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Baby 1 month old, still no milk. Suggestions? Giving up.

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I am still on this breastfeeding journey with my daughter.  Her labor was induced and the hospital staff was not very supportive of breastfeeding from the start (this is her first child and the staff convinced her that she needed to give him formula).  Anyway, she is been a real trooper, very dedicated to breastfeeding:  She took fenugreek & blessed thistle, then Reglan and has been pumping with a good pump (first a single pump, now on a double pump) round the clock all these weeks.  The milk increased a little with the Reglan, but as soon as she finished the prescription, it trickled back down to almost nothing.  She has asked her doctor who checked her thyroid.  Her thryroid was slightly low but  "nothing to worry about."  She is at a loss and ready to give up.  I know there must be a reason for this!  Any suggestions?

post #2 of 25

Does baby latch on?  Does she ever feed at the breast?  If baby will latch, would she be interested in feeding with a tube at the breast?  See http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=128:inserting-a-lactation-aid&catid=6:video-clips&Itemid=13  Dr. Jack Newman explains why this is such a great way to supplement during the video (if I remember correctly).

 

Domperidone has also been shown to help to increase milk supply.

 

Anemia and thyroid are worth looking into with low milk supply.

 

And it helps to remember that some women just do not respond to the pump, but can nurse their babies just fine.

 

Have they been seen by an IBCLC?  Baby checked for tongue-tie?

 

Sorry about the randomness of these thoughts - I wanted to reply quickly while my baby sleeps!

post #3 of 25

I'm so sorry :(  I was also induced early and pumped for a half h our ever 2 hours. The Lactation nurse told me most women will give up by 6 weeks? It was a certain time frame anyway. I cried, I was very depressed. They also gave baby formula and she never latched. They tried everything on me. Fake nipples, expressing. I was getting maybe an ounce a day of milk so certainly she needed formula also. but it was a very depressing situation that had me a ball of tears.

 

Just let her know it's not her fault and it doesn't make her a bad mommy. Sometimes these things just don't happen. Her baby will still be healthy and just fine and ignore anyone who might piss and moan about it (doubt anyone will).

 

Just remember her body wasn't ready to have the baby. It is OK!! Do not tear herself up over this. She has a beautiful baby and that's all that counts right now!

 

And only she can decide when she has given up, so let her try as long as she likes. I tried forever and nothing happened

post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 

Yes, she uses a feeding tube and he does latch, but not so much now that her milk has dwindled again.  She has seen her hospital's IBCLC (who is very busy and not a lot of help) and I just made contact with another IBCLC in a town about 1 hour from her.  I hope they can help, although I see from another poster than it just might not ever happen....because she was induced prematurely?  (Ooooo that makes me upset!)

post #5 of 25

If the LC is no help try going to a LLL meeting or calling a leader for ideas.

post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lydiah View Post

If the LC is no help try going to a LLL meeting or calling a leader for ideas.



Here is the Le Leche League locator page:

 

http://www.llli.org/Webindex.html

 

you can obtain an answer online from LLL also:

 

http://www.llli.org/help_form

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the LLL suggestions.  Actually, that was our first resource.  The local LLL consultant came over right away to help and was wonderful.  However, she has reached the end of her expertise.

post #8 of 25

My thoughts are with you and your daughter. I hope it all works out, best wishes.

post #9 of 25

Just being induced early doesn't mean you won't be able to breastfeed, or that you will have problems with it. Any kind of intervention CAN cause problems, but most can be sorted with good support.

 

But breastfeeding isn't necessarily easy, and in some situations, due to really bad luck, it can be extremely difficult, and, of course, occasionally impossible. Our bit of "bad luck" was that DD mostly wanted to go to sleep, but couldn't, and therefore sucked very well, but didn't swallow much. In combination with my slow let-down and slow milk flow, my supply suddenly dipped at 4 weeks (and DD lost weight), and we had to work hard for 5 months to sort it out.

 

Don't give up. Every little bit of breastmilk helps. And I can't pump, I just don't get much out at all. In your daughter's shoes I'd use the lact-aid ad SNS, but try to feed without for a short while before putting it on maybe (or if baby is very hungry, maybe start with SNS for a few minutes, then close the tube on the bottle, and remove the other end from baby's mouth  for a while). We used Domp., although not initially, and while we could start slowly weaning off it after about 6 weeks or so, I know others who had to stay on it for as long as they were breastfeeding, or supply would plummet.

post #10 of 25

You've got a lot of good suggestions and I'd keep going as 4 weeks in is still early but I wanted to say that breastfeeding isn't just about the milk.  No one should feel like they have to give up those sessions at the breast even if it's one or two per day, just because they don't have a full supply! It's much more the process than the product. Even if a mom is breastfeeding with little or even no milk, that doesn't mean that there aren't wonderful things going on. 

post #11 of 25

I've had this problem before.  It's not fun and it's so frustrating. Everyday I wanted  and did cry.  Finally, I took my baby and went to bed.  Literally.  Then...I drank water, water, water and nursed and nursed and nursed....but I stayed in bed and little by little the milk came....it just took..a long time to get there.  I wish I had better advice and a magic pill.....greensad.gif

post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by at-home View Post

I am still on this breastfeeding journey with my daughter.  Her labor was induced and the hospital staff was not very supportive of breastfeeding from the start (this is her first child and the staff convinced her that she needed to give him formula).  Anyway, she is been a real trooper, very dedicated to breastfeeding:  She took fenugreek & blessed thistle, then Reglan and has been pumping with a good pump (first a single pump, now on a double pump) round the clock all these weeks.  The milk increased a little with the Reglan, but as soon as she finished the prescription, it trickled back down to almost nothing.  She has asked her doctor who checked her thyroid.  Her thryroid was slightly low but  "nothing to worry about."  She is at a loss and ready to give up.  I know there must be a reason for this!  Any suggestions?


What a struggle.  Props to you and your daughter for working so hard at this.

 

Did anyone check for a bit of retained placenta? 
 

post #13 of 25
I too am wondering about retained placenta.
post #14 of 25

Also, I know that abrupt weaning (of mom) from domperidone can result in a huge dip in supply - may be the same with reglan.

post #15 of 25

PCOS can also cause low supply issues. Does she have PCOS?

post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 

I've wondered about PCOS, too, although she hasn't been diagnosed with that.   Also, retained placenta has been a concern of mine, but her dr. insists that is not the case.  Thank you everyone for your suggestions. 

post #17 of 25

At any rate, if it doesn't work out, would you consider supplementing with donated milk? You can use milk share or eats on feets to find a donor. There are so many women out there with extra milk, that would help out. Best wishes. What a wonderful mom to try so hard.

post #18 of 25

Well done for sticking it out this long. Another potential reason - Insufficient glandular tissue? 

post #19 of 25

Bravo to your daughter for doing what she can this far.  Breastfeeding is not so easy for everyone.  I had an extremely difficult time, but in the end breastfed my daughter 10 months.  A strong support system is ESSENTIAL. Even those well-meaning women saying "breastfeeding is so easy and natural and the most beautiful thing in the world"  bothered me to the core as I bled and ached with each feeding.  Every situation is different.  The combination of my holding her wrong and her not latching on very well contributed to our challenges.  I began exclusively pumping, so that I can heal and in the end that worked for us.  I mostly pumped and latched her on at night and in the mornings (once I healed)


Here is what worked for me.  This helped me get through 10 months --

 

1)  Strong support system - I went to a breastfeeding support group weekly and worked with a LC

2)  The baby's latch will get better as her neck muscles strengthen

3)  Latch the baby on --- ALL THE TIME -- not only to feed but for stimulation - even at night.

4)  Pump after the the baby feeds for additional stimulation. Even for 10 or 15 minutes.

4)  Throw away feeding schedules and put the baby to the breast anytime he wants.

3)  Lots of cuddle time (skin-to-skin contact) will increase supply

3)  Relaxation, relaxation, relaxtion!  - When my supply would dip, I would settle comfortably on my couch, dim the lights, soft music and pump with the baby in the room). If I was stressed and tried to pump, I wouldn't pump much.

4)  If exclusively pumping - pump at night too, every 3 or 4 hours

4)  Lots and lots of liquids (water, vitamin water, chicken broth)

5)  Oatmeal - All the time!

6)  Eating well and healthy - lots of veggies and fruits.

 

Good luck!! It is possible.  Remind her that she is a fantastic Mommy no matter what!!!! 

post #20 of 25

Hi!

What a rough situation for your daughter to be in.  This sounds incredibly frustrating.

I agree with what alot of the pp wrote- rest, bed, lost of round the clock nursing are essential for helping to bring in the milk.

Also, every drop of milk counts, so even if your daughter feeds one or two feedings a day and then has to supplement with formula, it is still a success.  How is the baby's diaper count?  Enough wet and poop diapers?

Also, for me, a good dark beer really helps my milk flow- especially in the evening.  Also, drinking chamomile tea helped me with my supply- but I don't know if the tea is recommended or not.

Good luck!

~maddymama

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