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how do you deal with halloween candy? - Page 2

post #21 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat View Post
Dd has free access to all her candy as long as she is eating her regular meals, brushes her teeth and puts the wrappers in the trash.
It works better for us to let her have at it than trying to hide candy and ration it. I also feel like if I don't want her to have the candy I shouldn't have encouraged her go out and ask for it door to door. I could have planned for her to do a non-candy Halloween activity after all or not let her go to so many houses. It'll be gone soon and we'll be candy free until Christmas probably.
This is us, too. It works out fine. I don't have to get into power struggles about how much they can have or have to put it up/hide it, or make it disappear. It's their candy, and they can regulate it as they wish. It works out for us. We don't get an obscene amount of candy, though, as we only go around to a small amount of houses. When people talk about pounds and pounds of candy, that doesn't apply to us - even with 4 kids. It's really not that much, and they don't seem to gorge on it since they know they can have some whenever they want... until it's gone.
post #22 of 45
do other people's kids get over 100 pieces? cause my kids did and i think it would be insane to let them have access to all that! i offered a substantial amount of cash for candy and threw it in the garbage. some kids this is a good reward, some not. find the right reward and trade! even if only one piece is given a day, i think 1 piece of candy every. single. day for 120 days is a bit much.
post #23 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by organicmidwestmama View Post
do other people's kids get over 100 pieces? cause my kids did and i think it would be insane to let them have access to all that! i offered a substantial amount of cash for candy and threw it in the garbage. some kids this is a good reward, some not. find the right reward and trade! even if only one piece is given a day, i think 1 piece of candy every. single. day for 120 days is a bit much.

Not mine - we went to maybe 20 houses, if that... probably closer to 15 which was more than enough fun for my kids. The houses aren't very close together around here (big lots, long driveways so we out for over an hour), and while some people give out more than one piece of candy, many just hand out a small candy bar or a sucker. So, no, my kids didn't get more than 100 pieces. And we even went to an event before trick or treating but the games they played there gave out mostly non-candy prizes (with a little candy here and there - but not much).

Maybe I'm just too lazy to police candy that is theirs - but they seem to do just fine managing it on their own (and bartering and trading it amongst each other). They eat healthy foods the majority of the time, so a week or two of tons of sugar b/c of Halloween doesn't even faze me. I do remind them to brush their teeth more often, though,
post #24 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Girlo View Post
I forgot about this earlier.....

Another thing I do with leftover Halloween candy is use it for Christmas! We have a Santa House that we use every year. It's a big, wooden house with little doors and windows (24 of them....) that open up to little compartments. It's a type of Advent calendar, except we don't celebrate Advent, so it's a countdown house for us. I use the candy from past holidays that's still there in December to fill those little compartments in this house! It works great to get rid of it and DS loves getting a little treat every day from the house.
This is a cute idea, and reminded me of something I wanted to do. We have tons of leftover candy (ds loves trick or treating, but hates candy. LOL! He eats plain m&m's and plain hershey's milk chocolate and that's it).

We'll make gingerbread houses (maybe even a village... lol) and decorate it with the halloween candy. Woo!
post #25 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post

Maybe I'm just too lazy to police candy that is theirs - but they seem to do just fine managing it on their own (and bartering and trading it amongst each other). They eat healthy foods the majority of the time, so a week or two of tons of sugar b/c of Halloween doesn't even faze me. I do remind them to brush their teeth more often, though,
I'm thinking that once mine are a bit older (my oldest is six), this will be my way of handling it. It almost seems to me like having them binge for a week or two, and eat far too much, would get it over with. Then we could all go back to our normal ways of eating more quickly, instead of dragging the candy out for a month or two like we do now. The reason I've been holding back, and doling it out slowly, is because DD1 has intestinal issues sometimes, when her diet deteriorates, and frankly I don't feel like dealing with her the way she is when her belly is bothering her. But I think in a year or two, maybe she'll be more able to connect the cause and effect of the situation, and that letting her self-regulate will help that happen more quickly. Like if I'm always in control of it, how is she ever going to learn from experience that too much sugar makes her sick?
post #26 of 45

My childhood

Growing up, after trick or treating we'd spread all our candy out together as a family at the table. We'd get to pick 10 pieces, and the rest we'd sell to our parents. 5 cents for the little stuff, 10 cents for the big stuff. And it was a big deal to take our earnings and go buy a toy with it. I don't know how old I was when that started, but I don't remember anything different.

If I remember correctly, even as ambitious teenage kids, I think it would add up to $15 at most. And in my parent's mind, well worth the investment, it was a win-win situation.
post #27 of 45
our kids trade most of their candy to us for a present. i like the 'switch-witch' idea, i'll have to incorporate that for next year.

they each get to keep a small bag (think about the size of a sandwich baggie), mostly chocolate and a couple of lollipops. my oldest has had a lot of dental issues and she's not allowed any 'chewy' candy and even though the other kids could eat it, it's not good for their teeth either so we have a no chewy candy rule. so all the chewy stuff goes in the pile, and then we let them pick a small pile of their favorites to save and they get one piece each day for dessert after a meal until it's gone - usually a few weeks. they know they aren't going to get any candy any other time, so it minimizes the whining.

we did institute this from the very first halloween with our oldest, which has made it easier. it's just what we do. and she loves getting something she can enjoy for a long time vs. extra candy that's a fleeting thrill. since she is into it, the other two are too.
post #28 of 45
Here's the Halloween tradition we started with DS started trick or treating. He gets all dressed up, goes out and does the trick or treat thing, we come home and dump out the loot on the table. He loves looking at it all (he's almost 7 now), and he gets to choose one thing to eat that night.
Then he goes off to bed.
While kids are sleeping, the "Great Pumpkin" comes to visit our house. The Great Pumpkin takes away all the candy and trades it for a fun toy (this year my kids got floor scooters so they can scoot themselves around all over the flooor and get some exercise on cold rainy days like today). Usually the Great Pumpkin leaves a few of the less-toxic seeming candies for the kids to enjoy, a few chocolates or something they really like. The rest of the candy I just dump in the trash. They seem totally cool with this tradition and it works for me too.
post #29 of 45
My kids Toted for about 90 minutes - it was so much fun. About 2/3 or more of the candy disappeared right off the top and the rest is eaten over the next week or so (two or three pieces a day). It's more than I'm comfortable with, but I've decided to add this to the long list of things to let go of.
post #30 of 45
When DD was 4 and younger, we only went around to people we know who wanted to see her all dressed up. It was a social event and DD didn't really know or care about the candy aspect. We'd hand out candy to the few kids who came to our door with any candy she might have gotten and I usually had one bag of something. Seeing the costumes and dressing up was the big deal of Halloween.

Once DD started school, we did trick-or-treating with school friends in a small group. Since she is an only child, I work on social skills and encourage social interactions a lot. There are unintended "side effects" (such as learning about things we'd prefer she didn't), but ultimately those things will come about at some point in her life and we'd rather she learn how to handle situations with us around while she is young. At that point, slowly, t-o-t became a bit more and more about the candy collected.

Our tradition has been we come home and dump the candy out on the living room floor and we all gather around. We go around the circle (DD, DH, me) and chose 1-2 items each (our favorites) until no one is interested in what is left. We then have a two minute bartering session, which is fun, where we attempt to get what we want from someone else. Effectively, her "loot" is divided in quarters and becomes a very reasonable amount.

If anyone comes to our door, we use the "unwanted" pile of candy. Other kids love this stuff, so I don't feel bad at all. The rest is either given to grandpa (he usually only chooses a few pieces) or taken to DH's office or put in the teacher's lunge at DD's school or thrown out. We didn't have any kids come to our door this year and my dad is out of town and DH said they already had a bowl of candy at work and I saw a large bowl in the teacher's lounge, so I pitched it into the trash.

DD can eat a few pieces on Halloween and then can eat whatever she wants until it is gone (for the most part, like not right before dinner or in place of a meal). We did let her eat as much as she wanted twice when she was 5-6 years old (once at Halloween and once at a family movie night). She has learned for herself that too much candy at one time makes her feel AWFUL! At her current age, 9, I would not encourage that again for several reasons, but the two most important to me are 1) Her tolerance is higher now and I don't want to point that out to her; and 2) Binging can more easily become a habit-forming eating pattern now.
post #31 of 45
My kids regularly get over 100 pieces of candy. We don't let them keep it all.

They can eat a fair amount on Halloween night. Then they get to choose 20 pieces to keep.

We buy back the rest from them at 10 cents/piece. This year they made $7 each. I am more than happy to pay it. Dh takes it to work the next day.

When they were younger, the "Sugar Ghost" came for the candy and left a present. That only worked a year or so.
post #32 of 45
ds didn't go out this year - he had a hockey lesson (learn-to-skate) on sunday and was too pooped to go out....

we do have the halloween fairy come to collect all but 1 piece of candy, and she leaves a toy. funny, but ds now thinks that santa claus, the halloween fairy and the easter bunny are all the same fairy, just in different garb.

anyhow, for slightly older kids, one could go trick-or-treating for unicef or collect food for the local food bank...

i didn't give out candy this year, instead giving out little activity booklets and crafty things with stickers from Michaels'Hobby Lobby. the visiting kids loved them! "hey mom! you get STICKERS here!"

so.... we had a candy-free halloween...
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by organicmidwestmama View Post
do other people's kids get over 100 pieces? cause my kids did and i think it would be insane to let them have access to all that! i offered a substantial amount of cash for candy and threw it in the garbage. some kids this is a good reward, some not. find the right reward and trade! even if only one piece is given a day, i think 1 piece of candy every. single. day for 120 days is a bit much.
I didn't count. Dd's pumpkin bucket was about two thirds of the way full I guess. She got a few non-candy items.
The candy was finished off this week.
post #34 of 45
i have tried over the last 16 years not to make any one food forbidden because it becomes an issue. so having a treat (like chocolate) in my house isn't a big deal so halloween has yet to be a big deal with any of my 5 children. they have a few pieces everyday until the "good stuff" is gone and they we throw the rest away. there is no pigging out, no constant thinking about it because it just isn't an issue.

h
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnysandiegan View Post
DD can eat a few pieces on Halloween and then can eat whatever she wants until it is gone (for the most part, like not right before dinner or in place of a meal). We did let her eat as much as she wanted twice when she was 5-6 years old (once at Halloween and once at a family movie night). She has learned for herself that too much candy at one time makes her feel AWFUL! At her current age, 9, I would not encourage that again for several reasons, but the two most important to me are 1) Her tolerance is higher now and I don't want to point that out to her; and 2) Binging can more easily become a habit-forming eating pattern now.
I take back my "...I would not encourage that again..." statement.

Yesterday, I offered DD a choice and she chose eating as much candy as she wanted and writing about it afterwards. (It was more about learning that writing isn't as bad as she has it made out to be in her head.) She ate five pieces and wrote an entire page about the experience in about ten minutes. She noticed exactly how her mood and body changed. She even wrote her own conclusion that she doesn't want to do that again.
post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat View Post
I didn't count. Dd's pumpkin bucket was about two thirds of the way full I guess. She got a few non-candy items.
The candy was finished off this week.
100 pieces was about 2 average pumpkin buckets full, id say. i didnt count either, but my kids are older and take pride in seeing who gets the most.
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnysandiegan View Post
I take back my "...I would not encourage that again..." statement.

Yesterday, I offered DD a choice and she chose eating as much candy as she wanted and writing about it afterwards. (It was more about learning that writing isn't as bad as she has it made out to be in her head.) She ate five pieces and wrote an entire page about the experience in about ten minutes. She noticed exactly how her mood and body changed. She even wrote her own conclusion that she doesn't want to do that again.
That's pretty cool.
post #38 of 45
This was my first year and I didn't have a good plan. DD1 is four and so we didn't go to a lot of houses. I let them binge, even the baby. They ate it ALL- 20 pieces or so--that night. LOL!

I think I'll let them do it that way again and keep it in a candy bowl in the hall until it's gone.

I don't have any control when it comes to candy, so I don't expect them to, either, I guess. It's once a year.
post #39 of 45
They can eat whatever they want on Halloween night, and then they pretty much forget about it. Their buckets have been on top of the fridge since Halloween and they're still almost full. I think I've eaten more than they have!

Last year I dumped all the junky candy after it was ignored for a couple of weeks, then I chopped up all the good chocolates into small pieces and mixed them all up and put them in the freezer to use instead of chocolate chips in things like cookies, brownies, over ice cream, etc.
post #40 of 45
Wow! I am surprised at how much of the stuff you all allow! I just think it's poison; especially the food coloring and artificial flavorings. Yuck!

Dd isn't even 4 yet, but we just trade her for candy from the food co-op -- good chocolate, fruit leathers, etc. I am always thrilled (and so is dd) when someone is handing out something other than candy. My favorite this year was play-doh.

I don't ever see myself telling her she can binge on candy.
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