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January/February 2011 Book Challenge Thread - Page 4

post #61 of 110

January

1. Only Son - Kevin O'Brien

2. Planning To Live - Heather Wardell

3. The 7 Wonders That Will Change Your Life - Glenn Beck/ Keith Ablow

4. Life, Love and a Polar Bear Tatoo - Heather Wardell

5. Carved In Bone - Jefferson Bass

February

6. Thirteen Reasons Why- Jay Asher 

7. The Abstinence Teacher- Tom Perrotta

8. One Fine Day Your're Gonna Die- Gail Bowen  (90 pgs)))))

 9. Term Limits - Vince Flynn

post #62 of 110

Okay, I am joining.  :0)

I got a Kindle for Christmas and I have loaded it up with books.  Currently I am reading:

Room by Emma Donoghue

 

I am 82% done and hoping to finish tonight.

post #63 of 110
Just found this thread - I'd like to join to in my effort to read instead of watching TV in the evenings. Well, until True Blood starts in June smile.gif

I've started Anna Karenina and Lord of the Rings - Fellowship of the Ring since January and haven't finished either yet, so here we go...
post #64 of 110

OK so far...

1. Fledgling by Octavia E. Butler

2. Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia by Pamela Spiro Wagner and Carolyn Spiro

3. The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

4. Refuse to Choose!: Use All of Your Interests, Passions, and Hobbies to Create the Life and Career of Your Dreams by Barbara Sher

5. How to Talk so Kids Will Listen

6. Grass by Sheri S. Tepper

7. Half Life by Shelley Jackson

 

And I'm currently reading The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin. Of course I should be reading it right now instead of messing around on the computer! Or maybe I should be asleep.

post #65 of 110

 



After a long hiatus, I'm back! My DS was born 12 days ago, and I'm settling back into the couch for nursing/sleeping/reading all day for at least the next 2 weeks. (my DD goes to preschool so it really is blissful.)

Books so far include:

1. Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve

A YA book set in a future of municipal Darwinism where the cities all move and eat each other. This is the first of a series and sets up future stories quite nicely. The premise of this one is boy discovers his hero is not all he thought he was while adventuring with mysterious girl who is trying to kill his hero. I liked it and will be reading the next books.

2. Messiah Node by Lydia Moorehouse

Sci-fi with cyber-punk overtones mixed with religion/angels. This is the 3rd book in the series. Quick read.

3. Cinderella Ate My Daughter by Peggy Ornstein

A superficial investigation of girlie culture/princess phenomen. Not exactly earth-shattering for anyone who has thought about this stuff or read other feminist treatments of the topic. BUT, a good accessible primer that I would recommend to anyone interested in the topic.

4. Last Sacrifice by Richelle Mead

Final book in the Vampire Academy series. Good conclusion; although, a little bit too happily ever after in some respects. I enjoyed this series immensely though and am looking forward to her future series set in the same world.

5. Set This House in Order: A Romance of Souls by Matt Ruff

This is easily one of the best books I have read in a while with a really original premise. The 2 leads in the book have multiple personality disorder. At first, only one of them knows this, and he must help the other come to terms with her problems while also facing his own. This was a fascinating book.
post #66 of 110

The Mysterious Benedict Society, Stewart

 

 

Quote:
 Are you a gifted child looking for Special Opportunities?" This curious newspaper ad catches the eye of orphan Reynie Muldoon. After taking exams that test both mind and spirit, Reynie is selected along with four other contestants--Sticky Washington, a nervous child with a photographic memory; irrepressible Kate Weatherhill; and a tiny child who lives up to her name, Constance Contraire. The children soon learn they've been chosen by mysterious Mr. Benedict for an important mission: they are to infiltrate the isolated Learning Institute for the Very Enlightened, from which messages of distrust and compliance are being broadcast into the minds of the world's citizens. Debut novelist Stewart takes some familiar conventions--among them, an orphan struggling against evil forces (Harry Potter, anyone?)--and makes them his own. But like the Potter books, his story goes beyond mere adventures, delving into serious issues, such as the way sloganeering can undermine society--or control it. Through its interesting characters, the book also tackles personal concerns: abandonment, family, loyalty, and facing one's fears.

 

 

This has been a popular book in this thread for a while, and for good reason.  The characters are very enjoyable and fun, and their different methods for tackling their mission highlight their personalities.  Very enjoyable.

post #67 of 110

Welcome to more new faces! love.gif  And congrats KBond on the arrival of your son stork-boy.gif How exciting!!!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post

 



After a long hiatus, I'm back! My DS was born 12 days ago, and I'm settling back into the couch for nursing/sleeping/reading all day for at least the next 2 weeks. (my DD goes to preschool so it really is blissful.)

Books so far include:

1. Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve

A YA book set in a future of municipal Darwinism where the cities all move and eat each other. This is the first of a series and sets up future stories quite nicely. The premise of this one is boy discovers his hero is not all he thought he was while adventuring with mysterious girl who is trying to kill his hero. I liked it and will be reading the next books.

2. Messiah Node by Lydia Moorehouse

Sci-fi with cyber-punk overtones mixed with religion/angels. This is the 3rd book in the series. Quick read.

3. Cinderella Ate My Daughter by Peggy Ornstein

A superficial investigation of girlie culture/princess phenomen. Not exactly earth-shattering for anyone who has thought about this stuff or read other feminist treatments of the topic. BUT, a good accessible primer that I would recommend to anyone interested in the topic.

4. Last Sacrifice by Richelle Mead

Final book in the Vampire Academy series. Good conclusion; although, a little bit too happily ever after in some respects. I enjoyed this series immensely though and am looking forward to her future series set in the same world.

5. Set This House in Order: A Romance of Souls by Matt Ruff

This is easily one of the best books I have read in a while with a really original premise. The 2 leads in the book have multiple personality disorder. At first, only one of them knows this, and he must help the other come to terms with her problems while also facing his own. This was a fascinating book.


I have a ton of books to post, but I'm trying to work at the office and also get my taxes ready to be filed.  lol.gif So, I'll be back in a couple days!  Happy Valentine's Day everyone!

post #68 of 110

congrats on your little one, kbond!

 

i have a stack of books next to the bed, but keep falling asleep when i'm reading.  *sigh*  cursed day job wearing me out.  i'm working on Little Bee and Finding Nouf.

 

most recent read was The Summer without Men by Siri Hustvedt, for a review.  it was disappointing (always the worst sorts of reviews to write).  i had no sympathy for the protagonist, a stuck up, pompous intellectual who spoke in overused phrases and looked down her nose at everyone.  i've never read the writer's other books, and she seems to get lots of good reviews?  either just not my taste, or the others are much better.

post #69 of 110
Thread Starter 

Oh my gosh, Kbond. Congratulations!!!!!

post #70 of 110
Thread Starter 

Kofduke . . . I wasn't impressed by the Scottoline book that I read but I saw that others on amazon.com had the similar opinion that her other books are much better so I won't give up on her yet.

post #71 of 110
Thread Starter 

Grace and the Terrible Tutu

 

Very cute chapter book that fans of Clementine, etc. would like.

post #72 of 110

Thanks for the well-wishes and congratulations. It's been a lot of fun having an infant again. If only my 2 year old would stop driving me crazy.

 

1. Predator's Gold (Hungry Cities #2) by Philip Reeve

 

The sequel to Mortal Engines. This book was a bit stronger in terms of technicalities of writing, and the plot was a bit tighter as well. Just as enjoyable as the first one, and I'm having fun reading this series. I imagine I would love this series too if I were an 8-11 year old boy.

post #73 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post




How's the Agatha Christie?  I have her on my list.  I've never read any of her books!  I'm sure I'll like them though.  I'm sadly lacking in my classics repertoire.


FM, I've always been a Christie fan.  I'm re-reading a bunch and discovering some new ones as part of this challenge.  I think I'd recommend The Murder of Roger Ackroyd or Then There Were None if you are looking for good starters.

 

 

So far in February:

 

20. Blackout by Connie Willis
21.Ordeal by Innocence by Agatha Christie
22. Toto's Tale by K.D. Hays & Meg Weidman
23. Funerals Are Fatal by Agatha Christie
24. The Language Instinct by Steven Pinker

post #74 of 110

Congratulations Kbond!!!

post #75 of 110

The Help on audio.  enjoyed it very much.  i'm glad i had the audio, because sometimes books written in multiple voices get on my nerves.  in this case, it was lovely, hearing 3 different voices reading.  i felt like i was right there in Mississippi, and i was sorry to see it end.

post #76 of 110

January

1. Only Son - Kevin O'Brien

2. Planning To Live - Heather Wardell

3. The 7 Wonders That Will Change Your Life - Glenn Beck/ Keith Ablow

4. Life, Love and a Polar Bear Tatoo - Heather Wardell

5. Carved In Bone - Jefferson Bass

February

6. Thirteen Reasons Why- Jay Asher 

7. The Abstinence Teacher- Tom Perrotta

8. One Fine Day Your're Gonna Die- Gail Bowen  (90 pgs)

9. Term Limits - Vince Flynn

 10. Scars - Cheryl Rainfield

 

I have some on Nook that are partially finished and a couple in my 'subbing' bag again that are partially done.

post #77 of 110

Okay, I had a really nice post and it errored out for some reason, saying I did not have permission to post.  Anyway, thanks Bufo for the Agatha Christie advice!

 

And I also said I just finished changing over my books from Visual Bookshelf to Goodreads.  I really like Goodreads a lot better!  And my list of to-read books is HUGE.  And I really want to deviate from my finish the closet pile goal b/c some of the books sound so good! 

post #78 of 110

Saving Fish From Drowning, Tan

 

 

 

Quote:
San Francisco socialite and art-world doyenne Bibi Chen has planned the vacation of a lifetime along the notorious Burma Road for 12 of her dearest friends. Violently murdered days before takeoff, she's reduced to watching her friends bumble through their travels from the remove of the spirit world. Making the best of it, the 11 friends who aren't hung over depart their Myanmar resort on Christmas morning to boat across a misty lake—and vanish. The tourists find themselves trapped in jungle-covered mountains, held by a refugee tribe that believes Rupert, the group's surly teenager, is the reincarnation of their god Younger White Brother, come to save them from the unstable, militaristic Myanmar government. Tan's travelers, who range from a neurotic hypochondriac to the debonair, self-involved host of a show called The Fido Files, fight and flirt among themselves. While ensemble casting precludes the intimacy that characterizes Tan's mother-daughter stories, the book branches out with a broad plot and dynamic digressions. 

 

Lots of bad reviews out there for this book, but I have to say I enjoyed the audiobook.  Bibi's character is intruiging -- almost as if during the afterlife she begins to gain a deeper understanding of herself -- and I found the setting to be very well drawn.

post #79 of 110
Thread Starter 

I'm thinking of getting an ereader and am leaning toward the Kindle. But those of you that have one-- do you like it? Is it like reading on a computer or like reading a book? Does anyone have a suggestion of which one is best and why???

post #80 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

I'm thinking of getting an ereader and am leaning toward the Kindle. But those of you that have one-- do you like it? Is it like reading on a computer or like reading a book? Does anyone have a suggestion of which one is best and why???


I LOVE my Kindle. To me, the experience is much more like reading a book than reading on a computer screen. The e-ink screen is even easier on the eyes than paper and I adore the ability to cart a library to all of the kid activities. Amazon customer service has gone above and beyond with the Kindle, too.

 

Now, there is one drawback to the Kindle. If your library supports e-books, you can't read them on the Kindle. E-pub is a format that works for Sony, Kobo, Nook, but not Kindle. That said, I have found no shortage of free books for the Kindle. They are everywhere. 

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