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White Whole Wheat flour

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
What is the difference b/w white whole wheat flour & whole wheat flour? Is it just a different variety of wheat or is it processed differently?

Do you use it in specific recipes or can you sub it for AP flour? Or can you only use it in place of WW flour?

thanks!!
post #2 of 19
I use it like my regular "white" flour...

I think my bag says that it's "aged" and that turns it white or something...
post #3 of 19
I use it in place of white flour. In cookies, cakes, everything. I can't tell a difference.
post #4 of 19
Yes, it's a different type of wheat. Most likely hard white (most soft white is marketed as 'whole wheat pastry flour').
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhiOrion View Post
I use it in place of white flour. In cookies, cakes, everything. I can't tell a difference.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by blumooned View Post
What is the difference b/w white whole wheat flour & whole wheat flour? Is it just a different variety of wheat or is it processed differently?
Oh, interesting... I didn't know there was a WHITE whole wheat flour. Or, I never noticed. (I don't buy flour often.)

I knew wheat flour doesn't have the germ like whole wheat flour. But, all you have to do is add 1 Tbsp of wheat germ to 1 cup wheat flour for "whole wheat flour".
post #7 of 19
I didn't know there was a white whole wheat flour, either. I always just use whole wheat pastry flour in place of regular flour in a recipe. It's so light it comes out just the same.
post #8 of 19
post #9 of 19
I love king arthur flour...nothing I bake ever turns out as good without it!
post #10 of 19
Yup, its just a different type of wheat. *most* "whole wheat flour" is from hard red wheat of some sort (bread flour is usually hard red spring wheat), where the "white" ww is usually hard white winter wheat and ww "pastry" flour is usually soft white winter wheat. I think. Its been a while since I did all my wheat researching...
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone! I just bought a bag b/c I saw it next to the WW flour & both were on sale. I had heard of it before but never actually tried it. I'm going to just use it instead of AP flour & see what happens. If there is no difference, I'm definitely going to switch permanently!! There's gotta be a lot more nutrition in the whole stuff, white or not.
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm bumping this thread back up b/c I need more advice!

 

I've used the white WW flour a few times & so far everything I've made with it is tasting bitter to me.  Anyone else ever have this problem?  Is there any way to fix it?

 

So far, I've made cranberry bread, blueberry muffins, and pizza crust - I didn't do anything else different except switch out all the AP flour for white WW.  I've baked using 1/2 AP & 1/2 WW and don't remember things being bitter.

 

Any advice is appreciated!! smile.gif

post #13 of 19

IME, whole grains are bitter. You could try decreasing the amount of WW flour by replacing a bit of the whole grian flour with all-purpose flour. You could also try to mask the flavor by increasing the other flavors a bit- add a bit of extra salt or extracts or sugar, or switch to more flavorful fats.

post #14 of 19

Whole grain flours don't have to be bitter.  My whole wheat isn't-- but it does start to taste bitter when it's old and starting to go rancid.  Could it be that the flour you purchased was old, or stored at improper temperatures?  This flour should be refrigerated, like any whole grain, or frozen for long-term storage. 

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by blumooned View Post

I'm bumping this thread back up b/c I need more advice!

 

I've used the white WW flour a few times & so far everything I've made with it is tasting bitter to me.  Anyone else ever have this problem?  Is there any way to fix it?

 

So far, I've made cranberry bread, blueberry muffins, and pizza crust - I didn't do anything else different except switch out all the AP flour for white WW.  I've baked using 1/2 AP & 1/2 WW and don't remember things being bitter.

 

Any advice is appreciated!! smile.gif



We found things to taste bitter when using King Arthur brand white whole wheat flour. I have not noticed that bitter taste since trying other brands.

post #16 of 19

We use it for everything, and yeah it's a little bitter. We've gotten used to it though and don't really mind it anymore.

post #17 of 19

I find an undertone with almost all my whole grain flours- this isn't limited to wheat. Its also not related to age, I have a tremendous turnover rate of baking supplies!

post #18 of 19

WW shouldn't taste bitter - if it does, its going rancid. WW flour goes rancid incredibly fast (like, within 2-4wks after being ground), so its likely that if your flour tastes rancid its simply sat on a shelf somewhere for too long. Avoiding rancid ww flour, ime is only possible one of two ways: finding a store w/ fast enough turnover that they're constantly shipping in fresh stuff (and THAT fresh stuff hasn't sat in a warehouse for months), or by grinding your own.

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the input!  Maybe it is already or close to being rancid - it smells OK, though.  It's not King Arthur brand, just the store brand from my local grocery store.  They may not have huge turnover for whole grain flours.  I guess I'll just keep using it & see how it goes.

 

Oddly enough, we made blueberry pancakes today using it & they were not bitter at all.  Maybe the blueberries (or the syrup) covered the taste. shrug.gif

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