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Hospital vs. Home for 1st time moms - Page 4

post #61 of 107


That definitely sounds like a better hospital situation than most women have, but in that case, I would still lean towards birthing at home. Often, in a midwife-attended hospital birth, you find yourself fighting hospital policies and protocols that the midwife isn't in favor of but doesn't have the authority to over-rule, such as time limits. Many hospitals also don't permit waterbirths, which would be a deal breaker for me. And again, it's much easier to achieve a physiological, normal birth when you're in your own home environment. Birth is an incredibly psychological experience and it progresses much easier when you feel safe. We're just mammals, after all. If you put a cat or a horse or a deer into an unsafe environment, their labor will stall. We're just the same.

As far as what your particular midwife can do at home -- ask her. Sit down and talk with her about protocols for various emergency situations. I'd also ask her why she prefers homebirth, and what hospital protocols she disagrees with.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Metis View Post

I am in the same position as the OP, but with a bit more time to decide (EDD in July). I have been reading about homebirth for years now and I am well aware of the benefits, but I have some concerns to overcome. I'd love to see some discussion about what specific forms of treatment the homebirth skeptics feel is not available at home. Particularly for the baby. I know oxygen is available, but can a midwife intubate a newborn? Provide CPAP? I don't think so but I'm not sure.

 

In my case, I have a homebirth midwife (CNM) who will also deliver in the hospital if you prefer (although she strongly favors homebirth). Her orientation is completely toward physiological birth, so I have no fears of excess intervention in the hospital. I also don't have any strong fears or anxieties about being in the hospital (although home is always nicer for sure.) I guess in part, I'm questioning whether I can justify a homebirth since I have access to a "safe" hospital birth.

 

I'm not making an argument here, just wanting to hear what others think. Thanks for the helpful thread, OP.

post #62 of 107

Your plans sound very exciting, and having Valley only 10 minutes away is pretty safe in case anything happens. I'm not brave enough to do the home birth thing, due to my job and personality I guess, but I really admire those who choose this route in uncomplicated pregnancies. I know several people who chose home births w/ great success, but we're in Seattle after all. Best wishes to you!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeattleMolly View Post

Pregnant@40-

Thanks for the reply. I'm in South Seattle, so Valley Medical in Renton is 10 minutes away. It was touring this hospital that really turned me off, even though it  is gorgeous and very homey. It is rather large, but allows a midwifery model and is close to home. I've been seeing the nurse midwives from Valley, and they are pretty great, and have a 17% c-section rate.  


After talking to my husband last night, we decided that home birth is our frontrunner right now, as long as we can transfer to Valley (since it's so close and in network). Seattle Home Maternity was impressive, but they are the group that told me about the 25% transfer rate for 1st time moms. I'm going to check some other midwives out, and in the meantime, still go to my appointment next week at the nurse midwife clinic.

 

post #63 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by goinggreengirl View Post


I planned a homebirth (midwives are not yet licensed for hospital births so choosing a midwife was choosing a homebirth here.) We ended up transferring after 60 hours of labor for exhaustion. I ended up with an epidural and pitocin (wanted to avoid both which is why I chose to stay home). It took a little while to come to terms with the birth, but I do not regret trying for a homebirth for my first baby. I will plan one for my second child as well.



 



My midwife stayed with me at the hospital as labor support. And, even if the hospital is not midwife friendly, and your midwife comes with you, you could just say she is labor support.



 



Good luck deciding. I know what a hard decision it is!






Whoa. Could have written the exact same response. No regrets for me either. Especially as I would have had to transfer afterward anyways (retained placenta).
post #64 of 107

Mamametis, have you asked the MW why she favours homebirth?  It might be because she finds it much harder to do her job in hospital.  Or because she has to fight and fight the interventions she knows her ladies don't want.  It's worth having a conversation about it with her.

 

Ditto the intubation query.  Discuss the SPECIFIC situations you feel CPAP or intubation would be necessary.  My MW would have transferred me long before a baby who was going to be born needing that sort of help arrived.  She is very careful during the labour, she watches both mother and babe carefully, she observes very very astutely.  For example my labour was very stop-start prodomal then suddenly very active, at one point, when i was already fully dilated, DD's heartrate seemed very high.  It was reactive and came down with the contraction ending, but it was higher than she would have expected to see.  Was it tachycardia or an acceleration?  She asked herself this question, she observed that i was acting like a woman beginning the foetal expulsion reflex (which was NOTHING like the 2nd stage with DD1, with DD2 it was like throwing up out of my vagina, i had no control, i was merely observing my body, i couldn't even catch my breath and my body utterly took over, panting at the right moments and all!) and since when i had asked her to do a VE (which she doesn't require, she could tell i was fully from other signs) she had used the opportunity to guage how big DD's head was and how much room i had and she knew i had plenty of room.  So she decided it would be ok - i had a lot of room and pushing was likely to be very short given the expulsive reflex is very effective that way.  She was right.  DD was out in 6 minutes, apgars 10, 10, 10, and with a true knot in her cord.  The knot pulled tight as i held her, so it's likely it was tightening as she descended (and she was only at spines 6mins before birth, she did the "risky" bit of the descent in a huge hurry) which was causing her accelerated heartrate.  But my MW's experience meant she was able to get a good, full picture of it all.  If the heart rate had been having such fast accelerations early in labour she would have advised transfer.  Had the baby been bigger or my pelvis been smaller she would have called an ambulance.  As it was she had everything needed for an emergency set up when DD was born, we just didn't need any of it.  She had a student there observing and the student was amazed at the subtlety of my MW's observations, in hospital they rely on intermittent observations and/or a machine to warn them of such things and a doctor to save them if it's all gone too far before someone find time can read what the machine is saying.  The formula's which "keep you safe" in a hospital are set up to fight fires caused by a lack of continuous one-to-one observation by an experienced attendant.  Yes, some babies will be born needing help, but it's very rare that there is NO indication of that outcome before the moment of birth.

 

I would turn the question on its head.  Not can you justify a homebirth when you could have a safe hospital birth, but can you legitimise a hospital birth when you can have a safe homebirth.  Hospital birth is NOT safer.  Homebirth with a qualified MW is as safe in terms of mortality and safer in terms of morbidity because the interventions in hospital often result in injury that would have been avoided if the intervention had.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by *MamaJen* View Post


That definitely sounds like a better hospital situation than most women have, but in that case, I would still lean towards birthing at home. Often, in a midwife-attended hospital birth, you find yourself fighting hospital policies and protocols that the midwife isn't in favor of but doesn't have the authority to over-rule, such as time limits. Many hospitals also don't permit waterbirths, which would be a deal breaker for me. And again, it's much easier to achieve a physiological, normal birth when you're in your own home environment. Birth is an incredibly psychological experience and it progresses much easier when you feel safe. We're just mammals, after all. If you put a cat or a horse or a deer into an unsafe environment, their labor will stall. We're just the same.

As far as what your particular midwife can do at home -- ask her. Sit down and talk with her about protocols for various emergency situations. I'd also ask her why she prefers homebirth, and what hospital protocols she disagrees with.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Metis View Post

I am in the same position as the OP, but with a bit more time to decide (EDD in July). I have been reading about homebirth for years now and I am well aware of the benefits, but I have some concerns to overcome. I'd love to see some discussion about what specific forms of treatment the homebirth skeptics feel is not available at home. Particularly for the baby. I know oxygen is available, but can a midwife intubate a newborn? Provide CPAP? I don't think so but I'm not sure.

 

In my case, I have a homebirth midwife (CNM) who will also deliver in the hospital if you prefer (although she strongly favors homebirth). Her orientation is completely toward physiological birth, so I have no fears of excess intervention in the hospital. I also don't have any strong fears or anxieties about being in the hospital (although home is always nicer for sure.) I guess in part, I'm questioning whether I can justify a homebirth since I have access to a "safe" hospital birth.

 

I'm not making an argument here, just wanting to hear what others think. Thanks for the helpful thread, OP.

post #65 of 107


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by the janet View Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by Xantho View Post

I find it interesting when folks say a free standing birth center is the same as a homebirth.  IMO, it is similar, but not completely the same.  


I agree...it's not the same. You experience a disruption by leaving your comfort zone at home, getting in a car, then having to recreate that environment of comfort and safety all over again.

 

But it's still closer to the experience of having a home birth than having a hospital birth.

Just another voice of agreement.

I think they are "the same" in terms of medical safety. (Unless of course birthing at the BC would leave you significantly closer to a hospital in case of the need for transfer) - but aside from that, exactly the same.

 

Personally once I found that out, I totally ruled out BC as an option (I actually have several hospitals close by, one of which is actually fantastic & where I had my DS.) Of course, a BC could also offer other nice perks for some, such as big jetted jacuzzi tubs (yeah, you can get a birth tub, but hard to get one with jets), & not having to buy a birth kit & set up the tub yourself. I'd also imagine they'd take care of the birth cert for you - my hospital did - ZERO effort on my part, whereas for my HB, I have to deal with the Maryland state dept of health myself, which I've read can sometimes be a headache.

 

But all minor stuff & certainly nothing anywhere near compelling enough for me to leave the comfort of "my turf." Plus, with a BC, you get whatever MW & nurse are on call, whereas I know MY MW and her asst - no gamble that I'll be stuck with my least fav from a group.

post #66 of 107
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mama Metis View Post

I guess in part, I'm questioning whether I can justify a homebirth since I have access to a "safe" hospital birth.

 

I think you've already received excellent answers from MamaJen & GoBecGo, but just wanted to add my thoughts.

 

I think that's a very good question & I have to say I felt the same way. The MWs & nurses at the hospital where I had my DS were really fantastic! Really great. So part of me has thought, "Well, I probably should go there just in case." I mean, if you're faced with an atrocious hospital with a 50% CS rate, 25% episiotomy rate, 90% epidural rate for vaginal births, mandatory eCFM, no hydrotherapy options, "nothing by mouth" etc. etc. etc. - then the choice is REALLY obvious - I would UC before I'd birth in a place like that!

 

First though - what are post-partum experiences like at this great hospital? Mercy in Baltimore city is widely regarded as the best for natural birth - they even allow water births! But I've heard TONS of stories on how awful PP care is. Even a friend of mine who's DH is a physician with privileges there said she still had a terrible time PP. So consider that too. Even at my awesome hospital, the lactation consults were ATROCIOUS - really awful. I have no doubt I would have been better off never meeting with them & being left to my own devices with the internet & library books.

 

For me though, I accidentally did ALL my laboring at home! Less than 5 hours from the first, "oh, huh, that was finally a contraction." To "AAHH! I really want to push, we gotta go!" I don't know if it would have been that fast & manageable if I'd been in the hospital. I personally DID have a lot of anxiety about birthing in a hospital and I"m fairly confident it would NOT have been so fast & smooth being in foreign territory. I also have huge issues with feeling "Bossed around" so the policies like being on CFM for 15 min out of ever hour, having a hep-lock, etc. would like have irritated me, ticked me off, and therefore not been too productive.

 

Plus, there is the fact that with DS birth, my first, having been so fast, I might accidentally have #2 at home anyway - even if I'd planned a hospital birth! So better to have a MW who knows me & is willing to come out when I say I've been laboring for only 45 minutes.

 

I'm lucky that I won't be hesitant to transfer since I know this hospital will be friendly & not hostile. (Plus, the CNMs there know my MW & are friendly with her! & I've seen them a few times to establish care & ease a transfer.) So I think I have the best of both worlds in this case. I just think the "what ifs" of HB for me are so slim that I'm willing to chance it. -- Yes, I do know it's possible for some unforeseen complications to arise that can't be dealt with adequately at home that could be better managed in hospital. BUT - even with a good hospital, the same applies, There's a possibility of hospital acquired infections, mistakes where I'm given the wrong drugs (happens ALL.THE.TIME)

 

So I guess all this is to say that I really don't feel that even a great hospital is all that much better on the risk side of the equation.

post #67 of 107

Thanks everyone for the thoughtful replies. OP, I hope I didn't hijack. redface.gif

 

It was nice to hear that a couple of you had no regrets in planning a homebirth even after a transfer was needed. I think this was one thing I needed to hear.

 

MamaJen, it's true that I need to take into account the added safety of a normal labor progression, which can best be acheived at home.

 

GoBecGo, you're totally right that it's unlikely to have a baby who suddenly needs lots of support without a lot of warning ahead of time. This was also something I needed to remember.

 

MegBoz, you make a good point about postpartum care. The hospital I would go to is definitely not some kind of wonderland, it's just that they basically let my midwife run the show for her own clients, and she releases you when you're ready. However, it's hard to say what the situation will be with nurses, lactation consultants, etc. I guess I have been looking at these concerns as just nuisances, in contrast to my concerns about the baby's safety. 

 

I do realize what a low-liklihood event it would be to need an emergency transfer for the baby, but for whatever reason, this is the precise fear I'm always coming back to. I do need to talk to my mw, I know that will help. It's an odd experience for me to feel this way because I have been a strong advocate for homebirth for a long time now. Now that I'm actually pg, these latent fears are coming to the surface.

 

Can I blame hormones? shy.gif

 

post #68 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeattleMolly View Post

Thanks to you all for all of your input and thoughtfulness! This is a big decision and you helped in my education around home birth. I've also checked out the Home Birth threads and they've also been helpful. Philisophically, I'm probably not as far on the homebirth side of things as people are here on the boards, but I believe that it is necessary for me to listen to all stories before I make a decision.


OP, I hear you on this.  I had never heard of homebirth until I stumbled across MDC forums last fall, and while I now believe it is a great birth choice for many women, it still doesn't really feel right for me.  (I felt anxious about the transfer process, and I felt like I wouldn't be able to relax at home as we live in a rowhouse with thin walls...ultimately I had a very peaceful waterbirth at a NCB friendly hospital with a great doula).  There are plenty of others who have provided you with tons of data about how homebirth is a safe option, and tons of other who can provide great homebirth stories.  I think its great to gather data and do research.  But at the end of the day, you and your partner need to make the choice that feels right for you, and where you feel most at peace, whether that be at home, a birth center, or a hospital.  Best wishes for a smooth pregnancy and a peaceful birth.

post #69 of 107

I am a VBAC, so when I called the local hospital and found out all the "requirements", I started to cry.   Nothing by mouth (and I run hypoglycemic so that won't work), mandatory CFM (so no movement), heplock, etc.  It just seemed like too many obstacles.

 

You have to remember that even in an emergency c-section, it takes time to set up an OR and get the personnel in there.  The standard for "decision to incision" is 30 minutes.  My mom's group had a tour with the local fire department and I asked them about the timelines.  Once they have the call, they must be out of the fire station in 1.5 minutes.  The ride time to my place (they knew what subdivision I am in) is 4 minutes.  From my house to the hospital is 7 minutes.  If we called 911, we could then have them get an OR ready for when I get there and I will probably get there before the OR is even ready!  So, being in a hospital really does not "help" me get quicker access to care.  Sure, it will be scary as hell.  But you know what, having a midwife say "you need a c-section" when her c-section rate is about 5% is preferable to me.  If she says it, I know she means it.

 

Anyway, just another way of looking at it.....

post #70 of 107

For me, I cannot imagine getting into a car after 1st stage of labor.  I also couldn't imagine having to put DS in a car seat immediately after having him.  My thoughts on birthing somewhere other than home....  smells are different, people I don't know there (other women's family members, etc.), not my comfort zone.  I agree with the idea if you are not comfortable in your current space to go to a birth center.  We had DS in a OLD cottage that was pretty run down (looking back).  I wasn't completely comfortable with our home at that time but I knew my things were there, my scents, etc.... 

 

I have had a few women say that a birth center is the same as home and those conversations really didn't end up that well.  They didn't "get it". 

 

Everyone does what is best for themselves. 

post #71 of 107

I think if you study up on stages of labor and have an idea what to expect you could have a very successful homebirth with your first. 

 

I gave birth to my first in the hospital with an epidural and pitocin which was recommended by the nurses since I was taking too long. I really wasn't. It's perfectly normal to take longer to go through labor with a first baby. They simply said it will get it done with faster and didn't tell me there were any potential side-effects. It was really not at all what I'd expected and it sucked. I was also given an episiotomy that I am sure I didn't need. And that took over a year to stop being painful when DTD.

 

I planned an unassisted homebirth with my second but I ended up living with my in-laws at the end of the pregnancy so it didn't happen sadly and I ended up having a very traumatic hospital birth experience but the labor and most of the pushing went great because in Romania they just shove you off in a room with a bunch of other laboring moms and leave you to do your thing until the end. That part was good. It was the end and the horrible hospital care baby and I received after that sucked.

 

I far preferred the natural birth over the epidural/pitocin birth. 

 

I know I would have been able to do the birth myself without an issue at home as the doctor didn't even do anything til the very end and every she did do messed things up.

 

So, if it were me and I could go back, I would give birth at home every time unless there is a very particular complication that forces you to be in a hospital. 

Hospitals just suck. It feels like you lose all control and they take over.

 

I'd look for a homebirth midwife that is somewhat hands-off but very supportive and then I would study up on labor and delivery like crazy so you could feel confident about it. If you were at all comfortable with it I'd even recommend unassisted birth of a first baby.

 

Hope that helps.


Edited by dayiscoming2006 - 12/3/10 at 12:33pm
post #72 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Metis View Post
Can I blame hormones? shy.gif

 


LOL, yes, absolutely!

The most important thing is to birth where you feel safe - and where you feel most comfortable. For me, the more I read, the more anxiety I had about a hospital. I've never really had any significant anxiety about HB - even prior to having DS (I was just misinformed on my MW options). Sure, I realize there are risks, it would be silly to say I have "ZERO" anxiety, but it's never been significant and it's always felt right for me.

 

But if if doesn't feel right for you, and the hospital DOES make you feel safe, secure, cared-for, etc. then that is where you need to be. Nothing wrong with that given it IS a decent hospital. (of course, I'd definitely recommend a doula in that case.)

 

Yeah, I didn't think about the PP care that much myself, but it really does effect your baby's health too. Some things are just a nuisance, such as if they aren't prompt in getting your paperwork for you to checkout. But my friend made it sound like the problems were major & actually potentially a threat to her baby's health! We didn't get into details, this was over email & we're not super close, so I didn't want to pry, but that's my impression based on her statements.

 

& obviously I can see how bad PP care can be a threat to your baby. I've heard all kinds of nutty horror stories such as mandatory blood sugar tests for bigger babies & mandatory formula if their blood sugar is low (hello - killing BFing!), mandatory nursery time. That latter is particularly unlikely at a good- pro-NCB hospital. But certainly a risk to consider & factor into the equation.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Climbergirl View Post
But you know what, having a midwife say "you need a c-section" when her c-section rate is about 5% is preferable to me.  If she says it, I know she means it.

This is another excellent point! Yes, so true. I'm so much less stressed this time around - I don't think I'll even have a formally written birth plan for my MW & her asst! (Although I will have one just in case of transfer.)

 

There is such a deeper level of trust here! I won't wonder if my birth is just being "pushed" & rushed along for convenience or if something is recommended because someone is concerned about her liability risk. My MW doesn't practice defensively (I believe she doesn't even has any sort of malpractice insurance.) I can relax, trust her, know that she & her asst know me, know they know my wishes, and I can know, with confidence, that if she recommends something I don't really want (transfer, CS, pushing in another position, etc.) it's because it really & truly is the best thing. That is a huge weight off my shoulders! It hadn't really hit me just how significant this is until I read Climbergirl's statement above.

post #73 of 107

I thought the same way with my first baby, and did have a hospital birth.  I went on to have both birth center and homebirths with later children.  I was amazed during my out-of-hospital births by how much better the care was for my baby and me.  At the hospital, I went hours without anyone even coming into the room.  Monitoring was sporatic and was done by machine.  Once they put the monitor on, they would tell me they'd be "right back" and not return until my husband went and begged them to come back, often over an hour later.  We eventually started taking the monitor off after the 20 minutes we had agreed to.  No one cared or mentioned it.

 

With my out-of-hospital births, my caregivers actually cared for me!  My baby was monitored by hand, far more frequently.  My progress and I were both closely observed, and assessed regularly.  Someone was with me every minute, usually 2 or 3 people, but I also had the option of asking for privacy if I wanted.  That was never an option at the hospital.  The staff was so busy, they came in my room when they could spare a minute and my needs/desires had nothing to do with it. 

 

I've since heard the arguement that choosing a homebirth for a first baby is arguably even more important than making that choice for subsequent children, and can see the logic.  Why?  Because the first birth does tend to be a bit longer and being in a hospital for a longer time increases the odds of unnecessary interventions which can lead to an unnecessary c-section.  Avoiding that first c-section can make an enormous difference in the course of someone's reproductive life.  I still shudder to realize how close I came to a c-section with my first baby, and how much smoother things would have gone had I avoided going to the hospital in the first place.  If any other OB in the practice had been on-call that day, I have no doubt I would have had a c-section - a couple of them told me that themselves. 

post #74 of 107
Quote:

Originally Posted by Climbergirl View Post


You have to remember that even in an emergency c-section, it takes time to set up an OR and get the personnel in there.  The standard for "decision to incision" is 30 minutes.



Yes, that info was really helpful to me when I was deciding whether or not to birth out-of-hospital.

post #75 of 107

I had number one (and number two!) at home, after having many of the same feelings.  I started seeing my MW at 20 weeks (kept shadow care with the OB during the first in case I *did* have to transfer) and had the best birth experience at home, in my own bedroom.

post #76 of 107

I chose to do hospital birth for my first-born (less than 4 months ago!) because I felt that as much as I read and studied and questioned, I really had no idea what birth would be like - so the hospital was my security blanket. Now that I do know, I absolutely plan to choose home birth next time. My hospital experience wasn't bad, but it wasn't anything like what I imagine birth could be in your own familiar, relaxed environment. They will turn it into a clinical, streamlined (in their way) situation - it's what they're programmed for, and they don't do anything else. (One of the biggest issues for me was that I wanted to wear my own clothes, and they wouldn't let me - I had to change into a gown. Simple and silly, perhaps, but it was such an important thing for my own personal comfort - a small comfort that would have meant a lot to me - and it was a no because it didn't fit into their regular operation.) Also, even though the nurses in the birth room were great, and my midwife was there with me, the ward I went to afterward was awful - crowded, loud, hot, and one busy impersonal nurse for 4-8 new moms and babies - I couldn't wait to get out of there and get home!

 

Ultimately though, the best advice I've had and will give as a mother - do what feels most right for you - you won't regret it. :)  Best wishes for your birth!

post #77 of 107

I chose to have a homebirth with my first after doing a lot of research. I was determined that my first birthing experience be a positive one, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. As a healthy woman with a low risk pregnancy, I recognized I was just as physically safe at home, and my other needs were more likely to be met. I chose a midwife I trusted and never looked back.

 

A lot of people asked me why I didn't have my first baby in the hospital, "just in case I couldn't have a vaginal birth", but I preferred to assume that I could rather than assume that I couldn't.

 

Our second homebirth is planned for the spring.

post #78 of 107

I had my first at home.  It wasn't a decision I took lightly as I live over an hour away from a hospital that handles births.  Finding this site was very helpful to me:

http://www.homebirth.org.uk/firstbaby.htm

Don't let your birth attendant (if you choose one) decide for you.  If you choose one, search until you find the right fit.  I cannot stress this enough.  If your attendant is uncomfortable with homebirth, your chances of transfer are higher.  Do some soul searching on the reasons why you are uncomfortable with homebirth.  If after research and reflection, you discover you still have reservations, then explore your other options.

Do the research, but follow your heart.  Don't let a statistic decide for you.  And fear based decisions--live without them!  Most of all, remember that YOU know what's best for you and for your baby!

Best of luck!

post #79 of 107

I had double footling breech twins and serious pre-eclampsia - not a midwife nor Ob on the planet would knowingly allow that natural birth to happen. It was a "planned" c-section. When I say planned, I mean when I went to my OB the Monday before they were born, he told me point plank that I was starting to go into the early stages of kidney failure and if I wanted we could drive over to the hospital and have them right then and there. I said no way, I'm not ready, so we negotiated. He told me Thursday was the latest this pregnancy was going and I was to be monitored daily to make sure nothing changed. He tired to get me to go in Tuesday, but I just wasn't quite there and everything was stable plus I was supposed to teach a self defense class that Wednesday night and they don't let you do that after surgery in the morning. I'm glad we waited because I really needed that time to mourn the loss of the natural birth we had planned, as I had a textbook pregnancy until two weeks before that. He was really cool and even did a quick ultrasound before the C-section to triple check that the lower twin hadn't turned - he hadn't. c section took 27 minutes from rolling me in to rolling into recovery. I was blessed to have him and would go back for other pregnancies. the hospital staff were also amazing. It's a really small rural hospital and they treat their patients really well. All the rooms are private and the babies automatically room in unless you ask for them to be out. And each room has it's own jacuzzi - which i didn't get to use. greensad.gif

post #80 of 107

Well, I just had to add my two cents as I did briefly consider a homebirth with my first...almost in a wistful "wouldn't that be great?" way - and when my DH seemed freaked out by the mention I thought that being educated and strong in a hospital setting would be my best bet. I did EVERYTHING I could think of to prepare for the birth - Hypnobirthing, a great one page birth plan that the staff asked us if they could use as a "how to" example in their classes, signs for the door, informed cooperative OB re: our plan and goals. That said - with all my research - you CAN'T prepare for exactly how your birth will go - because there is simply NO way of knowing...I NEVER dreamed that I would do exactly as I'd planned - have a completely unmedicated labor and stay strong in all my wishes...to have the "residents on call" at our teaching hospital - MISS that my son was frank breech until I was pushing. I ended up with an emergency cesarean and a "T" incision - and was unconscious when my son entered the world. I say this NOT to put negativity out there - only to say that TRULY the reason for my cesarean was staff that LITERALLY did NOT know how to deliver a breech baby vaginally - and were in a setting where it was protocol not to. It changed my story - it changed my future - I'm 28+ weeks pregnant now and TOTALLY planning a homebirth. There was NO other option for me this time as I simply don't trust hospital care unless there's a need - unless something's wrong - and if you know your research - a frank breech baby and Mom who've made it to fully dilated and pushing - are NOT a reason for an emergency cesarean. To put it in perspective as well - I'm VERY strong minded and what they told us in the moment was "We know this is the opposite of what you wanted - but none of that matters now - THE BABY'S IN DANGER AND WE HAVE TO GET HIM OUT - NOW." They had no signed consent form - and truly - there never was informed consent - b/c I would have chosen 200% to continue to push my baby out. My point is that the truth is you CAN'T control you labor or birth - truly - there's no way of knowing how the story will play out. I will always have to wonder how easily my son might have been born beautifully were a midwife waiting to watch him enter the world instead of the terrified residents I had. What you CAN DO )here's the positive part) is give yourself the BEST ODDS of having a peaceful, natural, beautiful birth if that's what your shooting for!! In a perfect world I'd deliver in a home-like peaceful supportive environment with immediate access to medical care if necessary - but with no medical involvement unless necessary. The truth is I'm MORE scared about possibilities in a hospital environment than I am risks of being at home and having to transfer. Another consideration is that my DS, now 5 years old had a shocking, glaring, opposite-of-what-I tried desperately for type of birth. This time around he has the chance to be part of a beautiful birth. That's the best I can do for him now - for his story. It doesn't heal my heart - but it would help - a little. ♥ Again - my point is really to say that ANY BIRTH CHOICE has risks and different possible hurdles - you REALLY have to search your heart for your OWN BEST CHOICE - and realize that no matter what - you will probably be nervous - and the truth is that things may not go perfectly - but if you prepare well - and choose well - odds are GOOD that you overall you will have a GREAT BIRTH! ♥ Here's wishing us all the right informed choices and a BEAUTIFUL BIRTH

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