or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Birth Plans? - Page 2

post #21 of 59


For my hospital birth I had a heplock/hepwell, where they put the needle in but cap it off instead of hook you to a wire. That gives them fast access if they need it. It was in the back of my hand, and for the most part was all right, but it did get in my way a little and was somewhat painful. I think if it could have been elsewhere (forearm?) it wuold have been better.

 

Curious who your OB is... you're in columbus oh right (if not ignore me lol)? You can PM me if you don't want to post it. I used to be a doula so I love hearing about natural-friendly OBs in the area :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanca78 View Post
I don't mean to hijack the thread but I'm looking for stories of what it's actually like to have one in. Were you actually attached to the pole, or did you have a heplock/sodium well for most of your labor?

 

My OB is pretty natural birth friendly and otherwise hands off (I've heard from doulas who have worked with her) but is fairly insistent on an IV.

 

TIA!


 

post #22 of 59
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleumoose View Post


For my hospital birth I had a heplock/hepwell, where they put the needle in but cap it off instead of hook you to a wire. That gives them fast access if they need it. It was in the back of my hand, and for the most part was all right, but it did get in my way a little and was somewhat painful. I think if it could have been elsewhere (forearm?) it wuold have been better.

 

Curious who your OB is... you're in columbus oh right (if not ignore me lol)? You can PM me if you don't want to post it. I used to be a doula so I love hearing about natural-friendly OBs in the area :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanca78 View Post
I don't mean to hijack the thread but I'm looking for stories of what it's actually like to have one in. Were you actually attached to the pole, or did you have a heplock/sodium well for most of your labor?

 

My OB is pretty natural birth friendly and otherwise hands off (I've heard from doulas who have worked with her) but is fairly insistent on an IV.

 

TIA!


 


I also just had the heplock. Does your OB only request the heplock or must you be attached to the IV?
 

post #23 of 59


I need to clarify that with her. She referred to it as an IV but it seems totally bizarre to want me attached to a pole the whole time. She said something like, "sometimes I've had trouble getting access when I needed it with just the needle in there," but I got the feeling she was open to just a heplock/hepwell. The potential doula I talked to said she thought this doctor's patients had just had the well before. I would not be wild about that, but would be okay with it. A pole? Not so much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hannybanany View Post

 

 


I also just had the heplock. Does your OB only request the heplock or must you be attached to the IV?
 

post #24 of 59

I am going to stalk Nanette from here on out... you are already my hero, woman!!! thumb.gif Go mama, go!!!

post #25 of 59
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bleumoose View Post


Just a few thoughts...  in purple

 

Another thought.. and please don't be mad :) ... but because you've got twins, I think making a plan for a c-section birth would be a good idea. C-sections are pretty common for twins even with moms who start out laboring intending a vaginal birth (in my part of the country anyway). That way, just in case one is necessary for one or both babies, you're prepared. You can keep it on a separate page and only bring it out in the event you need it.


 



Thanks so much for your suggestions mama! I'm going to amend those parts. I know I have to do a C-section plan, but I'm dreading it, so thus have been avoiding it. I WILL have it done prior to going in though!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird Girl View Post

Nanette, will this be your first birth? First labors often last longer than ten hours, though, obviously, your mileage may vary. Accepting antibiotics in labor for Group B strep may prevent unneeded days of hospitalization for "observation" later--if you are GBS positive, they will be watching your babies like hawks. You may want to talk it over with your care provider.

 

Another thing is that many women vomit quite a bit in labor--especially if they try to drink or especially eat. Avoiding dehydration through the use of an IV can be a way to save your strength, especially if nausea and vomiting become an issue for you as you progress in labor.

 

I have been very fortunate, in that the two hospitals I delivered in were very natural-friendly. My babies automatically roomed-in, were not given any artificial nipples, my husband cut their cords, etc. In the first case, I was GBS negative, but the IV really gave me the strength to keep going through 30+ hours of labor and 3 hours of pushing. In the second, I was GBS positive, and nurses were very relieved to hear that I'd had both doses of ABX, when my son had a mild breathing issue on his first night (It turned out, he'd swallowed too much amniotic fluid and had an overly full tummy!)

 

You may feel great during your labor, or hungry, or what have you. But if you can't keep anything down, do consider the IV--mine was pretty painless and did not prevent me from using the bathroom, the shower, the birth ball, or anything else.


Not my first birth no, this will be my second and third births. My son was born 6 hours from the time I was induced, so I have no idea what a natural labor will be like for me as far as length? As for the ABX thing, our select-vax/anti-antibiotic pediatrician is coming to see the babies in the hospital!!! I was so psyched. He is THE best. His goal is to get them discharged as FAST as possible so they don't catch anything- he's pretty anti-hospital, and is the pedi for most of the HBs in our area (he knows all the CPS horror stories) :) So he'll do the blood test, and then send us home, we've already talked about it. He said he doesn't want residents "messing with the babies" :)

 

I had an IV during my first labor, and it did nothing other than have me swell up like a balloon for 3 days afterwards, but I had an epidural, so I guess it's necessary in those cases :( If I start that vomiting stuff though, I wont' take any chances and will ask for the IV.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestmeg View Post

I am going to stalk Nanette from here on out... you are already my hero, woman!!! thumb.gif Go mama, go!!!

 

Thanks lady! I feel the fighting spirit already. I had my first argument with my OB's nurse the FIRST time I met her (refused the urine test until I was told what exactly they were testing). Now we get along great, she knows I don't give in, so she picks her battles, and instead phrases everything as a "suggestion" rather than a demand :) Most recently: "I know you're going to refuse it, but we're supposed to do the 1hour GTT next time, can we do the breakfast instead?" She's been pretty easy to train ;) Let's hope I can do the same with this Doc!

 

 

 


 

post #26 of 59

I hope I'm as blessed Nanette. I hope to get prenatal care as soon as medicaid accept me but they still haven't. But, if I do, I will be refusing all sorts of things. I just hope that the hospital midwife I know of will take me and that she takes medicaid. I think she doesn't but not positive. 

 

Sounds like things are going well for you though and I think you are setting up for a good birth experience. :)

post #27 of 59

We're planning a UC, so I'm assuming that if we're going to the hospital, I need pain relief or there's a problem with the baby. So ours is a little different.

 

Pain Relief:

  • Amanda would like pain relief offered immediately.

  • “Walking” epidural anesthesia is preferable to IV medications.

  • After the initial offer, please do not offer again unless requested.

 

Interventions:

  • If Baby is in distress, please discuss the need for interventions such as Pitocin, vacuum/forceps delivery or Cesarean delivery.

  • No Cytotec (misoprostal) is to be administered at any time.

  • Please do not perform an episiotomy. Amanda would prefer to tear naturally.

 

Second Stage:

  • If physically able, Amanda will assume upright positions for pushing and birth.

  • If medicated, Amanda would appreciate assistance for squat, side-lying, or all-fours positions.

  • Please do not count or direct pushing unless Baby is in distress or Amanda is unable to feel to push.

  • Please do not place any time limits on pushing.

 

After the Birth:

  • Please place Baby on Amanda's chest immediately unless Baby needs immediate medical attention.

  • Please do not routinely administer Pitocin or apply umbilical traction in order to extract the placenta.

  • Please do not clamp or cut the cord until it has stopped pulsating and placenta has been delivered.

  • Amanda does not consent to manual examination of the cesarean scar.

  • Amanda and Baby would like to be released as soon as possible and recover at home.

 

Cesarean Section:

  • Please wait until after anesthesia to insert a catheter.

  • Amanda would like to discuss ways to avoid the severe vomiting experienced after her previous cesarean.

  • We would like the surgery described as it is happening and the screen lowered or a mirror placed.

  • Amanda would like to hold Baby while being stitched and breastfeed in recovery if possible.

  • Please double-suture uterus.

  • Dissolving stitches are highly preferred to staples or traditional sutures.

 

Care of Baby:

  • We waive all eye ointments and vaccinations.

  • If Baby is a boy, we do not want him circumcised or his foreskin manipulated in any way.

  • Amanda is planning to breastfeed. Please do not administer any liquids other than breastmilk (including formula and glucose) or introduce artificial nipples (including pacifiers and bottles).

  • Amanda would like to room-in unless medical problems necessitate nursery care.

  • Amanda and/or Michael will accompany Baby whenever it is medically necessary for Baby to leave Amanda's room.

 

Thank you for respecting our wishes and making our special experience a safe and happy one.

post #28 of 59

Does anyone have a birth plan for a birth center?  We're most likely going with a birth center so a lot of the items listed on some of the birth plans above aren't really relevant - like eating and drinking b/c they are all for that. 

post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by alireb View Post

Does anyone have a birth plan for a birth center?  We're most likely going with a birth center so a lot of the items listed on some of the birth plans above aren't really relevant - like eating and drinking b/c they are all for that. 


My birth plan at the bottom of the first page of this thread has our birth center birth plan.

post #30 of 59

Sorry--I didn't mean to disappear. I had heplocks with both IVs, in the back of the hand. During my first birth, I was in the hospital for a long, long time, before DD was born, and the heplock got a little sore after day 3. The second time, I didn't notice it at all. It was about as uncomfortable as my hair being swept up with pins.  Honestly--I was in labor, and that's pretty distracting from minor things like the heplock.

 

Nanette--I swelled up a ton after my first birth, too! I swear, I got more stretch marks after DD was born than before. It didn't happen after my son's birth, though, and I had IVs for both. Weird!

post #31 of 59

I want to give you some encouragement as a nurse. I am not in L&D, but I'm friends with several smile.gif

 

There are some things that just come standard... if you address them in your plan, it might make it look like you "don't know what's up."

That can lead to them rolling their eyes and ignoring the rest of the plan (& your wishes).

 

For example, intermittent monitoring is a given at our hospital. Only high-risk situations call for continuous monitoring.

If I were delivering in my hospital, I'd just remind the nurse, "you're gonna take this off until we need to monitor again, right?"

 

When it comes to addressing emergency issues, there are staff who might see something on your plan and dismiss it immediately "for the health of the baby."

But if you and your partner just decide to flip onto all fours if something seems stuck, this is something the doctor will usually just go along with.

Oh look, a patient who knows about shoulder dystocia! And you didn't even have to freak him out with your hippie ways by talking about it beforehand smile.gif

 

Another issue is the eye ointment, etc. There are so many shift changes and chaotic things going on,

I wouldn't feel the need to set myself up for a lecture by writing that I don't want my baby to have the gentamycin ointment.

I would just maintain skin-to-skin and refuse each time it's offered.

 

Lastly, find an advocate on the inside! Most nurses are 1:1 with laboring patients. Make HER part of your birth plan, once you fill her in.

 

This might feel like you're being less prepared, but in reality...it's helping you sail under the radar.

Feel free to use empowered, educated, and sneaky tactics to get what you want out of a hospital birth!

Remember, you're on THEIR turf. Use it to your advantage!

post #32 of 59

Hmmm.  Thanks for the insight Rachel.  I'm not sure I agree though.  First off - I don't feel I'm on their turf.  This is MY BIRTH and they are there to serve me and the baby.  Second, I WANT them to know I"m not the average, uneducated-about-birth patient.  Bring on the argument about eye ointment!  I'm right and they don't have a leg to stand on!  The fact that women have to stoop to sneaky tactics to get quality care is abhorrent.  I for one refuse to operate under that paradigm.  I think if we all did the same we might be able to change the system.

 

I do agree with you to know what you are talking about by knowing the hospital's standard care first.  If CEFM is not often used then I'd leave it out and fight my battles but this is MY child and I don't care if the nurses roll their eyes - I get to decide what goes into my baby.  It won't just be on my birth plan but on their bassinet and blanket.  They can do routine with someone else.  MY kid is not routine.

 

Whew, sorry little bit of passion there! 

post #33 of 59

Here is mine for the current birth (posted old plans on first page). Revised somewhat from DS, and I may tweak it more.

 

Our Desires
•I would like to push only when I have an urge to push with no coaching

•I would like to have support of the perineum to avoid tearing.
•My husband and I would like to discover the sex ourselves
•My preferences for immediately after the birth are

-          to have immediate skin-to-skin contact between my baby & me

-          to be left undisturbed for 1 hour following birth, newborn procedures performed afterward.

•I would like clamping & cutting of the umbilical cord to be delayed until blood stops pulsing. If resuscitation is necessary, please do so with the cord uncut. I would like my husband to cut the cord.

•I would like to deliver the placenta spontaneously. Please do not pull on the cord.

•I would like all newborn procedures to be performed in our presence, preferably bedside. In case of an emergency with our baby, my husband will accompany our baby at all times.

What We Wish to Avoid
I do not wish to have

-          artificial rupturing of membranes without my consent

-          an episiotomyunless needed in the event of an emergency

•I plan to breastfeed our baby & would like to do so immediately after birth, please do not offer a pacifier or any bottles at any time during our stay, including formula & glucose water.
•We do not consentto the following:

-          CIRCUMCISION

-          Vitamin K shot

-          Hepatitis B vaccine

-          erythromycin treatment in the eyes

 

If a Cesarean is necessary

·                     Please administer anesthesia before inserting the catheter; I prefer a spinal

·                     Please set the curtain low so I can see the baby as he is born

·                     Please try to keep the cord intact for a few minutes before cutting it

·                     please show me my baby as he is born and place him on my chest if there are no complications, my husband will assist

·                     Please do a double closure

·                     I prefer subcutaneous stitches and tape rather than staples

·                     I would like to view the placenta

·                     I would like my baby to accompany me to my recovery room


Edited by CookAMH - 12/28/10 at 8:47pm
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanette56 View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pattimomma View Post

Nanette I was wondering why you were doing U/C at a hotel instead of your home. Is your home very far from the hospital? The reason I ask is, part of my reasoning for homebirth is that it is a cleaner environment (no weird hospital born infection things) but from my experience at hotels (I travel a lot for work and stay in pretty upscale places) is that all hotels are pretty filthy. Can someone clean your room before hand, and I don't mean the hotel staff, but someone who really cares about what you or the babes might be exposed to in there?

 

I'm totally with you on the nastiness of the hotel. I travel frequently for conferences too :) The first thing I do at any hotel room I stay in is change the sheets and comforters, I ALWAYS travel with my own set. DH thinks I'm a little crazy about that stuff, but uck, who knows what's on those sheets.... Yes, unfortunately I live an hour and 30 minutes from the nearest hospital, 1 hour and 45 from my PREFERRED hospital, and I've never even done a h/b before, much less a u/c. My doula has been through many births at the birth center, but obviously she's not a midwife. Even though I've read the books, and DH has read the books, I'm still fairly nervous about the whole thing, and my nerves would probably interfere with labor if I added the additional stress of knowing I was that far away from the hospital. KWIM? My mom and I are both germ freaks though, so I know if I can't clean for some reason, she'll make sure it gets done :)

 

And here's my proposed birth plan:

 

BIRTH PLAN

NO ABX/NO ANESTHESIA/NATURAL LABOR
                    NO CIRC/NO VAX


FOR THE DOC (I don't think this part will be on my hospital birth plan, but rather stuff I go over with my OB)      

As long as the babies and I are healthy, I would like to have no time restrictions on the length of my pregnancy, and prefer to go into labor naturally rather than be induced.
    
I would like to discuss laboring at home as long as possible.

I trust that medical staff will seek out my opinion concerning all of the issues directly affecting my birth before deviating from my plan.

Please do not strip my membranes unless I specifically request that this be done.

I prefer to have only one vaginal exam on or around my due date.    

        
For the L&D nurses:

 

I request that my partner stay with me AT ALL TIMES unless I direct otherwise, or he is required to accompany babies somewhere.

 Please discuss all procedures, no matter how routine they are, with us, before doing them.

I request that my partner, my mother, and my doula be the only visitors allowed admittance to my room during labor. I request that medical staff be kept to an absolute minimum (no residents or students please)

Despite my GBS status, I request that no antibiotics be administered while I am in labor unless one or more of the following occurs:
1) I get a fever during labor.
2) Labor lasts longer than 10 hours.
3) Babies are pre-term.
Please give me the waiver to sign upon admittance.

Whatever my GBS status, I DO request a hibiclens/chlorhexidine wash (or the equivalent) be administered at the time I go into labor or at rupture of membranes, whichever occurs first (If it has not already been administered)

I request that I have no IV or port of any kind unless a C-section is required.

I request that I have no blood pressure cuff on my arm during labor.

Please offer pain medications ONLY if I ask for them, as I am planning to deliver without the use of pain management medications (including epidurals).

I request that I be able to eat and drink freely during labor.

I prefer that fetal heart tones be monitored intermittently with an external monitor or Doppler.

I request that I be able to move into any position and walk as needed during labor.

I request that induction not be discussed until at least12 hours into labor.

In the event induction is necessary, I request that I be allowed to try natural induction techniques (breast stimulation, castor oil, walking, sexual intercourse...etc.) prior to medical induction.

If medical induction becomes necessary then I prefer to try stripping the membranes or pitocin in lieu of rupturing membranes.

I would like no internal vaginal exams (THIS INCLUDES DILATION CHECKS) during my labor until I have an urge to push.    

As long as the baby and I are healthy, I prefer to have no time limits on pushing.

I do not want an episiotomy administered. If necessary to prevent tearing I would like a perineal massage to be administered.        

I do not want to be told how or when to push.

I would like the freedom to push and deliver my babies in any position I like.

I would prefer for the placenta to be born spontaneously without the use of pitocin, and/or controlled traction on the umbilical cord.

AT BIRTH:

Once first baby is born, I would like her to be placed skin-to-skin on my abdomen with a warm blanket over her. Once I have had a few minutes with her, I would like to nurse her to begin contractions for the second baby.

 

Once second baby is born, I would like him to be placed skin-to-skin on my abdomen with a warm blanket over him. We would not like babies to be removed from the room.


Unless there is a medical emergency, please allow the umbilical cords to stop pulsating before they are clamped and cut. Dad WOULD LIKE to cut the cords.

 

AFTERCARE NURSES

     We would prefer that babies not leave their mother unless there is a medical emergency. If the babies must leave the room for evaluation or medical treatment, Mom or Dad will accompany the babies.    

     We would like to waive the administration of eye antibiotics, and will sign a waiver if needed.

      We would like ONLY the orally administered vitamin K to be given to our babies. If it is not available, do NOT administer vitamin K to our babies.

      We would like to waive the administration of the Hep B vaccination.

    We decline routine PKU testing at the hospital and have made other arrangements for this procedure at a later date this week.        

    Because the babies regular pediatrician will attend them at the hospital, we prefer that the on-call pediatrician not attend them.

    My babies are to be exclusively breastfed. Please do not offer my babies formula, pacifiers, artificial nipples or sugar water without my consent.

I would like to see a lactation consultant as soon as possible for further recommendations and guidance.

      We are anticipating the arrival of a boy and do NOT plan to circumcise.

 

 

Am I forgetting anything? Is this too long? Is there stuff that they'll already know about on here?

 

Thanks for reviewing ladies!
        

 



Hello,

 

I am a CNM who is also a lurker in this DDC (due 4/26 with #4).  I wanted to add my .02 from the perspective of a natural birth advocate who has always worked in somewhat hostile to natural birth environments.  This birth plan is a little long--- not in the sense that someone would just have a problem with it, but that it is so long it would be hard to remember everything in it, so the nurses would either have to read through it every time, continually ask you questions about it, or screw things up.  And that will set things up to be adversarial.  Definitely consider separating them to separate labor and postpartum.  Also consider bullet points instead of long sentences.  The sentences sound more polite but frankly if your provider was going to cut an episiotiomy anyway it is not going to make a difference if you politely request perineal massage but "No episiotomy!" would cut through.

 

I am also wondering about your logic on a couple of items.  For instance why would you consent to antibiotics for GBS after 10 hours of labor?  A bag of water that has been broken for more than 18 hours is considered an increased risk factor but length of labor alone is not (with an intact bag).  Also, refusing antibiotic treatment will possibly set your babies up for antibiotic treatment, lumbar puncture, etc.  I am not saying that I agree with those things, I am just saying that treatment for GBS is considered standard protocol and when that treatment is not to standard there are other tests that the medical establishment considers apropriate.  Clorhexidine wash is supported by some literature but is not part of the CDC protocol so I would be shocked if a provider/hospital not only okayed that as an alternative but also provided it.  ** I am not trying to question you or change your mind about anything, but these are the discussions that your provider should have with you prior to labor**

 

"Induction" is starting a labor, "augmentation" is when they give pitocin to speed up a labor that is not progressing as quickly as they desire so be sure you use those terms correctly.

 

It is incredibly important for you to have a discussion about your plans for your birth with your care provider as soon as possible.  Although I consider it reasonable, most care providers (particularly MDs) are not going to consider certain things negotiable like IV access, post delivery pitocin, etc.  Most of the items in your birth plan are provider preference (amount/type of monitoring, position, IV access, placenta delivery) and the nurses will not be able to change the provider's orders.  Obviously you can refuse anything, but it would be much better to have the provider on board in the first place.  Also, when you are interviewing peds run your preferences for the babies by them and make sure you get their support and see if they will come to the hospital when the babies arrive- most babies are not seen by a ped until the next day but there are standing order sets that call for things like the hep b vaccine that are activated at birth.

 

Hope you don't mind my input, it is easier coming from the other side to see how some of these things will be viewed.

post #35 of 59
Quote:

Hope you don't mind my input, it is easier coming from the other side to see how some of these things will be viewed.


I think that is helpful, glad you gave your input.

post #36 of 59
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:

 




Hello,

For instance why would you consent to antibiotics for GBS after 10 hours of labor?  A bag of water that has been broken for more than 18 hours is considered an increased risk factor but length of labor alone is not (with an intact bag).  Also, refusing antibiotic treatment will possibly set your babies up for antibiotic treatment, lumbar puncture, etc. 

 

"Induction" is starting a labor, "augmentation" is when they give pitocin to speed up a labor that is not progressing as quickly as they desire so be sure you use those terms correctly.

 

It is incredibly important for you to have a discussion about your plans for your birth with your care provider as soon as possible.  Although I consider it reasonable, most care providers (particularly MDs) are not going to consider certain things negotiable like IV access, post delivery pitocin, etc.  Most of the items in your birth plan are provider preference (amount/type of monitoring, position, IV access, placenta delivery) and the nurses will not be able to change the provider's orders.  Obviously you can refuse anything, but it would be much better to have the provider on board in the first place.  Also, when you are interviewing peds run your preferences for the babies by them and make sure you get their support and see if they will come to the hospital when the babies arrive- most babies are not seen by a ped until the next day but there are standing order sets that call for things like the hep b vaccine that are activated at birth.

 

Hope you don't mind my input, it is easier coming from the other side to see how some of these things will be viewed.

 

Thanks for your input mama, it was really helpful!!

 

I have modified the plan, so that original one is no longer accurate. I actually have a separate one that I'm going to try and get my OB to sign.

 

As for the GBS antibiotics: I assumed they would know that I meant 10 hours from the time my water broke, and  didn't know that 18 hours was the "danger" point. Right now it just says extended rupture of bag of waters, so I will be more specific. I am now GBS negative, and I'm going to refuse further urine tests at this point. The most they can do is harass me about it or treat me like I'm positive, which really won't make a difference to me. The risks of antibiotic resistant ecoli and complications from the ABX to me, are more likely and more dangerous than the risk of GBS itself. I feel like I would be being pro-active in putting my babies at risk. I know that may not be how everyone feels, so just want to say that's just my own personal feeling toward the ABX.

 

As for the babies treatment post delivery, my pediatrician is coming to the hospital to see them that day. Unless of course we're talking middle of the night :) I have already spoken to him regarding the testing that I want done, and he's on board with it. He's pretty anti-ABX himself, and said that he normally wouldn't even do a blood culture because of my current GBS status (I'm negative now). But I want a culture to be safe, not a spinal, just blood. He knows I was GBS positive, am GBS negative now and will be refusing antibiotics, and thinks this particular new CDC rule is asinine. I will be doing the hibiclens wash myself, as my m/w told me they won't know what the heck I'm talking about if I mention it :)

 

Thank you for the clarification on induction and augmentation. I thought everything to do with Pitocin meant "induction."

 

I'll be seeing my OB for the first time on Wednesday and intend to hit him hard with the questions.

 

Frankly, though I know the nurses can make my life extremely difficult, I really feel that many women in labor try to be too nice to the L&D nurses, and wind up trying to pacify them while in labor. I'm not going to go in there trying to make their lives difficult, Ibut I WILL be aggressive about what I want. If that hurts feelings, or ticks people off, so be it. (My doula has agreed to be the pacifier) Not everyone agrees with this approach and thinks you can get more flies with honey, etc. But I've BTDT, and IMO they just treat you like a nitwit either way. I'd rather be U/Cing, and they'd rather have a cooperative patient, but not everyone gets what they want- maybe that's just the attorney in me though lol

 

Thanks a bunch for you input though- it helps to have someone that knows their way around a hospital to advise on issues like these!
 

post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanette56 View Post

 I'd rather be U/Cing, and they'd rather have a cooperative patient, but not everyone gets what they want- maybe that's just the attorney in me though lol

 



So, you've decided not to UC? I think it would be much more peaceful for sure. I hate vag exams, and being told what to do, etc. Was your DP not cool with it? 

post #38 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dayiscoming2006 View Post



So, you've decided not to UC? I think it would be much more peaceful for sure. I hate vag exams, and being told what to do, etc. Was your DP not cool with it? 



I've ordered the necessary supplies to U/C already (I know I'm early!) DH says he's leaving it in my hands, and says he trusts me with making decisions for myself and our babies, so he's on board with whatever :) My mother, however, is not on board, and starts bawling if I even bring it up. She's cool with the laboring out of the hospital as long as possible, so we'll probably make it look like an oops. My doula is also on board with attending. I just don't want any stress if I feel like I need meds or I feel like somethings not quite right and I want to go to the hospital. I want to be able to go if and when I want to, so I'm prepared. But yes, if it comes to having to be there, I'm going to be upset that I'm not getting my dream birth at home :(

post #39 of 59
Quote:

It is incredibly important for you to have a discussion about your plans for your birth with your care provider as soon as possible.  Although I consider it reasonable, most care providers (particularly MDs) are not going to consider certain things negotiable like IV access, post delivery pitocin, etc.  Most of the items in your birth plan are provider preference (amount/type of monitoring, position, IV access, placenta delivery) and the nurses will not be able to change the provider's orders.  Obviously you can refuse anything, but it would be much better to have the provider on board in the first place.  Also, when you are interviewing peds run your preferences for the babies by them and make sure you get their support and see if they will come to the hospital when the babies arrive- most babies are not seen by a ped until the next day but there are standing order sets that call for things like the hep b vaccine that are activated at birth.

 

Hope you don't mind my input, it is easier coming from the other side to see how some of these things will be viewed.


I appreciate the views from the inside as well.  I'm shocked at the bolded part.  Can they inject that into your child without consent???

 

This is the reason I'm so lax about labor.  I want to choose my battles.  And even though I don't want an IV it pales in comparison to how UNBELIEVABLY ANGRY I'd be if they injected my child with this horrible, unneccesary "vaccine".  It makes me sick to my stomach thinking about it.  To the point that I only want my birth plan to include these things that are SO VERY important to me.

 

I guess I'm extra frightened because of twins and the possible need that my babies would have to be taken from me for any amount of time.  DD couldn't have had anything done because I was always with her, you know? 

post #40 of 59


I was already looked at like i had 2 heads because i didn't just sign the paperwork about minimum procedures for labor at my last visit, I just wanted to discuss the things, which were the IV access, the antibiotics if I am GBS+ and intermittant fetal monitoring. I did feel a lot better talking to my midwife prior to signing. It just was a complete different deal with ds, and I made it clear that I did not want IV fluids unless necessary, because it is not fun being hooked up to all the machines, and the midwife agreed, so I did end up signing the paperwork in the end.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bleumoose View Post


For my hospital birth I had a heplock/hepwell, where they put the needle in but cap it off instead of hook you to a wire. That gives them fast access if they need it. It was in the back of my hand, and for the most part was all right, but it did get in my way a little and was somewhat painful. I think if it could have been elsewhere (forearm?) it wuold have been better.

 

Curious who your OB is... you're in columbus oh right (if not ignore me lol)? You can PM me if you don't want to post it. I used to be a doula so I love hearing about natural-friendly OBs in the area :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanca78 View Post
I don't mean to hijack the thread but I'm looking for stories of what it's actually like to have one in. Were you actually attached to the pole, or did you have a heplock/sodium well for most of your labor?

 

My OB is pretty natural birth friendly and otherwise hands off (I've heard from doulas who have worked with her) but is fairly insistent on an IV.

 

TIA!


 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: April 2011