration.

My issue is never the kids' clothes... it's always finding smooshed up playdough throughout the house (especially on carpet). Of course, once it dries/hardens, it cleans up really well.
post #18 of 25

Playdough recipe

Follow this link for the best playdough I've ever used. I keep in zip-top bags in a basket so my sons can use it whenever they need it. It tastes yucky, and keeps forever. (I threw out the first batch because I had made it at 7 months ago and it was still great!) Use more food colouring than it calls for, and I just divide the dough into 4, throw it in medium zip-top bags, then add the food colouring and knead it in. I don't get my hands messy, and my son can help!

P.S. Michael Smith is a Canadian chef with a kid of his own, so he knows his playdough recipes!

http://www.chefmichaelsmith.ca/en/ho...0zJnJJRD0xMDk_
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by spammela22 View Post
P.S. Michael Smith is a Canadian chef with a kid of his own, so he knows his playdough recipes!

http://www.chefmichaelsmith.ca/en/ho...0zJnJJRD0xMDk_
OT: spammela, his recipes sound so yummy. I've been looking at the "Chef at Home" recipes and emailed quite a few to myself.

I hope his show turns up on our new Cooking channel. There are quite a few Canadian imports on it. (It's run by the Food Network, so they're putting a lot of the Canadian Food Network shows on it.)
post #20 of 25
Just a note if you don't know. Cream of tartar can be picked up cheap from winery, because it is the byproduct of the fermentation process. Amish or Mennonite stores, also, sell it super cheap.
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