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Jesus.... From all perspectives - Page 5

post #81 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purple Sage View Post

My children have always gotten that there are diverse views of Christianity.  (My oldest child is 14, youngest is 2, and there are two in between.)  First of all, I have only been a Christian for less than a year and a half now, and before that I was Pagan for nearly 17 years, and DH is not a Christian.  Maybe it's where we live, a very liberal part of a pretty liberal city, and the people we know, but I don't find that Christianity is the dominant worldview around us.  What I find is that the non-religious have the loudest voice, and a lot of this is expressed in terms of 'religious tolerance' for all religions except Christianity, and that is justified by throwing around assumptions that Christians are judging everyone around them and teaching their children that everyone else is going to hell (or that Pagans are worshiping the devil, or things of that nature, which btw no Christian I know does).  I know this because I used to do the exact same thing, and I fit in quite nicely here in my little corner of the world.  I don't feel that I fit in anymore. 

 

The main thing that I see about Jesus, however, is that He either was simply a good "teacher" or did not exist, but certainly not the traditional Christian position on Jesus' divinity.  Many self-professed Christians don't even believe in that, or at least think that it doesn't really matter.  Again, maybe it's just where I'm from and the people I know, but even in the liberal mainline protestant churches I attended as a kid, this is what I noticed.


This is what it's like where I live too.  The non-religious are the largest group, then Christians, most of whom are pretty liberal religiously, then Buddhists who are also liberal in their belief/practice.

 

post #82 of 96

As a pagan, who was once Lutheran, I wouldn't describe Jesus from a pagan stand point, since he isn't pagan. Instead, we address Jesus from my childhood understanding and from a UU perspective. For us, Jesus was a man who lived, who helped people, told some amazing stories, and worked with people to help change the world. Currently, I don't believe in the literal truths of his messages-  I don't believe he actually changed water into wine, but his parables do relate, in many ways, to our current life.

 My children attend church with my Mom, so they the Lutheran perspective, a more liberal view from our UU faith, and my own beliefs.

 

 

 

post #83 of 96

Hey, here is that jewish info I meant earlier http://www.messianicassociation.org/

post #84 of 96


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post




This is what it's like where I live too.  The non-religious are the largest group, then Christians, most of whom are pretty liberal religiously, then Buddhists who are also liberal in their belief/practice.

 


I should have known I'd have to go all the way to Nova Scotia to find my kind of people....;)

 

post #85 of 96


That is something to think about. I think it is better to describe a deity from the perspective of their own religion. From my comment that Christians might not always describe Pagan deities from a Pagan perspective, instead relating them the Christian etc Satan/Devil concept. I am just saying that perhaps that has happened at least a few times in the last hundred years. I mean maybe not yesterday in the liberal town where we all live.

 

What I have learned from this thread is that Jesus has a role in 3 major religions. As a prophet in both Judiaism and Muslim. I feel embarassed to say I didn't know this. And as saviour in Christianity, which I do understand.

 

If we are neither of those religions - which perspective do you chose to describe him to others, to your child?

 

Do Jewish and Muslin parents also go with Christ as Saviour as the best way to describe Jesus to kids? As opposed to their own belief. Because that is what Christians believe, and he is their saviour and they have a whole religion based on him. Or do they just mention all perspectives?

 

I am thinking that might be the case when it comes to Jesus :-)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aeress View Post

As a pagan, who was once Lutheran, I wouldn't describe Jesus from a pagan stand point, since he isn't pagan. Instead, we address Jesus from my childhood understanding and from a UU perspective. For us, Jesus was a man who lived, who helped people, told some amazing stories, and worked with people to help change the world. Currently, I don't believe in the literal truths of his messages-  I don't believe he actually changed water into wine, but his parables do relate, in many ways, to our current life.

 My children attend church with my Mom, so they the Lutheran perspective, a more liberal view from our UU faith, and my own beliefs.

 

 

 



 

post #86 of 96

Yes, I would address Jesus from the Christian perspective, since he is of that religion. I would say something to the effect of, "The Christians believe that Jesus was their Savior." I would explain what Savior means.  I would ask the child what they thought about that, and let the conversation flow from there.

 I don't know how other parents address Jesus to their children, if Christianity isn't their religion, but I think trying to portray the religion as accurately as possible, is important. We have books from many cultures and religions, that others have recommended to us- they have really helped when having conversations with the kids.

 

I don't think you did anything wrong, you addressed the issue as best you could with the information you had.

 

I actually liked your story you told your child but i would pair it with another version as well.

 

post #87 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicolelynn View Post


 

 

Right, it is true that in Catholic and Protestant (I used to be Protestant) theology the Messiah died for our sins to secure eternal salvation. In Orthodox theology the gospel is more about mankind and all of creation being healed from it's fallen state and restored to it's Creator in a mystical union of love. As a Christian mystic I do not hold to any systematic theology, my experience has been  of Jesus but I do not believe in one way to God as mainstream Christianity teaches. I believe as the title of Tolstoy's book is called, "the Kingdom of God is within you". What I was trying to point out is simply that the gospel that came directly out of the mouth of Jesus as it has been recorded (whether or not it is myth I am at peace with) is of the Kingdom of God, not of salvation from damnation or anything else that Pauline Christianity has made it out to be. And how to live in the Kingdom of God is listed in the sermon on the mount, "do not repay evil for evil" "turn the other cheek" "resist not the evil person". If we live the Kingdom of God, and practice non-violence, we will have peace. The gospel of non-violence fosters change, as demonstrated by Martin Luther King Jr and Ghandi (Ghandi was influenced by Tolstoy, our modern Christian mystic).

 

I just feel there is a fourth "Christian" view of Jesus (after Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant) that is mysticism, more closely related to Orthodoxy than the other two..and also close to UU and Buddhism. Yeah, Jesus might be God, and He might be myth but either way His teachings have mystical power that I have personally witnessed.
 

 


Have you ever read any Cynthia Bourgealt ? I think you would really enjoy her writings.
post #88 of 96
It's kind of an interesting question, isn't it? Who owns the Jesus story, I mean? I'm not quite sure how I feel about this idea of, when answering children's questions about Jesus, defaulting to some sort of telling of the Christian narrative.
post #89 of 96
I, personally, as a secular/agnostic/atheist parent, explain Jesus from as many different perspectives as I can - primarily the Christian view when discussion holidays like Easter and Christmas (and we've talked about various different Christian views on who Jesus was and what the things he's reported to have said mean), but we also talk about how he is considered a prophet in Islam, that he was Jewish by birth, etc. I also talk about him from my secular/historic perspective. I don't think any one person/group/tradition/religion "owns," the story, but I think it's important to talk about what people believe from their perspective.
post #90 of 96

I haven't, scottishmommy...but I will put her on my list of "to read"

post #91 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicolelynn View Post

I haven't, scottishmommy...but I will put her on my list of "to read"


Might I suggest "wisdom Jesus" first. I'm reading "the Meaning of Mary Magdalene" now and it's also very good.
http://www.amazon.com/Wisdom-Jesus-Transforming-Mind-Perspective/dp/1590305809/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_2
post #92 of 96
I am not one to know facts as I agree with alot of what nicolelynn said about Jesus mysticism. I really don't care what facts there are about Jesus being real. I actually teach my kids alot about Jesus visiting among the native americans. There is many traditional stories of a white god coming and I like to tell my kids about Jesus that way.
post #93 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post

It's kind of an interesting question, isn't it? Who owns the Jesus story, I mean? I'm not quite sure how I feel about this idea of, when answering children's questions about Jesus, defaulting to some sort of telling of the Christian narrative.

I told my kids about him without using any of the xtian rhetoric. I tell them he was a teacher who traveled around with his own quorum so that he could speak in any temple according to Jewish laws of the time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minyan
post #94 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by flightgoddess View Post

I remember reading a news article about a Jewish sect that DID believe Jesus was the messiah, sorry I don't recall their name.


Then, by definition, they wouldn't be Jews.  They may identify with cultural aspects of Judaism but the single thing that separates Jews and Christians is that Christians believe that Jesus was the Messiah.  

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebirdmama1 View Post

I am not one to know facts as I agree with alot of what nicolelynn said about Jesus mysticism. I really don't care what facts there are about Jesus being real. I actually teach my kids alot about Jesus visiting among the native americans. There is many traditional stories of a white god coming and I like to tell my kids about Jesus that way.


huh?

post #95 of 96
There is a great book called He Walked the Americas by L Taylor Hansen. It will tell you about some great stories of a white prophet who visited among traditional people in South and Central America, mayans, through mexico, and all of north america. As I said before I am not looking for proof of this, but it is what I choose to believe and this thread is about sharing what our perspective on Jesus is.
post #96 of 96

My perspective:  Jesus Christ was more than likely an historical figure.  Probably more a rubble rouser than religious figure.  He was a rebel that the common people related to.  The brilliance if all this is that he was kept alive in stories, parables, paintings.  People ate it up.  And they continue to do so.  My perspective only.  Not alleging truth or falsity of the story.


Edited by CatsCradle - 4/26/11 at 7:30am
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