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Any Rh Negative UCers? - Page 2

post #21 of 94

Moved this from Birth Professionals, to UC

post #22 of 94

I am Rh-. I went all main stream with my first with the prenatal rhogam. My son was Rh- too, so no postnatal rhogam. I have no clue what my second son is. I didn't get prenatal rhogam with him and I was in Romania when I gave birth and know they had no clue about my Rh status. So far my current pregnancy seems fine so I'm assuming either he's Rh- or Rh+ but, I'm not sensitized. Hubby is Rh+. 

 

I'm not sure that I will concern myself about it this pregnancy. I may have baby's blood type tested at the doc or with a couple eldon cards (heard there can be some incorrect readings with those so I'd get 2.) I'm not a fan of getting injected with human blood products though. That just freaks me out so, probably I won't get it at all.

post #23 of 94

If your blood type is a negative and your Partners' is positive then you have the possibility of having  an Rh- baby. If his blood type is negative like you then no worries. My DH is O- as am I. So no worries.

post #24 of 94

For those who are concerned about Rhogam being a blood product, it seems important to point out that one of the treatments during a sensitized pregnancy for a baby that is becoming anemic (but too early to be born) is in utero cord blood transfusions, which is obviously a blood product being administered to the baby. 

post #25 of 94

My son got a very severe case of abnormal jaundice and hemolytic anemia from ABO incompatibility. This is the same result as untreated RH- and other blood disorders like E/e,D/d, Kell etc. antigens., but it happens when you and your baby have a different blood type- 1 in 15 do, but problems from it are rare.

 

ABO incompatability is not as serious as RH disease, but he still spent 3.5 WEEKS in NICU, at a cost of 5k a day!!! He had phototherapy,immune globulin (what they give RH- I think) and ALMOST needed an exchange transfusion- he just barely made the cut off or avoiding this. There were other things done, but I don't recall all the treatments off hand.

 

It SUCKED, that's along time in NICU away fro mom for an otherwise healthy baby. If I could have gotten me and him shots and avoided this, I would have done it in a heartbeat. I am thankful it wasn't worse. With RH, the baby can die- Kell or D/d antigens are next in severity- so, if my baby was this affected from ABO, imagine what would happen with RH- and no treatment. Please don't avoid the shots if you need them.

 

BTW,

Im not RH-, but am B+, sensitized to big E, little e (yes, thats what its called) from past blood transfusion, and there is no shot for it, if DH had either. While DH didn't have E/e, he is AB+. The peri told us it would be OK, so I quit having the extra, and crazy expensive, ultrasounds for artery flow. It was shocking to end up with this same problem,but from a different source.

post #26 of 94

new solar momma 2:

Thanks for the info. I'll keep it in mind. 

post #27 of 94

It is important to note that even though thimerosal was removed, it does not mean there are not other preservatives and metals, such as aluminum.   We do not do the prenatal rhogam.  We asses the risk pp.   Please, in addition to asking here, do some serious research if you wind up being rh(-),  reading the rhogam insert, the CDC's site, as well as the alternative points-of-view.   Make informed decisions!

post #28 of 94

I'm rh negative. I will not get the shot. I've had five kids and had the shot with the first three and then did research. I did not get it with the last two. I am pregnant again and will test my last baby to see. My last birth was perfect so no trauma to have caused any blood to mix. It's a personal decision. I trusted God to protect me so far he has:)   

post #29 of 94

Historically, Rh disease has been devastating to families.  When I was pregnant with my oldest dd, I was student-teaching with an older man.  He was completely supportive of my work and accommodating of my pregnancy, and when I mentioned that I was Rh- , his face turned completely white and he started crying.  His younger brother had been born brain damaged because of Rh disease, and his mom had gone on to have a heart-breaking series of late losses. 

 

The privilege of modern medicine is that treatment for Rh incompatibility means that women are no longer confronted with the consequences of Rh disease on a frequent basis.  Lucky us.  There are lots of good questions to ask here - can Rhogam be made safer?  Is the prenatal shot truly necessary for all Rh- women with Rh+ partners?  But while a few people will be unlucky with the shot resulting in sensitized pregnancies, and a few people will be lucky trusting their faith and never be sensitized at all, Rhogam has saved a lot of lives and prevented a lot of grief.  It has an excellent safety record.  By all means, be informed.  But please also remember you're not protecting yourself from sensitization, your protecting your future pregnancies, and it's often possible to do so by getting a shot shortly after birth if you are concerned about exposing your infant to chemical preservatives in the Rhogam formulation. 

 

post #30 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by stik View Post

Historically, Rh disease has been devastating to families.  When I was pregnant with my oldest dd, I was student-teaching with an older man.  He was completely supportive of my work and accommodating of my pregnancy, and when I mentioned that I was Rh- , his face turned completely white and he started crying.  His younger brother had been born brain damaged because of Rh disease, and his mom had gone on to have a heart-breaking series of late losses. 

 

The privilege of modern medicine is that treatment for Rh incompatibility means that women are no longer confronted with the consequences of Rh disease on a frequent basis.  Lucky us.  There are lots of good questions to ask here - can Rhogam be made safer?  Is the prenatal shot truly necessary for all Rh- women with Rh+ partners?  But while a few people will be unlucky with the shot resulting in sensitized pregnancies, and a few people will be lucky trusting their faith and never be sensitized at all, Rhogam has saved a lot of lives and prevented a lot of grief.  It has an excellent safety record.  By all means, be informed.  But please also remember you're not protecting yourself from sensitization, your protecting your future pregnancies, and it's often possible to do so by getting a shot shortly after birth if you are concerned about exposing your infant to chemical preservatives in the Rhogam formulation. 

 



I am Rh- and my husband is Rh+, I was on the fence until I discussed it with a good friend of mine who related the story of her birth.  It turns out that her mother was Rh- and when my friend was born that she almost died due to Rh disease.  She needed several blood transfusions as a brand new infant and thankfully survived, but I absolutely agree with stik to get the post pregnancy shot to help protect your future children, even if you're wary about the shot during your pregnancy.

post #31 of 94

Since ABO incompatibility is coming into the discussion, I'll throw this in:

 

(ABO incompatibility:  mother is type O, and baby is not.)

 

ABO-incompatibility is actually a natural protection against Rh-sensitization.  Most type O people have natural antibodies against A and B--that's why transfusions from types A, B, AB don't do them any good; they can donate to other types because there is still a net benefit from it, even with the hostile antibodies.  Unlike the anti-D antibodies involved in Rh issues, anti-A and anti-B antibodies are too large to cross the placenta, so they don't cause problems during pregnancy, only after birth sometimes.  In an ABO-incompatible pregnancy, any blood that crosses from the baby to the mother is likely to be destroyed by these anti-A or anti-B antibodies before it can cause Rh-sensitization.  I don't have any references handy for how much this lowers the Rh-sensitization rate for ABO-incompatible pregnancies, but there is a significant effect.

 

The challenge is that usually the baby's blood type is unknown until birth.  Fathers that are not type O can still be carrying a recessive O gene, and produce (with a type O mother) a type O baby, who would not be ABO-incompatible with the mother.  So this is only a factor to consider, not a factor that you can reliably count on. 

post #32 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by LivingforGod View Post

I'm rh negative. I will not get the shot. I've had five kids and had the shot with the first three and then did research. I did not get it with the last two. I am pregnant again and will test my last baby to see. My last birth was perfect so no trauma to have caused any blood to mix. It's a personal decision. I trusted God to protect me so far he has:)   

 

God has a funny history of blinking on this one.

 

I am Rh-, my husband is Rh+.  My first child is Rh- like me.  But my daughter - the child with whom I had placenta previa - is Rh+, and mamas, she *wore out* my first two Rhogam shots.  If God was looking out for me and my fertility, He chose to do it by putting me in a time and place where health care professionals have ready access to Rhogam.
 

post #33 of 94

  Oddly, this will be my first post on this board. I have been lurking for quite some time. I first starting reading the boards 3 years ago. What a wealth of knowledge and information/experience sharing. Okay. Enough of that, and on to my relevant point regarding being O-, Rhogam, and my experience in all of that.

 

               Reproductive history: 4 pregnancies, 3 live births, I have 2 dd ages near 7 and 3.5, am pregnant currently (!), and carried a surrogacy through for another family (their egg, their baby, my strange blood), I have also had a miscarriage. In all of this, I feel my experience has been really unique. I am very minimal in what I consider necessary medically. I am a healer myself, and know that I am more in tune with my body then a doctor (or even a midwife) could be. I appreciate other's knowledge and wisdom, and certainly consider any point from many angles. That said, it so happened that because I had declined the unnecessary bloodwork with my very mellow and relaxed homebirth midwives, I did not find out that I had O- blood until my third pregnancy. The first two were incredibly simple and straightforward pregnancies. Gentle, no trauma, sweet and perfect births at home.

 

                The surrogate pregnancy was more medicalized at the request of the parents. We used hospital midwives for pre-natal care (though the birth ended up being a UC, which is another story entirely), and soon learned of my blood type. We tested for the anti-bodies that would be present had I been sensitized in my previous pregnancies or births, as Rhogam had never even been considered. The worry of Rhogam and sensitization had not yet come up, and I wanted to know eveerything. I put in over 60 hours of research on the whole picture; pro arguments, against arguments, manufacturer's warnings, the making of, instances of contaminated blood being used in the pharmacutical version, and significant percentages of sensitization, the whole bit. I highly encourage every woman on this page to look into the subject deeply. One of my main points was that there should be no instance of blood mixing and thus, sensitization, if a gentle, intervention-free birth took place. This was, in fact, a big part of why I opted to birth free; I believe in birth, and know my body; I did not need to be in a place where I was psychologically and even physically unsafe, creating interventions and subjecting me to the possibility of sensitization from intervention. In a normal, natural birth where a woman facilitates her own experience, there should be no instance of blood mixing. Look intot he statistics; it has been a while for me. A good resource is Sarah Wickham, she wrote a book called "Anti-D in Midwifery: Panacea or Paradox" which you could delve into.

 

                 Good luck! I trust that you mamas will research thoroughly and trust your personal intstincts. We all have different stories and paths, one woman's choice is only right for her.

 

 

 

 

 

                           

post #34 of 94

hi

post #35 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaske View Post  Unlike the anti-D antibodies involved in Rh issues, anti-A and anti-B antibodies are too large to cross the placenta, so they don't cause problems during pregnancy, only after birth sometimes.  In an ABO-incompatible pregnancy, any blood that crosses from the baby to the mother is likely to be destroyed by these anti-A or anti-B antibodies before it can cause Rh-sensitization.  I don't have any references handy for how much this lowers the Rh-sensitization rate for ABO-incompatible pregnancies, but there is a significant effect.


ABO antibodies do cross the placenta

 

[quote]HDN can also be caused by an incompatibility of the ABO blood group. It arises when a mother with blood type O becomes pregnant with a fetus with a different blood type (type A, B, or AB). The mother's serum contains naturally occurring anti-A and anti-B, which tend to be of the IgG class and can therefore cross the placenta and hemolyse fetal RBCs.[/quote]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2266/

post #36 of 94

RH and blood incompatabilities aren't just a minor thing. Yes, you can have a pregnancy go just fine. However, you can also have a pregnancy go NOT fine. If you are sensitized, your body can attack your baby. It can lead to anemia and even death. This is why sensitized pregnancies NEED monitored. After birth, the type of jaundice that develops is severe. It has to be treated in the hospital. Your baby can be born anemic. Your baby can be born brain damaged or develop brain damage. Your baby may need an exchange transfusion. This is a threat to your baby's life and isn't just an "Oh, I don't want a blood product, but I'll test the baby after birth". This isn't about YOU, it's about your baby and after birth will be too late for the child who has been affected.

 

FTR- I found out I had an antibody with my 7th child. I had weekly scans to monitor her for signs of anemia starting at 21 weeks. One week, we were just points away from needing an intrauterine transfusion. She developed jaundice shortly after birth and her levels were rising quickly. She had to be in the NICU for 5 1/2 days under TRIPLE lights. They talked about possibly needing to do an exchange transfusion, but, luckily we avoided that. I'm glad that this was caught and we could manage it. We will never know if this contributed to her sister's death or not.

post #37 of 94

There's only like a 1.5 % decrease in potential sensitization when the Rhogam is given prenatally and there are known risks to prenatal Rhogam. The antibodies in the Rhogam can also attack an Rh+ baby as I've found from the research I've done. 

post #38 of 94

Daisycoming, do you have links to research showing that Rhogam antibodies can attack an Rh+ baby? 

post #39 of 94

 

http://www.nccn.net/~wwithin/rhogam.htm - this one lists some danger to the baby from the Rhogam prenatally.

 

http://www.unhinderedliving.com/rhogam.html

 

http://www.vegfamily.com/vegan-pregnancy/prenatal-rhogam.htm
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post

Daisycoming, do you have links to research showing that Rhogam antibodies can attack an Rh+ baby? 

post #40 of 94

Do you have anything from more reputable sources?

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