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Fish, Breastmilk and Contamination

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I am breastfeeding my two and half year old daughter and I am considering adding some fish to my diet. I understand that we can only have certain types of fish and no more than 12 ounces a week.

Do the contaminants from fish I eat end up in my breastmilk?
If I gave my daughter fish to eat and eat the fish myself also, she would be getting twice the amount of contaminants allowable, correct?
How do I handle this? Which fish should we eat in this situation and does this situation change the amount of fish that is safe for her?
Please tell me what rules you follow or perhaps direct me somewhere else to learn more.
Thank you so much!
post #2 of 4
http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/c...endations.aspx

That link is a good resource for determining what kinds of fish are safe in what volumes. Generally long living predatory fish are more contaminated than fish with a shorter lifespan. Typically wild caught is safer than farmed.

Remember that your body filters out harmful things. Not everything you eat ends up directly in your breastmilk.
post #3 of 4
Wild Alaskan seafood has very little contaminants in it because the ocean environment is cleaner. Also the Alaskan fisheries are really well managed, so you don't have to worry about environmental impact.

I would really recommend adding fish to your diet, it's really the only source of long-chain omega 3 fatty acids, which are soooo good for your brain and heart and eyes, and especially important for the brain development of your child.

I think salmon has the highest levels of omega 3's and the least contaminants...
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys! Back to research.... bleh
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