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How do you feel about trick or treating and halloween? - Page 4

post #61 of 105
yeah i don't like halloween, we did tot when i was younger and it was fun, but we didn't go every year and i honestly didn't miss it.
post #62 of 105
Halloween/Samhain is a BIG deal in my family. We celebrate it with dressing up and baking and handing out candy, but also as a religious holiday. I'm super excited because we are having a dumb super this year and having friends and family over and making a huge altar for our ancestors. We don't really take dd tot, but I make pumpkin cupcakes and she gets to have a couple of vegan candies ( no more than I would normally give her). We're also going to a Halloween dance party the night before halloween at our Children's Museum and dd's favorite band, the Bunny Clogs, are playing there. I think we are celebrating every day that weekend ( including an adult's night out that saturday night, lol). Samhain is also the day I 'clean house' energetically speaking and re-do all of the house protection spells I set up at Imbolc. As a Pagan, it is also fun for me to see everyone celebrating a holiday that has Pagan roots
post #63 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittywitty View Post
No, actually it's not. It's based off of a Pagan holiday but the Catholic church basically created a holiday so the people could keep celebrating. Either way, it's a secular holiday in this country just like 4th of July. A time to dress up, be silly, and eat junk food. So the whole religious fear of this holiday has never made sense to me, personally. But then again, I was raised Jewish and so my sdad never cared at all about religion in regards to Halloween!
Well, the history of Halloween is actually more complicated than that. Its not based on a pagan holiday, although you can argue that the catholic/medieval traditions of All Hallows Eve had roots in an earlier pagan tradition. I love the idea of Samhain, but even that holiday was celebrated for centuries by Irish catholics who did not see the two spiritual traditions as separate. It was not until the reformation that many European religions were "purified" of traditions that people had been doing for a millennium (but that did not appear in the bible, so must not be christian). In any case Halloween was first celebrated in N.America by Irish (catholic) immigrants. To say it is pagan is to not acknowledge the synthesis between catholicism and region-specific traditions (that were once pagan sure...in the time of the Romans. But that had subsequently been celebrated by christians for a thousand years).

Sorry as a medievalist this is a big pet peeve of mine. The way neo-pagans have co-opted lots of this stuff, and have done a purification of their own, bugs me too.

Oh, and I don't mean that halloween is today celebrated as a religious holiday for most, just that I don't understand why many christians find it's traditions somehow...evil...or anti-god when the roots of Halloween are as a religious holiday.
post #64 of 105
Christmas and Easter have pagan roots too!
post #65 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittywitty View Post
We don't trick or treat in our neighborhood. Most of our neighbors do not hand out candy, and we drive up to where we were raised and have family so it's part family event. We have seen those same houses for 9+ years. Never figured it would bother anybody. A few years ago, we drove across town (in another part of the state) to trick or treat as our neighborhood had a big crime problem and several recent murders. The houses we trick or treated at were ecstatic to have us. Most of them said we were the only people they had seen that night, and it was late.
I don't mind when people travel out of their own neighbors for reasons like not having a neighborhood where folks participate. I loved our first year in our current house when we had, probably, around 200 kids. Our neighborhood has lots of kids, but I don't think *that* many. It was fun to see so many folks!

When it bothers me is:
1. When people drive their kids from house to house (we live somewhere that houses are very close together...it really isn't far to walk between houses, and even if it was far, so what).

2. When people drive around from neighborhood to neighborhood in search of more, more, more (we have had more than one little 3, 4, and 5 year old kids come to our house with large pillow cases stuffed to the brim, so heavy their parents had to carry it for them...it was so clear to me that this wasn't about the kids, who all looked exhausted and so *done* by that time).

3. When people specifically seek out our neighborhood because some houses give very generously (large handfuls, full-size bars, and even individually filled sandwich bags of candy). The reason this last one bothers me is because the kids are conditioned to think of that is the norm, and these are the kids who act disappointed and say rude things if given something normal, rather than a simple "thank you." I'm not blaming the folks who give generously. We've had years when we have been able to do that ourselves, and did it just for the delight of surprising the kids totally unexpectedly. But I blame parents who drive their kids specifically on a hunt for these houses because then houses that are generous are robbed of the delight of surprising kids, and the kids become conditioned toward entitlement.

4. I certainly hope that people don't leave their neighborhoods when there is no legitimate reason. If there are homes (apartments or houses) giving stuff out, it builds community and actually makes communities *safer* if neighbors get together and agree to participate as a community.
post #66 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbailey View Post
Man, I feel like I missed out Taking her trick or treating will let me make up for what I missed out on as a kid.
That's how I amabout so many of the experiences ds has. However we don't do halloween for religious reasons. We are thinking about chuck e cheese or something that night, because although I don't believe in halloween, I am a big believer in fun! nAnd I don't want my kid to feel he "missed out."
post #67 of 105
I ever cared much about it as a kid, but my DS (7) loves it, mostly for the candy and all the fun decorations, the whole bit. It's funny....as a Mom who doesn't like her kid to have junk food, I am not as concerned about the candy of Halloween per se, but the fact that almost all of it is made by one or two large companies who seem to get their chocolate from China. You remember a few years back when in China they were using tainted milk powder? I remember researching at the time to try and find out WHERE the chocolate for the Halloween candy was made and it was either (a) hard to find an answer or (b) made in China. I haven't looked into it this year. But the point is, it's just the same crap everywhere you look. I wish people gave out better-quality treats.

Now, this is a funny subject for me. For the first several years of my son's life, he didn't have candy. He didn't know what it was, he didn't miss it, didn't care. So for his first Halloween, I told about 5 local families that we'd be coming around, and could they please give him anything BUT candy (I even offered to provide it if they didnt have anything). I figured that the longer he went without knowing what candy was all about, the better, not only for his health but for our sanity at the store. LOL. He didn't watch kids programming TV so he never got bombarded with commercials. So he was oblivious. That first Halloween, he got pencils, toys, fruit rollups, cupcakes, cookies and a story I like to tell over & over again is this one neighbor whose husband answered the door and didn't know about my no-candy request (I had spoken with the wife). He thrust a bowl of candy at me and luckily my son was a little slow getting up to the door. I quickly whispered....do you have anything that's not candy? So he went back in and looked around and emerged..."I have a bagel." Well my son was thrilled. I think he was 4 years old at the time, and he was just delighted with his bagel. Hadn't a clue in the world how funny that was.

Those days are gone, of course, so if I want him to take part in the festivities with his friends, he has to ingest the food dyes, additives, and other sheer garbage that our thoughtful candy-makers put in their products. (rant , rant)
post #68 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
I just find the whole "parents taking the kids Trick or Treating" kind of ...meh.

When I was a kid, we went in groups of kids, no parents. Maybe some bigger and some smaller kids. If you weren't bit enough to go without your parents, you didn't go. So we were usually in groups ranging from 5yo to about 12yo.
I think that must have been partly regional. Everybody went with their parents when I was a kid, and that was in the early 70s.
post #69 of 105
Neo-pagans co-opted Halloween? First time I've heard that one!

Do you mind sharing your resources on that? Because I have yet to come across that theory.

http://www.history.com/topics/halloween
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween

You don't have to believe wiki, just scroll down to the list of resources and go to them instead.
post #70 of 105
My kids loved it. They continue on through HS here, and the kids all dress up. My daughter is having a few girls over to ToT, and then they're staying for fondue and movies.
post #71 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittywitty View Post
Neo-pagans co-opted Halloween? First time I've heard that one!

Do you mind sharing your resources on that? Because I have yet to come across that theory.

http://www.history.com/topics/halloween
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween

You don't have to believe wiki, just scroll down to the list of resources and go to them instead.
There is nothing in the Wiki article that contradicts anything I wrote above...in fact just the opposite. The article addresses the christian origins of Halloween, as well as touching on how it was celebrated as Hallowtide during the middle ages. In one of the books from the bibliography on that page (Death Makes a Holiday by David J. Skal) there is a great chapter on these origins (chapter 2: The Halloween Machine) .

As for paganism, it is a religion of reconstruction; its rituals and beliefs are modern reimaginings of pre-christian celtic religions. Most of this stuff has come down through christian cultures (what has not is indebted to anthropology/archeology) and as such it is sometimes...problematic...to assume there is any such thing as pagan ritual purity. Halloween is one such instance where the catholic origins of the festival are swept under the rug for the more interesting focus on Samhain. In my mind that is much like arguing that Dia de los Muertos is actually a pagan holiday even though most of its celebrants are deeply christian, because its rituals are a synthesis of christian and pre-christian elements.

If you are interested in other books that address medieval attitudes towards death just let me know. I've got 'em all .
post #72 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I think that must have been partly regional. Everybody went with their parents when I was a kid, and that was in the early 70s.
That's how it was for me, too. And I took my kids trick-or-treating probably until they were 10-12yo. Not out of fear, but because we moved every couple of years (military) and they didn't always know their way around town. We homeschool, so they didn't always have friends right nearby to TOT with. Most of their close friends live in different neighborhoods/towns.

We live in the city now, and there's no way I'd send a 5yo off with a pack of kids to navigate busy streets at night.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
I certainly hope that people don't leave their neighborhoods when there is no legitimate reason. If there are homes (apartments or houses) giving stuff out, it builds community and actually makes communities *safer* if neighbors get together and agree to participate as a community.
We've lived in this particular house/neighborhood for 2.5 years, and we don't TOT here. We spend Halloween with friends in a neighborhood a couple of miles away. They have a big party every year. Everyone shows up at their house a couple of hours early, we eat and drink and the kids get costumed up together (lots of fun), and then the kids go off to TOT while the parents have wine, chat, and give out candy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalia the Muse View Post
Christmas and Easter have pagan roots too!
And some fundamentalist Christians don't celebrate Christmas because it's not Biblical. They also celebrate Easter in a Biblical way, and not with eggs and bunnies.
post #73 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I think that must have been partly regional. Everybody went with their parents when I was a kid, and that was in the early 70s.
Same here... and we were like a super small town so I don't think it was a safety issue... the parents just walked with the kids. Not the really big kids-- I think we started walking by ourselves when we were like 10 because our parents turned into dorks right around then and we couldn't be seen with them in public.

But, ToT was definitely a family activity.
post #74 of 105
I love Halloween, I love coming up with creative costumes, I love trick-or-treating. It's not as unsafe as we've all been led to believe. Most of the poisonings were hoaxes and most of the real ones involved wrapped candy ( see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisoned_candy_scare ). A History channel documentary also stated the same thing. I'm so excited about trick-or-treating I'm going to dress my baby up and take him out trick-or-treating even though he's only 8 months old and people will probably think it's a ridiculous ploy to get candy.

What scares me most about Halloween is high-fructose corn syrup, partially hydrogenated fats, artificial colorings and sweeteners, etc. etc. I'm seriously considering watching "Supersize Me" or "King Corn" for Halloween because they're two of the scariest movies I can think of. "Food Inc." would be the scariest, but I'm not sure I've got the stomach to watch that one again.

My husband and I believe very strongly in a wholesome, plant-based diet. I really wish people would give out apples, cute little toys, pennies, or even homemade baked goods. This year will be easy because my son hasn't got any teeth and his main goody is breastmilk. We'll just go around the neighborhood and toss the candy after. I'm figuring I can probably get away with the same plan next year. Maybe by 2012 I can rig up a healthy trick-or-treat with my church group or something.
post #75 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicky85 View Post
My husband and I believe very strongly in a wholesome, plant-based diet. I really wish people would give out apples, cute little toys, pennies, or even homemade baked goods. This year will be easy because my son hasn't got any teeth and his main goody is breastmilk. We'll just go around the neighborhood and toss the candy after. I'm figuring I can probably get away with the same plan next year. Maybe by 2012 I can rig up a healthy trick-or-treat with my church group or something.
That seems pretty wasteful. Why collect candy to toss it? You don't have to trick or treat to wear a costume.
post #76 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicky85 View Post

My husband and I believe very strongly in a wholesome, plant-based diet. I really wish people would give out apples, cute little toys, pennies, or even homemade baked goods. This year will be easy because my son hasn't got any teeth and his main goody is breastmilk. We'll just go around the neighborhood and toss the candy after. I'm figuring I can probably get away with the same plan next year. Maybe by 2012 I can rig up a healthy trick-or-treat with my church group or something.
YOu should go around the neighborhood and just say "hi" instead of taking the candy and then tossing it. Or you could hand out healthy goodies to your neighbors. Reverse trick-or-treating
post #77 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicky85 View Post
I love Halloween, I love coming up with creative costumes, I love trick-or-treating. It's not as unsafe as we've all been led to believe. Most of the poisonings were hoaxes and most of the real ones involved wrapped candy ( see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisoned_candy_scare ). A History channel documentary also stated the same thing. I'm so excited about trick-or-treating I'm going to dress my baby up and take him out trick-or-treating even though he's only 8 months old and people will probably think it's a ridiculous ploy to get candy.

What scares me most about Halloween is high-fructose corn syrup, partially hydrogenated fats, artificial colorings and sweeteners, etc. etc. I'm seriously considering watching "Supersize Me" or "King Corn" for Halloween because they're two of the scariest movies I can think of. "Food Inc." would be the scariest, but I'm not sure I've got the stomach to watch that one again.

My husband and I believe very strongly in a wholesome, plant-based diet. I really wish people would give out apples, cute little toys, pennies, or even homemade baked goods. This year will be easy because my son hasn't got any teeth and his main goody is breastmilk. We'll just go around the neighborhood and toss the candy after. I'm figuring I can probably get away with the same plan next year. Maybe by 2012 I can rig up a healthy trick-or-treat with my church group or something.
I would love to hand out baked goods but the reality is that most people still believe in that urban legend and would just trash it like you do the candy.
post #78 of 105
My husband and I have never been too fond of trick or treating for one reason only but we let them go anyway a few years. Mostly they opted for the parties. This year they have decided that they don't want to go anymore and when we asked them why, they gave us the very reason that we don't like it for and we've never even told them why, LOL! All year, every day, we teach them not to take things from strangers but then what do we do on Halloween? We send them out to take candy from strangers. We couldn't be happier that they decided on their own that it just doesn't seem right and would rather stay home.
post #79 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2xy View Post
That's how it was for me, too. And I took my kids trick-or-treating probably until they were 10-12yo. Not out of fear, but because we moved every couple of years (military) and they didn't always know their way around town. We homeschool, so they didn't always have friends right nearby to TOT with. Most of their close friends live in different neighborhoods/towns.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelly1101 View Post
Same here... and we were like a super small town so I don't think it was a safety issue... the parents just walked with the kids. Not the really big kids-- I think we started walking by ourselves when we were like 10 because our parents turned into dorks right around then and we couldn't be seen with them in public.

But, ToT was definitely a family activity.
All this. I know my dad looked forward to taking us out every year, and was bummed the couple of times he had to work late that night. (He was a furniture mover, and very long days at month end are/were common...but he usually managed to dodge that on Halloween.) Last year, a bunch of the kids in our townhouse complex went out togeether, but most of the parents went along - for fun. I enjoy seeing everyone's houses and decorations, and getting a chance to interact (albeit briefly) with neighbours that I rarely get a chance to talk to.
post #80 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2xy View Post
We've lived in this particular house/neighborhood for 2.5 years, and we don't TOT here. We spend Halloween with friends in a neighborhood a couple of miles away. They have a big party every year. Everyone shows up at their house a couple of hours early, we eat and drink and the kids get costumed up together (lots of fun), and then the kids go off to TOT while the parents have wine, chat, and give out candy.
I was talking in context about folks leaving their neighborhoods to trick-or-treat elsewhere.

I have been known to go to Halloween parties too, though personally I can't stand to miss the kids trick-or-treating and prefer to stay home.
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