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meditation on a budget

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm interested in starting a formal meditation practice, and though I know I can do this on my own at home, I feel like I would be better off with a teacher right now. But all the classes seem prohibitively expensive, in the $25 dollar range. That's do-able on occasion, but nothing I could indulge in once or twice a week. Any suggestions?
post #2 of 12
what if you just do it with a teacher one time? then you could put that into practice at home. then maybe do it again in a few months.

i just use stuff from yoga and reiki.
post #3 of 12
post #4 of 12
The local tibetan group near my house (well, my old house) used to have free meditation classes. I don't even know if they asked for any sort of donation. They also had regular mediation group/practice open to the public at least once per week... but probably 2-3 x/week (it's been awhile).

You might want to see if there is a similar group in your area.

Another option would be to simply ask if there was any sort of discount available or to offer to barter something in exchange. Could you clean up the space after the class? Do some marketing/brochures? Etc.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Wow, thanks. I appreciate all the ideas. Can I ask a follow-up now? In my reading and researching I've come across countless references to the various traditions behind certain meditation styles, but I haven't found a good summary that has helped me understand how they relate/differ (or how they would influence the meditation itself). I'm not sure it matters at this stage, but I'd like to learn more. Any suggestions? Thanks, again!
post #6 of 12
I know you want a teacher but I'm just throwing out this option in case you can't find/afford one.

http://www.amazon.com/Kundalini-Yoga.../dp/B0035AO4X6

I tried to find a drop-in/teacher meditation group in my area. And yes, the Buddhist groups in my area and the Unitarian churches offered groups - but they all required a donation or fee. And the hours didn't work with my own childcare responsibilities.

I bought this dvd and it has, I believe, about 2-3 hours worth of meditation segments. I can spend as long or as short as I want doing these meditation exercises of Ravi & Ana's. I find the music wonderfully soothing and quite beautiful. The dvd is very well chaptered.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bananahands View Post
In my reading and researching I've come across countless references to the various traditions behind certain meditation styles, but I haven't found a good summary that has helped me understand how they relate/differ (or how they would influence the meditation itself).
I like Journey of Awaking: A Meditator's Guidebook by Ram Dass. It's a very nice place to start and has a chapter called "Picking a Path." It describes various paths and encourages you to try different ones.

I think that going to classes is GREAT (I went to a meditation class just today!) but the real power of meditating comes from a personal practice, setting aside even 10-15 minutes a day just to be quiet with yourself. Classes can help you on your path, but it is a very personal path.

I'm glad you asked the question because it inspired to my dig out this book, and I now I think I'll re-read it.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
... but the real power of meditating comes from a personal practice, setting aside even 10-15 minutes a day just to be quiet with yourself.
:

You can find free, open to all meditation instruction at any Buddhist center. Additionally, they will often have free, weekly community sit-ins that are also helpful.

I started my meditation practice with Jack Kornfield's Meditation for Beginners


Jon Kabat-Zinn's Mindfulness for Beginners is also very good.
post #9 of 12
You might also like the Wildmind Buddhist Meditation site. Lots of information and resources.

In regards to your questions about meditation styles:

This is a pretty good overview.
post #10 of 12
If you are not near a Buddhist center, you might try a Unitarian Universalist (UU) church. It is not uncommon to have meditation/mindfulness classes as part of the offerings there.

Shambala Sun website has a wonderful collection of articles for those new to meditation. If one of the teachers resonates with you, you often can find videos on youtube that might help, too. In my experience, as far as accessibility, Shambala practices give very clear, simple instructions on how to help your body and mind rest.

Thich Naht Hanh's approach to mindfulness also can be very helpful. The Miracle of Mindfulness is a nice introduction you might even find on audio at your library.

good luck!
post #11 of 12
I love Kundalini Yoga and Meditation. You can usually find classes locally for $10-15/class.

After going to a few classes, you'll probably understand enough to follow along meditations given in a Kundalini Yoga book.
post #12 of 12
ecknath eswaran also has a nice book, titled meditation, that takes you through many different styles to see what resonates with you.

(hi kanga. nice to see you. we're busy here, how are you?)
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