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How do you feel about trick or treating and halloween? - Page 5

post #81 of 105
I don't view throwing candy away as wasting food since I fervently believe it is better off in the garbage than in stomachs. It has no nutritional value and is harmful to our bodies. That being said, saying hi is an even better option since we don't want the candy. So thanks for the suggestion! I stand corrected on my position.

I too would hand out fruit or baked goods to trick or treaters, but I know people probably wouldn't even accept because of how entrenched the urban legends are. It's sad because I've heard that way back in the day people had a lot of fun getting homemade treats.
post #82 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
I was talking in context about folks leaving their neighborhoods to trick-or-treat elsewhere.
We move a lot for my DH's job but generally live in a newish neighborhood with houses close together, and we therefore always get kids who don't live in the neighborhood.

I think it's all good. Kids who live in the country, in apartments, in no fun neighborhoods, etc. can come walk around and enjoy the decorations and grownups sitting in lawn chairs handing out candy. I'd really hate to be such a neighborhood snob that I could only buy candy for the kids in my neighborhood. That's just.... icky.

I love Halloween. I love seeing the little kids in costumes. I love seeing the ridiculous things my neighbors do to their houses. The whole thing is just so silly and pointless and fun.

Plus, my mother hates Halloween and never let me have a good one. I'm making up for it now.
post #83 of 105

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Edited by Cascadian - 6/2/11 at 8:43pm
post #84 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
We move a lot for my DH's job but generally live in a newish neighborhood with houses close together, and we therefore always get kids who don't live in the neighborhood.

I think it's all good. Kids who live in the country, in apartments, in no fun neighborhoods, etc. can come walk around and enjoy the decorations and grownups sitting in lawn chairs handing out candy. I'd really hate to be such a neighborhood snob that I could only buy candy for the kids in my neighborhood. That's just.... icky.

I love Halloween. I love seeing the little kids in costumes. I love seeing the ridiculous things my neighbors do to their houses. The whole thing is just so silly and pointless and fun.

Plus, my mother hates Halloween and never let me have a good one. I'm making up for it now.
In the places I knew where this happened a lot, it was really overwhelming to the people though. It gets very expensive very quickly. I sympathize with kids living in rural areas wanting the same experience they see on tv, but when I was growing up, they just handled the whole trick-or-treating thing differently - going mostly to friends and relatives, having parties, and larger hand-outs at each house. I just don't think it's a matter of being snobby when you can spend hundreds of dollars on candy, and the kids are ticked if you turn off your light early - there seems to be some kind of sense of entitlement there.
post #85 of 105
What a fascinating thread!

I really don't like how some Halloween celebrations focus on the "gore" but then again, I don't like how much of Christmas focuses on consumerism. We still celebrate Christmas, but emphasize family traditions, religious roots, spending time with family/friends/church. For Halloween, we enjoy dressing up, carving pumpkins, and joining in neighborhood celebrations. We choose to ignore the parts we don't like, and enjoy/emphasize the parts we do like.

I find the messages in the witch/ghost/skeletons/graveyards/severed body parts/ghoulish brews rather confusing. For example, witches. When my kiddos see a "halloween witch" what are they learning? Most people who identify themselves as a witch to my kiddos are going to be person practicing Wicca, and aren't going to be anything like a "Halloween witch". How about people who were labeled as witches and then killed (we live near Salem)? Are those people the same kind of witches? Are all people who are ugly like "halloween witches" evil? Are people who are pretty always nice? I dunno, just a lot of mixed messaging there!

I don't get worked up about this stuff when I see a person handing out candy on Halloween dressed as a "witch", these are just things I think about when I look at a lot of the typical halloween decorations, and reasons that I would prefer to introduce concepts of witches, ghosts, spirits, death/dying to my kids on my own, rather than the messaging that they get from what's becoming a burgeoning consumerist holiday.

When I was a kid, we did two trick-or-treating nights - my grandparent's town celebrated on All Hallow's Eve, so we would TOT there, then at all the nearby relatives, since they loved seeing us. Then, since we lived in a rural area, one of our neighbors got the idea to throw a bunch of hay in the back of their pick-up, and kids/parents would ride around in the back of the truck going door to door for candy (how in the world did my uber-safety conscious parents ever allow that?!?!?)

In our neighborhood, we have a big park nearby with a large pond in the middle. On the Saturday closest to Halloween, the whole neighborhood turns out to decorate small paper bags for luminaries that go all around the path around the pond, carve pumpkins for a huge lit pumpkin patch, and then do various stations - ghoulish brews, a graveyard, etc. (We skip the latter part, but we really enjoy the rest!) Its a great way for the whole community to get out together as families, and the kids get another chance to wear their outfits
post #86 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
I was talking in context about folks leaving their neighborhoods to trick-or-treat elsewhere.

I have been known to go to Halloween parties too, though personally I can't stand to miss the kids trick-or-treating and prefer to stay home.
Well, you said you hope people don't leave their neighborhoods for no legitimate reason. I guess one person's legitimate reason isn't another's.

It's been slightly different with every neighborhood we've lived in, but now we both attend a party AND tot in another neighborhood. My kids and their friends like to tot together. None of my boys' friends live in our neighborhood. One friend is here part-time, as his uncle and aunt care for him when his mother works.

Most of our neighborhood is retirees and single people. Not many kids, so nobody really gets into Halloween here. The first year we lived here, we left a bowl of candy and a note on our porch, and there was still candy in it when we got home.
post #87 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
We move a lot for my DH's job but generally live in a newish neighborhood with houses close together, and we therefore always get kids who don't live in the neighborhood.
We live in an *old* neighborhood with houses *very* close together, and yes, we too always get kids who don't live in the neighborhood.

Quote:
I think it's all good. Kids who live in the country, in apartments, in no fun neighborhoods, etc. can come walk around and enjoy the decorations and grownups sitting in lawn chairs handing out candy.
That describes our neighborhood on Halloween.

I don't mind any of that.

Quote:
I'd really hate to be such a neighborhood snob that I could only buy candy for the kids in my neighborhood. That's just.... icky.
My position came across over several posts, so I feel it has been lost. I have not said anything about buying candy only for the kids in my neighborhood (nor has anyone else).

In fact, in one of my first posts about this, I specifically said how much I enjoyed having ~200 kids my first year in this house (and we "closed shop" a little early for our kids to go to bed), knowing that many were not from my neighborhood.

I don't mind kids coming from other neighborhoods.

My position in regard to the "good" it does for neighborhoods to come together as communities and participate rather than driving kids elsewhere has nothing to do with the welcome I feel toward kids from elsewhere when they come to my neighborhood. I know it is not always possible to trick-or-treat in one's own neighborhood, and I adore the chance to see these kids in my neck of the woods.

What I was trying to say is that I DO think trick-or-treating is good for communities, and helps make them safer, which is why I advocate that neighborhoods try to make a tradition of it. And I DO hope that folks stay in their neighborhoods for that reason...for the reason of creating community among neighbors.

But I feel joy to have kids come into my 'hood and love the chance to say hello, whatever neighborhood they come from.

That said, as I have stated a couple of times, what bothers me is when parents drive their kids from neighborhood to neighborhood (and especially when they do it house to house) in search of the most candy.

I remember this from when I was a kid too. One of my friend's had a mom who was always like "Let me take you to [name a neighborhood]. We can totally score there!" My friend was in my own neighborhood and there were plenty of treats there (even in the apartment and condo complexes and buildings where we lived). It didn't seem kid-motivated until later. In the young years, it was always my friend's mom.

I think this kind of parental attitude cultivates a spirit of greed about the whole thing in families, and I saw that manifested in my neighborhood some a couple of years ago and a whole LOT this last year in examples I gave in my posts. When I turned out the lights early, it had to have been bad because like I said, I love Halloween and am a very patient person with other people's kids...especially those learning to be kind.
post #88 of 105
I *love* Halloween. I always have. It's also DD's favorite holiday (and the day before her birthday). It's so wonderful . . . I love that all the neighbors are hanging out on their lawns, chatting and catching up, and how it turns in to a lovely fall gathering, with the kids running around in their costumes until late at night having the time of their lives. It always seems to turn into a big block party.

We're a vegan family who eats very health-consciously, but I would never skip Halloween because of the candy connotation. DD keeps the toys/stickers/pencils/nonfood items people give out and the stuff she can eat--pretzels, raisins, popcorn, etc.--and the next day sells the rest to a local dentist who does a post-Halloween-candy-buyback every year and sends the candy to the troops overseas.

We're having a big Halloween birthday party for DD and she and her friends are so excited for it .
post #89 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pumpkin_Pie View Post
I loved it as a kid, was sad when I couldn't do it anymore as a teen and am SUPER excited that DS is old enough to really, really GET it this year! I can't wait for Halloween! Now to get cracking on his costume!!
I was so happy when dd got old enough to enjoy it and then ds I am looking forward to it this year though I wont be able to enjoy as much of the yummy candy as I have in the past

Where we live is very rural and I dont know any of the neighbors really. So I take the kids and go down to my parents then my brother and I take the kids to the houses down there. That is where I grew up and we know almost everyone so we can go to their houses knowing it is safe.

Adults have to go with the kids here since driving is the only way to get to the houses.
post #90 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindsayK View Post
I find the messages in the witch/ghost/skeletons/graveyards/severed body parts/ghoulish brews rather confusing. For example, witches. When my kiddos see a "halloween witch" what are they learning? Most people who identify themselves as a witch to my kiddos are going to be person practicing Wicca, and aren't going to be anything like a "Halloween witch". How about people who were labeled as witches and then killed (we live near Salem)? Are those people the same kind of witches? Are all people who are ugly like "halloween witches" evil? Are people who are pretty always nice? I dunno, just a lot of mixed messaging there!
We call them "storybook witches" since we have a family friend who's a regular witch. And there certainly are some great storybook witches.

I don't mind the confusion...when I look at the err...vast range...of people who call themselves Christians I figure witch confusion is the least of my concerns.
post #91 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindsayK View Post
I find the messages in the witch/ghost/skeletons/graveyards/severed body parts/ghoulish brews rather confusing. For example, witches. When my kiddos see a "halloween witch" what are they learning? Most people who identify themselves as a witch to my kiddos are going to be person practicing Wicca, and aren't going to be anything like a "Halloween witch". How about people who were labeled as witches and then killed (we live near Salem)? Are those people the same kind of witches? Are all people who are ugly like "halloween witches" evil? Are people who are pretty always nice? I dunno, just a lot of mixed messaging there!
You can blame Disney (and Hollywood) for most of this confusion, especially the perception of "witches"... not Halloween. I agree that wicca has little to do with pop-culture's idea of "witch".
post #92 of 105
Quote:
You can blame Disney (and Hollywood) for most of this confusion, especially the perception of "witches"... not Halloween. I agree that wicca has little to do with pop-culture's idea of "witch".
The Brothers Grimm predate Hollywood and Disney by a long shot, and there you will find negative images of witches. In all of early Christian Europe and in early America, witches were perceived as evil. Hollywood and Disney didn't make this stuff up. Let's face it, there have been no positive views of witches, at least in the U.S., until very recently. I don't think that the pop culture idea of witches is anything new. Rather, I think recent pop-culture stereotypes (as in 20th century) simply borrows from very old stereotypes.
post #93 of 105
Very old stereotypes based off of witch-hunting and a church that wanted to kill the competition.

Chamomile_Girl, this part should be taken to the Spirituality forum so we don't get too OT. If you would like to start a thread still claiming that we owe Halloween to Christianity and how all of us "neo-pagans" wouldn't have anything without the church, then go on ahead.
post #94 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
You can blame Disney (and Hollywood) for most of this confusion, especially the perception of "witches"... not Halloween. I agree that wicca has little to do with pop-culture's idea of "witch".
Yes, true... I wasn't meaning to say that its halloween's "fault" for this kind of messaging - its seen all over the place in our culture, such as in Disney, and we skip those movies, too! But, its very much in your face at halloween.

I like the idea of the PP who describes these witches as "storybook witches" I think I will use that!
post #95 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicky85 View Post

I too would hand out fruit or baked goods to trick or treaters, but I know people probably wouldn't even accept because of how entrenched the urban legends are. It's sad because I've heard that way back in the day people had a lot of fun getting homemade treats.
I have never heard urban legends about baked goods, though I have about store bought candy and freaky people putting things in it. I wouldn't allow my dd to eat a homemade treat though because I have no idea if the person washes properly after using the restroom, made sure their hair was back so no disease carrying strands got into the treat, or keeps a sanitary kitchen. I have gotten sick so many times from homemade things at potlucks so I really try to avoid them if I am not aware of the cleanliness factor.

I have always loved Halloween, though I wasn't allowed to take part in it until my mother stopped attending small cult-like churches where they believed it was unsafe to go outside of your home on Halloween unless you were going in the car to the church where you would be safe with the other people there for the Harvest Party. My dd also likes Halloween a lot and has even talked her grandpa into decorating the house two years in a row because she is so enthusiastic about it, and he is wrapped around her little finger. Like a previous poster, I think it is really neat that so many people get together to celebrate a day devoted to making kids totally happy. I only wish that fruits and vegetables were as exciting to get as a huge chocolate bar!
post #96 of 105
When I was little Halloween did not exist.
We have adopted this tradition over the last 5-10 years or so.
These days most kids i know do the trick or treating.
I think it`s ok, and off course i LOVE to see my kids having fun.
I don`t know if we do it the same way you guys do it.
We haven`t so far bought a pumpkin and cut it to be a face or anything, but I guess we should try.
Many norwegians (especcially the older ones, off course) hates it and think it`s all brought to our contry so that the shops will sell a lot of stuff related to halloween. They have a point, but it still is fun for the kids.

I make my kids draw/paint "scary" images, and we use that as the trick.
We follow in the background as our kids knock on the doors and asks "Trick or treat!" They usually get some candy, some give cookies or fruits. If they don`t get anything they will give the person one of their scary paintings as a trick. My kids love to dress up, and look forward to this every year.
They are NOT allowed to do any other kind of tricks.
Every year complainers write in the newspapers after halloween that they got their windows cowered in eggs and stuff like that. That is not acceptable at all. I guess that is older kids walking alone, and their parents don`t know...
post #97 of 105
I've lived in a country where Hallowe'en wasn't a tradition and was a fairly new growing celebration. It is a little odd trying to explain what it's all about. And yes, there were routinely letters to the editor about how obnoxious this imported holiday is and how it shouldn't be encouraged. We didn't do any trick-or-treat or shelling out then, but we did put up some decorations and make some Hallowe'en treats.

I found that without Hallowe'en or Thanksgiving, the Christmas commercials and decorations started to appear in September. Now that seems obnoxious .
post #98 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post
I found that without Hallowe'en or Thanksgiving, the Christmas commercials and decorations started to appear in September. Now that seems obnoxious .
Hell, that happens here even with Halloween and Thanksgiving.
post #99 of 105
I am not a fan of Halloween for a variety of reasons. Growing up we went to Harvest Festivals (sponsored by local churches) but weren't allowed to trick-or-treat. I remember one year in junior high my mom let me have some friends over for a party.

I don't like the dark/scary/evil decorations and costumes. I don't like the mass quantities of candy made of HCFS/artificial dyes/artificial everything! I do like seeing children dressed up though, and have tried handing out candy although usually only a handful of children stopped by.

My DD will be three this year, 2 days before Halloween. I hate that each year we have to plan her birthday celebrations around a "holiday" I don't even like. We don't talk about Halloween at our house and will not be trick-or-treating. If our church as a Harvest/Fall Festival we'll go to that.

I'm ready for Thanksgiving!
post #100 of 105
We are going to hold off on trick or treating as long as possible. We had a smores party last year and it was a blast. We plan to do it again this year.
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