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Roasted Chicken

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I am not sure if this is a traditional foods issue, but it seems like it.
I like roasted chicken. I make a very tasty roasted chicken, and after dinner I get all the meat off and make bone broth through the night.
So, my roasted chicken is tasty, but it is not falling off the bone succulent. How do I do this? I am afraid to cook it too long because I don't like chewy chicken. I assume it is a temp and time adjustment, and so many recipes have variations. I hate the idea of wasting a whole chicken to experiment.
So, how do I do it?
post #2 of 14
The only way I can make falling-off-the bone, juicy chicken is to use the crock pot. I chop 1 large onion up and place in the bottom of the crock pot. Then, mince 4 cloves of garlic, add 1 tsp. each of basil/oregano/thyme, 1 tbsp. salt, 1/2 tsp. of pepper, and a good glug of olive oil (several tbsp.). I use that mixture to rub the chicken and I stuff some of the mixture under the skin. Then toss the chicken in on top of the onions (breast side down), squirt the juice of one lemon over the chicken (if it's an organic lemon, place the peel in the cavity), and add chopped potatoes and carrots on top. I cover with the lid and cook on high for 1.5-2 hours, until piercing the thigh produces clear fluid and the meat is falling off the bones. Enjoy!

ETA: the 1.5-2 hours cook time is for a 1 lb. chicken
post #3 of 14
What temperature are you roasting it at? Is it covered or uncovered the whole time? how long are you cooking it for or are you temping it?
post #4 of 14
Try brining it.
post #5 of 14
I loosen the skin over the breasts, and then stuff between the meat and the skin with flat pats of butter, thyme, tarragon, and parsley. LOTS of butter. Then I roast at about 375, 20 minutes per pound. I start it in a cold oven, not in a preheated oven.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Lioness View Post
Try brining it.
Brining makes the chicken really juicy and flavorful and makes it seemingly impossible to overcook.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Llyra View Post
I loosen the skin over the breasts, and then stuff between the meat and the skin with flat pats of butter, thyme, tarragon, and parsley. LOTS of butter. Then I roast at about 375, 20 minutes per pound. I start it in a cold oven, not in a preheated oven.
Exactly that....but then I pour melted butter on top and sprinkle on some sea salt......usually ends up being about 1-1.5 hrs to roast it, uncovered.
post #8 of 14
roast chicken doesn't get falling off the bone succulent. It gets delicious and should be moist and tender and juicy, but it won't be falling off the bone. The only way I know to do that is stewing it or braising it or otherwise slow cooking in some liquid.
post #9 of 14
I've had roasted chicken fall off the bone succulent.

I season it (lemon pepper etc), and put it in a dutch oven, with about 1 teacup of water. Cook it in there on 350 for about 2 to 3 hours...falling off the bone (legs won't stay attached)...so delicious. Now I'm hungry for it.
post #10 of 14
I'm about to try this recipe. According to the comments, it really does fall off the bone. The trick is to cook it slowly for 5 hours (!). I like my regular roast chicken just fine, but I'm curious to try this method.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magelet View Post
roast chicken doesn't get falling off the bone succulent. It gets delicious and should be moist and tender and juicy, but it won't be falling off the bone. The only way I know to do that is stewing it or braising it or otherwise slow cooking in some liquid.
I'll have to invite you over for chicken sometime. Of course, as soon as I do that, I'll have an oven failure or something.

What I do is flip it halfway. Start the chicken breast down and I cook it until the skin is a beautiful brown color. Then I pull that skin off and eat it, and flip the whole bird over, and cook it until the skin is starting to turn brown. The breast skin will never turn the beautiful color that the back did, it'll be mottled because it's wet, but you can tell when it's browning. That's pretty much how I tell when my bird is done. Several times I've gone to tug on the drumstick, just to make sure, and come away with the bone in my hand.

Or you can also roast at a lower temp (275-300º), like how you do a turkey... it takes way longer, but gives you a succulent bird.
post #12 of 14
Do you cut into it right away? I've read if you do that before the juices 'settle' then the liquid drains out.
post #13 of 14
I flip my chicken halfway too, and it's plenty moist and juicy and yummy, but it doesn't actually fall off the bone either. Doesn't worry me, though.

We ate that rotisserie-style chicken last night... I think I overcooked it, but the skin was SO yummy I'll try it again. I might cook it for 4 hours rather than 5 next time (actually it was 5 and a bit, because we went for a walk, and it was a small bird). Worth a go, as long as you don't mind really spicy skin!
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ihugtrees View Post
Do you cut into it right away? I've read if you do that before the juices 'settle' then the liquid drains out.
That's actually true of any meat.
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