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what age is appropriate for an ipod or similar? - Page 3

post #41 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post


 

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Originally Posted by zinemama View Post



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Originally Posted by rhiandmoi View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by zinemama View Post

Why does a 6yo need an iPod? What happened to listening to the radio or a CD in the car, or putting a CD in the player at home? I just don't get it.



But what's the difference between a kid having their own CD player and their own mp3 player?




Ha! To be honest, I have no idea what an MP3 player is, even. We have the one computer, no cell phones or other hand-held devices, and an old record/cassette/CD stereo. My kids have a CD player in their room. We tend to buy our CDs second-hand, but the bulk of them we borrow from the library. So I guess I'm just living in a different world from the rest of you! And it's a world where spending $100-$400 on an electronic device for a six-year-old to listen to music just wouldn't happen.


I see where you are coming from (yes, a bit of a different world - said in a nice way), but MP3 players are as cheap as $20, and songs can be found for free -- especially children's songs.  So, it's likely a lot cheaper than the CD player your kids have in their room.  The only difference is the size, making it portable.  Also, something like an ipod shuffle is pretty hard to break, whereas, my kids would probably destroy the cd player tray or top part -- not even intentionally, just after a lot of use.  Just like CD's get scratched and skip - but then, I think my kids are younger than yours and obviously not as gentle and careful (we are working on this, just being honest here). 



Yes, iPods are definitely more durable than CDs.  Do you know how many times I've run an mp3 player through my washer without knowing it was there? lol  My iPod has gone through 5 times minimum in the time I've owned it, dh's player has gone through 11 times, and 7yo dd's has gone through once. LOL  And, 3yo dd has chewed on all 3 players MANY times (mine has teeth marks on the clip, 7yo dd's has chew imprints on one corner, and dh's, well his has been spared so far somehow) and they still play.  The same can't be said for the CDs that child has gotten hold of without my knowing it..................

post #42 of 56

My kids have i-pod shuffles, except the 13 yr. old who has a nano, but he paid for it himself.  My youngest is 4 and he LOVES his i-pod. He has music on it that the older ones don't like, like his abc's, number songs, and entire sesame street album etc.  The girl (only one in the house) has her songs, mostly Miley Cyrus and some songs from My Little Pony.  Then the older of the "littles" is 9 so he has a mix of more mature music such as Toby Keith, and some soundtracks that he likes. Then all of them have religious music, the two younger ones prefer the children's CD's, while the older one likes the more mature CD's so we have those on there. Since each of the kids like different music it is almost impossible to get them to agree on a radio station or CD so when we're in the car it's easier to just let them each have their own music.

 

Plus, for dd it has been a lifesaver because if there is too much outside stimulation then she will either freeze or have a meltdown, so this allows her to focus on the music rather than on the many distracting things around her.

 

So, I love my kids having their i-pods.  To me it's fine.  I was concerned about them being able to work a regular i-pod so we got the shuffle, but we are probably going to be moving them up to the touch at some point, but that will have to wait until b-days so that would be their only gift.

post #43 of 56

My kids got mp3 players at age 4 and 6.... they've been in use for several years, and the kids love them.  They really enjoy being able to listen to their own music and I enjoy not having to listen to what they like.

post #44 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazee View Post

I'm over 40 and I had my own record player to listen to Sean Cassidy on in my room.  I had headphones too.



Yeah, I'm over 40 and we didn't have the money to have a record player, so we all had to share the 8-track in the living room.

 

My objection is not to the device or medium that the music played on... it's the fact that music no longer is part of the household, but something to separate the children from the rest of the family.  We have a different attitude about music... to bring the family together, not to isolate the individual.

post #45 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
Yeah, I'm over 40 and we didn't have the money to have a record player, so we all had to share the 8-track in the living room.
 
My objection is not to the device or medium that the music played on... it's the fact that music no longer is part of the household, but something to separate the children from the rest of the family.  We have a different attitude about music... to bring the family together, not to isolate the individual.


Having an iPod or MP3 player doesn't need to be isolating though, and it doesn't mean you can't enjoy music as a family. Some kids ride the bus to school, and I know that when I did in high school my WalkMan was a life saver, it was an hour ride at 7 AM. Kids who walk to school can enjoy them too, or who just like walking in general. My brother is autistic and his iPod is a must, it helps him cope with the world around him, I don't think I've seen him leave the house without it since he got his first one 4ish years ago. As others have said, you can even buy speakers that you hook them into and the family can share the music on the iPod. I'm sure it doesn't work for all families, but it does for some.

post #46 of 56

I don't understand the thinking that because different people like different kinds of music, that it is isolating.  If different people like reading different types of books and read individually, is that isolating?  If different people like doing different hobbies or crafts, is that isolating?  Music is something that can be shared, or can be enjoyed alone.  And we're all individuals, and it's normal and fine to have different tastes.

post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post

I'm going to be a voice of dissent here. While she could navigate an iPod, what use would she have for it? When would she use it? Why would a 6 year old need one? Does she really listen to that much music? Does she show any interest in yours?

 

My real major concern would be the earbuds, however. It could be that she really would use it. But, can the iPod be set so that she can't set the volume too loud? Hearing loss due to volume too high on earbuds is a major issue for the under 40 crowd these days. I wouldn't want my kids to damage their hearing.


My kids are getting mp3 players for Christmas (not the actual ipods, something cheaper.) My kids are 8 and 13.   I'm definitely getting them headphones that sit just outside of the ear instead of the earbuds that go in the ear. 

post #48 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by supagurl View Post

I have to say that I'm not wild about my kids having much screen time at this age (9 and under) so I would not entertain this idea for our family.  we have a couple I-pods and they do use them to listen to audio books but we've never played games on our iphones and haven't shown the kids that tool either.  I'm a little disturbed by the number of people at restaurants and in public areas who are focusing on a teeny screen in front of them rather than the life all around them.  I realize that these gadgets will be part of life for our children but I'm not worried about them needing to hone these 'screen skills' before puberty. When we have to wait, I use this time to observe what's going on around us, talk with my children or strike up conversations with strangers, think quietly to myself, at restaurants, on planes and waiting areas- these are places where people used to read and I want my kids to learn the skill of waiting or finding a way to use your time without the aid of an electronic device.  Anyone else feel this way?  

 


ME! (Raising hand wildly!) I am also one who believes technology separates families when they could be hanging out together, building relationships and learning how to entertain themselves, or each other, rather than depending on a gadget to entertain them. Music, we share together. We do not do earphones. Well, my husband occasionally, while he is studying. But that is when DS is sleeping.

 

I just wouldn't encourage it in my house. And we don't really care if we're weird I guess.

 

Actually, I feel like it is enough of a challenge to keep DS from wanting to play with our cellphones. I want him to be engaged with us, or pretending, playing outside, etc. No need for the ipod, for sure, for many, many years. Actually that might be one of those, when you have a job and have your money you can buy what you will type of things.

post #49 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazee View Post

I'm over 40 and I had my own record player to listen to Sean Cassidy on in my room.  I had headphones too.



Yeah, I'm over 40 and we didn't have the money to have a record player, so we all had to share the 8-track in the living room.

 

My objection is not to the device or medium that the music played on... it's the fact that music no longer is part of the household, but something to separate the children from the rest of the family.  We have a different attitude about music... to bring the family together, not to isolate the individual.


Sorry, didn't do the multiquote thing, but yeahthat.gif

post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazee View Post

I'm over 40 and I had my own record player to listen to Sean Cassidy on in my room.  I had headphones too.



Yeah, I'm over 40 and we didn't have the money to have a record player, so we all had to share the 8-track in the living room.

 

My objection is not to the device or medium that the music played on... it's the fact that music no longer is part of the household, but something to separate the children from the rest of the family.  We have a different attitude about music... to bring the family together, not to isolate the individual.



Honestly, in our family, the arguments over whose music to listen to isolate the kids from each other more than letting them listen to our own music.  Maybe part of that is because we have a wide range of ages between our 4 children, from 4 to 13.  While I have no problem listening to any of their music, the 13 yr. old gets tired of the little kids songs after a while and the 4 yr. old gets lost in adult music, the other two have their own complaints. 

 

I guess it's one of those things that everyone's situation is different.  Ours, it works better for the kids to have their own ipods.  We still listen to music together, but at times, they all want their own music to listen to.  I think everyone has to do what is right for their family. I also think that I see no harm in it because we don't spend all day together.  I mean all my children have their own interests, so one may be reading while another is outside playing, another is riding her bike, and the other is doing homework.  So it isn't always conducive to everyone listening to music together.  With the ipods the one outside can choose to not listen to music while the one reading can listen to music without disturbing the one doing homework.  I mean it is just a case of what works for my family doesn't work for yours.  But the language used in your post could be taken as insulting to my choices.  I know that isn't what you meant to do, but it did hurt to see you say that you feel my children are being isolated.  As I said, I'm sure that isn't what you meant to say, but that is how it appears by the wording in your post.  

 

post #51 of 56

Well, I'm thinking about the kids in my own family, so obviously I'm coming from a position of personal experience as everyone else.  When I was a kid, my 3 siblings and I had to share the 8 track.  It was certainly a good lesson in sharing, and helped us learn to get along.  In some families, everyone having individual I-pods, IME, is yet another lesson that they can always have it exactly their way, without compromise.  Now, the kids in my family (my generation are having grandkids... I was a late starter... so these are my great nieces and nephews) will sit in a chair with ear buds in and music on loudly even when we're gathered together on Christmas Day.  They shun the silly games my 84 year old aunt has organized that we always enjoyed all these years.  They really *are* isolating themselves (and their parents are not encouraging them participate, but just lets them be).  So, I see it in my family.  Each family is different, but I don't like what I see in my own. I see it with a lot of friends' families as well.  Just explaining where I am coming from.  I don't expect many to agree with me, and that's fine.  What we do works for our family (and btw, we have an only, so that is a factor, too).

post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post

Well, I'm thinking about the kids in my own family, so obviously I'm coming from a position of personal experience as everyone else.  When I was a kid, my 3 siblings and I had to share the 8 track.  It was certainly a good lesson in sharing, and helped us learn to get along.  In some families, everyone having individual I-pods, IME, is yet another lesson that they can always have it exactly their way, without compromise.  Now, the kids in my family (my generation are having grandkids... I was a late starter... so these are my great nieces and nephews) will sit in a chair with ear buds in and music on loudly even when we're gathered together on Christmas Day.  They shun the silly games my 84 year old aunt has organized that we always enjoyed all these years.  They really *are* isolating themselves (and their parents are not encouraging them participate, but just lets them be).  So, I see it in my family.  Each family is different, but I don't like what I see in my own. I see it with a lot of friends' families as well.  Just explaining where I am coming from.  I don't expect many to agree with me, and that's fine.  What we do works for our family (and btw, we have an only, so that is a factor, too).



See now I understand where you are coming from.  In our family, ipods are used for long road trips (over an hour or so) because we will listen to music together but they have the option to not listen to the radio music and just listen to their ipods.  They are used for times when the children are doing their own activities.  They are not used during family activities such as dinner, or game night, or movie night.  The only exception is my dd who has Asperger's, she has trouble with too much outside stimulation, and she doesn't ever leave the house (except for school) without her ipod.  We learned this one day when we were exiting the PX and there were activities going on outside for a fundraiser.  In the middle of the parking lot she froze.  I mean she just froze, she couldn't respond to me, couldn't move, I had to bend down (at the time I was carrying a 2 yr. old and the bags and had not way to carry her too) and actually raise my voice and yell her name.  So from then on, she is allowed to use her ipod in any situation that could be completely overwhelming for her.  It was her psych who thought of that and it works beautifully. OK so I'm getting off topic.  My point is, in families where the children are allowed to isolate themselves, I see that as a parenting issue, not an issue with ipods.  In our family, they are regulated, they are only accessible for changes on my computer, and the children can only get them when I hand them out.  I think you've seen some really bad examples of how to use the technology.  I feel that any technology CAN be good and CAN be bad, it's all in how you decide to use it.  My kids also have DS's, but we are picky about the games we get, I have to see some educational value to them.  They watch TV, but it has to be PBS, HUB (used to be discovery kids), NATGEO, FOOD, etc.  They aren't allowed nickelodeon, disney or any other type of station.  It really just depends on how you use it. 

 

Thank you for explaining your position, I definately understand why you feel that way after hearing what you have seen. 

post #53 of 56


 

Quote:


Excuse my ignorance, but... how does this work?  Does the phone just keep working after it is no longer a phone?  How do you update it/add aps/etc... while it's not a phone.


 

My basic understanding of it (dh knows much more about this stuff) is that the iphone is really just an upgraded ipod touch with phone service.  they both do all the same things & have all the same extras EXCEPT the iphone is a phone too if you pay for the phone service/activation etc.  and an ipod touch can actually be used for email service if you pay for the data plan monthly or it can be everything else except email if you don't want to pay for a data plan.  without a data plan you can still do all apps etc but you would do it while hooked up to your computer, not wirelessly.  and it sounds like the ipod touch can also be used for phone/texting to anyone who has another itouch or iphone when a data plan is paid for.  



 



Just coming at this post from wandering around MDC...I had an iPhone, hated AT&T service, deactivated phone service, and used it as iPod Touch for a while.  I've since given it to a friend to use as an iPod Touch (after doing a full reset since that was the only way to delete my iTunes username/password) and I've gone to an Android phone (love iPhone but not AT&T, but Droid X on Verizon has a HUGE lovely screen!). I need to correct the above bolded quote.

 

You canNOT have an iPhone with just data plan. Phone service & data plan go together. Now what you CAN do is use deactivated iPhone with wifi - whether at home, coffee shop, etc. so you can do email, surf the web, etc. But no over the air cell data plan. NO texting (although there might be a special app that would allow you to text over wifi)/ You download apps from iTunes onto your computer just like you would with an activated iPhone and then plug deactivated iPhone into computer and sync with iTunes just like you did when it was activated.

post #54 of 56

I think it just depends on the child, not the age necessarily. My kids love music and I think you can never go wrong when it comes to music!!

post #55 of 56
I think a 8 year old should have an I pod
post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by laohaire View Post
 

Well, I'm a tightwad and have weird moral issues but it seems that that kind of money is spent on small children regularly in this time and place anyway. I understand the video game systems cost a fortune, for instance. And you can expect years of use from your iPod until the battery dies - I guess my primary objection would be there, built-in-obsolescence. But it's clearly not the concern of the OP, so I would say an iPod must be appropriate for even very young children.

 

My ds has an iTouch that he got for Christmas when he was 6, he just turned 13 last week and it's still working just fine.  The software is a bit obsolete and he can't use most of the new apps, but for music it works just fine.  

 

My kids have always had iThings.  My dh loves the stuff and it gets passed down.  Buy the right cases, put the right protections on it (in app purchases, volume control) and set limits on use :)

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