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What to bring on an international move? - Page 2

post #21 of 24
I live abroad and I find certain OTC medications that I am used to hard to find.

1) anti-itch cream (10% cortisone) that I use for bug bites and mild rashes.

2) Neosporin-type antibacterial topical cream. For some reason, this is not a commonly available thing in the drugstores here (don't know about Brazil) so I always stock up on a few tubes when I go the the USA

3) Benadryl (Diphenhydramine hydrochloride) - for some reason it's not commonly sold here. Also very good when fighting rashes brought on by infected scrapes or bug-bites. Instead, the antihistamine that's readily available here is Piriton (chlorphenamine maleate ).

re: savings

Find out if your bank in Brazil will allow you to have savings in multiple currencies. Here in Hong Kong it's very common, even among people who have no intention of leaving Hong Kong, but who want to spread risk in the face of currency volatility (e.g. have savings in Euros, US dollars, Australian dollars, and RMB in addition to HK dollars).

However, you may want to maintain a savings and checking account in the USA as well. That way you can do things like settle bills, or even mail b-day checks to nieces and nephews without it being a huge hassle.

re: cooking

The More with Less Cookbook - revised edition has a lot of great information about making things from scratch. I use their yoghurt instructions and a neighbor uses the "make at home baking mix" (kind of a do-it-yourself Bisquick, you can use whole grains if you want).

I have just gotten used to using metric measures (mostly). If you buy cookbooks there, they will use the local measures. I sometimes use both in the same recipes (grams of flour in a bread recipe, but using teaspoons of yeast).

Learn to garden a little. We have a roof terrace and grow rosemary, basil, bay leaf, dill, oregano, tarragon, parsley, and sage. Our thyme died and we are trying it again. Depending on where you are in Brazil, you may also be able to grow things like lemon grass (we've just started with those).

Good luck!
post #22 of 24
My kids (4 and 2) have spent all but a few weeks of their lives here in Spain in a trilingual household. Apart from me, books and films and occasional visits from my mom, they have very little exposure to English, yet it is their strongest language.... to the point where we're actually working harder at reenforcing DS's fluency with the local language (DP had got quite sloppy about speaking Catanglais). While I know that this strength in English has not been the same for other multi-lingual families here, we're the only ones I know well who homeschool and don't send the kids off to 40+ hours/week of school/childcare. I'm feeling pretty confident that we're doing just fine and there are soooooooooo many resources out there in English!
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skreader View Post
I live abroad and I find certain OTC medications that I am used to hard to find.

1) anti-itch cream (10% cortisone) that I use for bug bites and mild rashes.

2) Neosporin-type antibacterial topical cream. For some reason, this is not a commonly available thing in the drugstores here (don't know about Brazil) so I always stock up on a few tubes when I go the the USA

3) Benadryl (Diphenhydramine hydrochloride) - for some reason it's not commonly sold here. Also very good when fighting rashes brought on by infected scrapes or bug-bites. Instead, the antihistamine that's readily available here is Piriton (chlorphenamine maleate ).

re: savings

Find out if your bank in Brazil will allow you to have savings in multiple currencies. Here in Hong Kong it's very common, even among people who have no intention of leaving Hong Kong, but who want to spread risk in the face of currency volatility (e.g. have savings in Euros, US dollars, Australian dollars, and RMB in addition to HK dollars).

However, you may want to maintain a savings and checking account in the USA as well. That way you can do things like settle bills, or even mail b-day checks to nieces and nephews without it being a huge hassle.

re: cooking

The More with Less Cookbook - revised edition has a lot of great information about making things from scratch. I use their yoghurt instructions and a neighbor uses the "make at home baking mix" (kind of a do-it-yourself Bisquick, you can use whole grains if you want).

I have just gotten used to using metric measures (mostly). If you buy cookbooks there, they will use the local measures. I sometimes use both in the same recipes (grams of flour in a bread recipe, but using teaspoons of yeast).

Learn to garden a little. We have a roof terrace and grow rosemary, basil, bay leaf, dill, oregano, tarragon, parsley, and sage. Our thyme died and we are trying it again. Depending on where you are in Brazil, you may also be able to grow things like lemon grass (we've just started with those).

Good luck!
Oh, that's a great point about neosporin! I've always had trouble getting that abroad.

So with the money... how did you transfer it back and forth?

Oh, that cookbook sounds like something I'd really like, thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperBCN View Post
My kids (4 and 2) have spent all but a few weeks of their lives here in Spain in a trilingual household. Apart from me, books and films and occasional visits from my mom, they have very little exposure to English, yet it is their strongest language.... to the point where we're actually working harder at reenforcing DS's fluency with the local language (DP had got quite sloppy about speaking Catanglais). While I know that this strength in English has not been the same for other multi-lingual families here, we're the only ones I know well who homeschool and don't send the kids off to 40+ hours/week of school/childcare. I'm feeling pretty confident that we're doing just fine and there are soooooooooo many resources out there in English!

That's great to hear! DH was actually thinking of switching to English with DD if we move there. I'm skeptical if that will actually happen (he really loves Portuguese a lot!) plus his whole family is there so I'd be surprise if he really makes the switch. Unfortunately homeschooling is illegal there. It's something I'm pretty nervous about because I always liked the idea of homeschooling as a backup in case school didn't work out.
post #24 of 24
Mozambique?
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