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Is this normal? Can only donate Pepsi stuff cause of contract? - Page 2

post #21 of 48
Yes, it happens. Yes, they can do it. And yes, they probably DO mean even donated items.

My mom teaches at a school that has a contract like this. The school has major funding issues and they're a special ed heavy school, so they have very high needs. They were essentially forced into one of these contracts, and it is very unfortunate.

The teachers, even, are only allowed to drink beverages of the sponsored company if it's a labeled container.
post #22 of 48
Thread Starter 
I really appreciate the input. I have had lots of issues at the school and I am aware that can sometimes cause me to be a little more harsh/judgemental...

I am going to write to the school board to make sure that it is am accurate interpretation of the contract and if so, to be a voice of dissent in regards to it.

Anyone care to give me an idea on what to write?
post #23 of 48
This is why voting on the school board elections is very very important. Make sure that you mention that you will be voting during the next election in your letter.

My guess is that a big part of the reason the teachers sent a letter of apology was b/c they were hoping it might spur some parents into writing to the school board. Possibly you could get together with some of the other parents and the teachers, and come up with a form for the letter than all the parents could send them.

Also, check you towns calendar to see when the next board of ed meeting is taking place. Let everyone know about it and show up at it.
post #24 of 48
CCFC is on this already. They're a great organization if you don't already know about them.

"I recently blogged about questions regarding how PepsiCo's voluntary beverage guidelines, announced in March, would be implemented in schools given that contracts are made at the local level."

http://commercialfreechildhood.blogs...o-stealth.html

Strange stuff:

"This past March, soft drink giant PepsiCo announced with much fanfare a new global school policy. The specific guidelines, to take effect by 2012, limit the types of beverages that are to be sold in schools. According to the press release, the policy will "stop sales of full-sugar soft drinks to primary and secondary schools."

http://commercialfreechildhood.blogs...w-pepsico.html
post #25 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by zebra15 View Post
This is why I am so happy we homeschool. No limitations on what we can eat/drink. sheezez. Too much litigagation for 2nd grade if you ask me
Did you vote to approve the budget during the last local election?
post #26 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
I always thought it was kind of rude for homeschoolers to post this on threads about parents struggling with an issue about school. FYI.
I have to agree that it stings a little bit, especially since I expressly stated my regret at simply not being able to homeschooling right now
post #27 of 48
I would get clarification and find out why they needed the funding?

Sadly, many schools do need extra revenue to help makes end meet.

And yes, I would be annoyed at having send in pop. Our local pre-k started a healthy treat only policy but it wasn't school wide. I loved sending in a fruit tray or cheese etc, and the kids loved it as well.
post #28 of 48
The school may have a contract, but you don't, do you really have to follow their contract?
post #29 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackenzie View Post
I really appreciate the input. I have had lots of issues at the school and I am aware that can sometimes cause me to be a little more harsh/judgemental...

I am going to write to the school board to make sure that it is am accurate interpretation of the contract and if so, to be a voice of dissent in regards to it.

Anyone care to give me an idea on what to write?
You need to consider what your objections are: is it to commercial corporate contracts as a source of fundraising or is it to the specific contractual terms that prohibit other company's products in the school? One is a more philosophical argument about selling our schools (and our children) as advertising space and a monopolistic distribution pipeline. The other is more practical - not everyone wants to be limited to PepsiCo beverages, for a variety of reasons. Health is probably the most persuasive, but there's also a simple freedom of choice argument to be made.

Once you've identified your issue, outline all of your arguments.

Finally, identify what action you want the school board to take to remedy the problem. Suggest some solutions.

Here is a list of PepsiCo Brands. Tropicana and Aquafina products - juices and water - would be more appropriate for schools, IMO.
post #30 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
The school may have a contract, but you don't, do you really have to follow their contract?


Apparently, if we choose to donate to this particular event...
post #31 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
The school may have a contract, but you don't, do you really have to follow their contract?


Apparently, if we choose to donate to this particular event... At least that's what they are telling people...
post #32 of 48
Quote:
I think it's worth taking up with the school/school board - whoever entered into the contract. Even if they need the corporate funding, those companies have lots of beverage options. The schools don't have to allow soda. And yes, I know the sugar content is just as bad in juice and bottled water has lots of other issues. Either is a better option than soda though, which has no redeeming value at all.
I think in the short term you contact the organizers; the school board afterwards. It breaks down into this year's festival and future festivals/events.

I believe an important point to make, should you choose to emphasize health rather than the corporate funding angle, is that there are healthier options even from the Pepsi company.

Another set of questions I'd immediately have is this: who is organizing the Fall Festival? Teachers or PTA? Then ask the person in charge what the activities and funding goals are. In terms of activities, is it kid-oriented or adult oriented? If you have philosophical objections to soda, how else could you contribute. That's a question for whoever is heading up the organization of it. And I'm betting it's not the teachers--they have way too much to do--but perhaps a PTA committee.

In my recent experience with having a really strong opposite opinion, the approach that got good response was one that combined politely worded objections with constructive suggestions.

If letters are already going home, then it's too late to change the whole thing for this year. Can't make it soda-free. So you have to decide whether you do want to contribute to the event and if so, what you think a reasonable compromise would be. For example, you may not have a kid in 5th grade, but you're bringing water anyway. Or you won't contribute soda, but you'll give time (more valuable) or some other thing.

Highly doubt you're the only parent with objections.

A standard response to someone with complaints is to invite them to join the committee. It's occasionally (often?) a cynical response--not believing that the person will actually follow-through. Still, would be good to think about what level of involvement you want in school events.
post #33 of 48
Great post, Clara.

I wish I had the list of "how to" approach our school when you have a problem. From what I recall, they ask that you first come with the attitude of "I want to know more about this" and then with the attitude "Is there any way to change this". It's a good model.
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeguard View Post
I think maybe someone is misunderstanding the contract. Likely the school board has a contract with pepsi so that any cafeteria or machine can only sell pepsi products. But I highly doubt that actually extends to donations that are not being purchased with school funds.

Oy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
...So much wrong with that...can't even begin. Yes, write a letter...lots of letters!! Letter after letter.
and

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackenzie View Post
That is for the fifth grade to bring...

Hell, I would be okay with Sierra Mist since they recently stopped using HFCS, but I don't have a third grader
they did!? cool.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
Oh, no!! Is this an elementary school? :-( Mama, I would seriously contact Campaign For A Commercial Free Childhood and see if you can get them on your school district's case. I, personally, would skip the district and write directly to the state. I know we all hear shocking things all day but I can say that this is the craziest thing I feel like I've read about in a long time.
and again

Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post
Wow. Our schools have no-soft drink policies in place. In the middle school, there are vending machines (Coke or Pepsi, can't recall), mostly because there is a parallel community recreation program that uses the school facilities after school and on weekends. They are stocked with water and juice - no carbonated drinks from those companies. I can't recall ever seeing soft drinks at school events. Even the school formal and graduation dances only offered water or juice.

I think it's worth taking up with the school/school board - whoever entered into the contract. Even if they need the corporate funding, those companies have lots of beverage options. The schools don't have to allow soda. And yes, I know the sugar content is just as bad in juice and bottled water has lots of other issues. Either is a better option than soda though, which has no redeeming value at all.
sounds like a great district, and ita about it being entirely possible, even with the contract to go soda-free

Quote:
Originally Posted by eepster View Post
This is why voting on the school board elections is very very important. Make sure that you mention that you will be voting during the next election in your letter.

My guess is that a big part of the reason the teachers sent a letter of apology was b/c they were hoping it might spur some parents into writing to the school board. Possibly you could get together with some of the other parents and the teachers, and come up with a form for the letter than all the parents could send them.

Also, check you towns calendar to see when the next board of ed meeting is taking place. Let everyone know about it and show up at it.
great idea

Quote:
Originally Posted by zebra15 View Post
This is why I am so happy we homeschool. No limitations on what we can eat/drink. sheezez. Too much litigagation for 2nd grade if you ask me
me, too, and sounds like the OP would if she could right now

Mackenzie

Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
I always thought it was kind of rude for homeschoolers to post this on threads about parents struggling with an issue about school. FYI.
idk, we homeschool, but I work for both public and private schools, so these issues really do affect me and my family greatly...

The tone of the post seemed sympathetic to the OP, IMO, and in agreement about these types of issues being among the downsides to public school. I could be wrong, but it seemed supportive and not rude...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
The school may have a contract, but you don't, do you really have to follow their contract?
and a big

So sorry for this in your life and your dc's lives. Yucky. Most of the schools I'm involved with have soda machines accessible only to adults (at main office, in lounges, workrooms, etc.) Let us know how letter writing goes-- you've got some good ideas here-- and how it pans out.

blessings
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mum4vr View Post
The tone of the post seemed sympathetic to the OP, IMO, and in agreement about these types of issues being among the downsides to public school. I could be wrong, but it seemed supportive and not rude...


The OP said it stung and it seemed rude to me. I have NO doubt believing it was meant to be supportive but that's not how it seemed to me.

Occasionally I say something in a way that seems mean or insensitive on-line. That's *never* what I mean but I always appreciate knowing how it comes across. As teachers I think that would be especially important to know.
post #36 of 48
I have heard of contracts where they only buy certain products, but have never heard of a contract where they can only have or be given certain products.

You are not obligated to purchase Pepsi products. I would not do it. Seriously. Parents are not obligated to purchase a certain products because of some contract someone else has. I think it would be violation of some person freedoms law that a school board could make a contract with a company that would prevent people who attend the schools from using their own products on campus. Seriously.
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mum4vr View Post

idk, we homeschool, but I work for both public and private schools, so these issues really do affect me and my family greatly...

The tone of the post seemed sympathetic to the OP, IMO, and in agreement about these types of issues being among the downsides to public school. I could be wrong, but it seemed supportive and not rude...
I'm sure the intention is supportive but it's not really helpful, and the frequency of such comments on a board specific to schools can be a little irritating. I don't think it needs to be stated repeatedly on the "Learning at School" board that having children in school results in less freedom and input as to their educational environment. No one is asking for "I have my kids in school credentials," whether or not one has children in school doesn't mean they don't have something to contribute; it's just that "and that's why I'm glad I home school" isn't really helpful to someone who can't or doesn't want to.
post #38 of 48
I'd bring a giant case of Coke... and I don't really drink soda. Or the Blue Sky "natural" stuff if you have the cash.

But then I'm kind of passive-aggressive like that .

Honestly, I doubt it's required. But they MIGHT have language written into their contract that they have to "suggest" Pepsi brands for donations and such. The contracts that the soda companies manage to get with school districts can be just ridiculous. Most districts have gone soda-free, though it applies differently to after-school (and especially parent-attended) events. I know some parents who would just die in a gutter without their diet soda.
post #39 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blizzard_babe View Post
I'd bring a giant case of Coke... and I don't really drink soda. Or the Blue Sky "natural" stuff if you have the cash.

But then I'm kind of passive-aggressive like that .
I cannot say the thought has not crossed my mind
post #40 of 48
Honestly, in this case if Pepsi does in fact have a contract that even donations have to be Pepsi products I would play off that and seek out donations from Pepsi. "In keeping with our school district's decision to support Pepsi for the benefits Pepsi brings to our schools we are asking that Pepsi donate _____ for our Fall Fundraiser event. As well as providing a school community building event funds raised at this event will be purchasing _____ for the school."

Something I've learned over the last few months as PTA president is that most companies will donate things as long as you ask in the right way.

Oh, and I think it's bs that allegedly only Pepsi products can be donated.
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