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January/February 2011 Book Challenge Thread - Page 5

post #81 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

I'm thinking of getting an ereader and am leaning toward the Kindle. But those of you that have one-- do you like it? Is it like reading on a computer or like reading a book? Does anyone have a suggestion of which one is best and why???



I like my NOOKCOLOR.  If you have a barnes and  noble near you definately stop in and play with the nooks.  Nook is able to support library loans (a huge selling point for me) and Kindle cant do that.  The color screen is also another huge selling point for me.  I love the NOOK, there are tons of free downloads on BN, they seem to change the freebies every few weeks.  My son loves it as well.  I still read traditional paper books and probably will for a long time but the convience of the e-reader is wonderful.  Oh forgot to mention Nook lets you share books, kindle doesnt let you do that.

post #82 of 110

The Kindle does support sharing now.  It works exactly the same as the Nook in that regard.

 

Honestly, I think that the Nook and the Kindle are both awesome devices and that you would love either one.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zebra15 View Post





I like my NOOKCOLOR.  If you have a barnes and  noble near you definately stop in and play with the nooks.  Nook is able to support library loans (a huge selling point for me) and Kindle cant do that.  The color screen is also another huge selling point for me.  I love the NOOK, there are tons of free downloads on BN, they seem to change the freebies every few weeks.  My son loves it as well.  I still read traditional paper books and probably will for a long time but the convience of the e-reader is wonderful.  Oh forgot to mention Nook lets you share books, kindle doesnt let you do that.

post #83 of 110
Thread Starter 

The Robber Bride by Margaret Atwood

 

Three women made the mistake of trusting beautiful Zenia and end up betrayed in the worst possible ways. When Zenia dies, they are able to move on . . . but then suddenly she's back. The story alternates between the story of each woman and from present to past. This was a quite different from Atwood's other futuristic writings and I had a hard time getting into it. But after about 100 pages, it started to click. While this is not my favorite of Atwood's books, it was enjoyable.

post #84 of 110
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the ereader comments. I'm actually going to B & N tomorrow for a signing of Wendelin Van Draanen's new book and will check them out while I'm there.

 

I'm also thinking of iPAD but they are so much more expensive . . .anyone have one of those??? 

post #85 of 110

25. Troubled Waters by Sharon Shinn
26. Cat Running by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
27.Dead until Dark by Charlaine Harris
28.Sleeping Murder by Agatha Christie

post #86 of 110

#2 Where the Heart Is by Billie Letts

I didn't expect to like this book at all, I'm not sure why, I think I was associating it with a Lifetime movie or something?  It was from my clean out the closet pile, actually almost all the books in this post are winky.gif  Anyway, the book wasn't as predictable and saccharine as I expected, I actually kind of enjoyed the coming of age the main character had.  Story starts out with a young pregnant woman traveling with her boyfriend across the country in his truck.  They stop at walmart and he deserts her there.  She lives there for a few months undiscovered.  The rest is about how she becomes part of this small town midwestern community.

 

#3 The Sea by John Banville

Enh, I skimmed to the end on this one.  It just never grabbed me. It's the story of a man looking back at his childhood memories of summers in a beach community and the friends he made, while simultaneously looking back on his relationship with his wife, who has just died of cancer.

 

#4 Open House by Elizabeth Berg

Another book read just b/c it's part of the pile and honestly, I feel the same about this one as I do the one above.  Enh.  Luckily, both of these books were short. Heh.  This one is about how a woman rediscovers herself when her husband leaves her.

 

#5 Little Bee by Chris Cleave

This is a Seattle Reads book, so I'm glad I read it.  The story was interesting, and I liked the way the author switched back and forth between two different narrators.  Something about the book could have had more depth of story or something though, while the subject matter was pretty heavy, I just felt like the author skimmed the surface of the characters and the story.  The story is about a woman from Africa who escaped violence there and ends up in England.  She's trying to find a couple who she met on the beach in Africa.

 

#6 The Four Agreements by Miguel Ruiz

Spiritual read about being true to yourself basically.  Good read, quick and easy to finish, somewhat less easy to implement.  If I remember correctly, the agreements are 1. be impeccable with your word, 2. don't take anything personally, 3. always do your best and....oops, I think I forgot the last one.  They all make sense though thumb.gif

 

#7 Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese

Really good read.  I read this for my book club.  The story was fascinating, and I enjoyed learning more about Ethiopia.  The characters were really well drawn and it was a nice thick book, so plenty of time to get wrapped up in what's happening.  It starts out in a Catholic "hospital" in Ethiopia in the 50'/60's and ends up following the lives of twins who are born and grow up there.  Lots of focus on things of a medical nature with the setting and all the doctors and nurses involved.  I loved this one.  Double thumbs up.

 

#8 A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton

Another closet pile book and I'd been avoiding it b/c I know a kid dies in it.  But it turns out that's only a small facet of the story.  It follows a family of four in a formerly rural community as some terrible things happen.  The story is told really well and the characters really grabbed me. 

 

 

Reading The Hummingbird's Daughter right now and starting Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.  Reading the 2nd Harry Potter and Little House in the Big Woods with DD.  Those are fun love.gif

post #87 of 110
Thread Starter 

Hey all . . . I went to B & N yesterday and checked out the Nook . . . looks like the b&w Nook is pretty much the same as a Kindle, but the benefit is that you can get eBooks from anywhere -- including the free library ones. The color Nook seems pretty similiar to an iPad. The guy was saying they are going to be getting a lot more Aps so it will be pretty much the same but for half the price. The only thing I didn't like was that it was more like a computer screen while the b&w was more like a book page . . . So no decision yet. I think the biggest question I have is will I like reading books on a screen and not holding the actual book in my hand.

post #88 of 110

The Nook doesn't impress me.  A friend has it and I did not like it.  I love my Kindle because to me, it is more like an actual book.  I love that it does not have a backlight so I can read it outside.  Mine also still shows pictures, and I don't really care for my pictures to be in color, so it is not really an issue for me. 

 

It is all going to come down to your own preference.  Does someone you know have a Kindle that you can look at?  I show mine to people all the time.  Good luck finding one you like!

I have no idea on the IPad, I don't have one of those and I have never seen one in person before, either.

post #89 of 110

The Day the Falls Stood Still, Buchanan

 

 

Quote:
 

1915. The dawn of the hydroelectric power era in Niagara Falls. Seventeen-year-old Bess Heath has led a sheltered existence as the youngest daughter of the director of the Niagara Power Company. After graduation day at her boarding school, she is impatient to return to her picturesque family home near Niagara Falls. But when she arrives, nothing is as she had left it. Her father has lost his job at the power company, her mother is reduced to taking in sewing from the society ladies she once entertained, and Isabel, her vivacious older sister, is a shadow of her former self. She has shut herself in her bedroom, barely eating--and harboring a secret.

The night of her return, Bess meets Tom Cole by chance on a trolley platform. She finds herself inexplicably drawn to him--against her family's strong objections. Rough-hewn and fearless, he lives off what the river provides and has an uncanny ability to predict the whims of the falls. His daring river rescues render him a local hero and cast him as a threat to the power companies that seek to harness the power of the falls for themselves. Bess is forced to make a painful choice between what she wants and what is best for her family and her future.  Set against the tumultuous backdrop of Niagara Falls, at a time when daredevils shot the river rapids in barrels and great industrial fortunes were made and lost as quickly as lives disappeared, The Day the Falls Stood Still is an intoxicating debut novel.

 

 

 

 

I really loved this novel.  My husband and I went to Niagara Falls last fall for our tenth wedding anniversary, and it was one of the most wonderful trips we've ever taken.  This book made me feel as if I were right there.  The characters were all so richly drawn -- Bess, Tom, and most of all the Niagara River.  Themes of compromise, family, and environmentalism were integrated into the story.

 

post #90 of 110
Thread Starter 

Thanks Purple Lotus . . . they told me that he nook black and white was like a Kindle and I did like that it didn't have the screen light . . . just looked like a book. But the color one you could go on the internet so that was kind of cool . . . I guess it depends to I just want an ereader or to I want something that does aps and stuff.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Purple*Lotus View Post

The Nook doesn't impress me.  A friend has it and I did not like it.  I love my Kindle because to me, it is more like an actual book.  I love that it does not have a backlight so I can read it outside.  Mine also still shows pictures, and I don't really care for my pictures to be in color, so it is not really an issue for me. 

 

It is all going to come down to your own preference.  Does someone you know have a Kindle that you can look at?  I show mine to people all the time.  Good luck finding one you like!

I have no idea on the IPad, I don't have one of those and I have never seen one in person before, either.

post #91 of 110
Thread Starter 

I Think I Love You by Allison Pearson

 

 

Having had a major crush on David Cassidy when I was in fifth grade, I ordered this book as soon as heard about it. The story is about about a group of Welsh girls who are David Cassidy obsessed. Two in particular Petra and Sharon feel like they know everything there is to know about him so when they have a chance to meet him by filling out the "Ultimate David Cassidy Quiz" they pore over it for weeks until they finally have every answer. Years later, when Petra's mom dies and Petra is going through Mom's papers, she discovers that she had actually one the contest!
 
While I love the premise for the book and Peason's writing is great, the book was actually pretty boring. The first half with the girls obsessing over David was the same thing over and over. The only interesting part were the sections about Billy, the writer impresonating David Cassidy for the fan magazine. When we fast forward to the present when Petra find the letter, I perked up expecting some action but the big David meet-up was a big let-down and even the potential attraction starting up between Petra and Billy didn't have enough spark to ignite my interest. I don't like posting negative reviews but this book really disappointed me.
post #92 of 110

I'm looking through you

 

 

Quote:
tells of growing up in a haunted house in Pennsylvania, where phantom footfalls and spectral mists were practically commonplace. This was a fitting-enough setting for young Boylan, then a boy who longed to become a girl. Back then I knew very little for certain about whatever it was that afflicted me, she writes. [I]n order to survive, I'd have to become something like a ghost myself, and keep the nature of my true self hidden. In 2006, years after her sex change, Boylan returned to her childhood home with a band of local ghostbusters as she struggled to reconcile with her past as James Boylan, as well as her memories of family members she'd loved and lost there.

 

 

I wasn't expecting the transgender aspect of this -- I was expecting a haunted house memoir.  Despite my different expectation, I really enjoyed the story -- Boylan is able to write humorously about difficult topics.

 

 

The Chocolate War, Cormier

 

 

Quote:
Does Jerry Renault dare to disturb the universe? You wouldn't think that his refusal to sell chocolates during his school's fundraiser would create such a stir, but it does; it's as if the whole school comes apart at the seams. To some, Jerry is a hero, but to others, he becomes a scapegoat--a target for their pent-up hatred. And Jerry? He's just trying to stand up for what he believes, but perhaps there is no way for him to escape becoming a pawn in this game of control; students are pitted against other students, fighting for honor--or are they fighting for their lives? In 1974, author Robert Cormier dared to disturb our universe when this book was first published. And now, with a new introduction by the celebrated author, The Chocolate War stands ready to shock a new group of teen readers.

 

 

Would love to use excerpts from this one for a guidance/bullying lesson...

post #93 of 110


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post

The Woman who Fell from the Sky: An American Journalist in Yemen by Jennifer Steil

 

this was an enjoyable and well-written travel memoir about the author's year working as editor of the Yemen Observer.  i learned a bit about Yemen, feel like i got a taste of what life is like there (to a degree) for ordinary Yemenis.  for example, imagine being a cfemale college graduate, aspiring journalist--but you can't go out after dark?  the women on staff are very resourceful.  there were parts about parties with the expat community that were less interesting for me--though for Steil they were a necessary escape from a very conservative culture and her crazy work schedule.  near the end of the book, she met her now-fiance; he was already married, and i found that reading about their affair made me squirmy.  i would have liked a bit more Yemeni history--or maybe she has just gotten me interested.

 

on my commute i'm listening to The Help by Kathryn Stockett. i was # 25 on the library list.


i posted a bit ago about Steil's book.  wanted to give the link to my full review in case anyone was interested, curious, or willing to read and comment.

 

as for The Help, i'm very glad i had the audio.  with the book told in 3 voices, actually hearing 3 different voices was wonderful (and my mental Bostonian voice would not read Mississippi as well).  i was sorry to see it end, and really enjoyed it.  now i need another audio idea, so my commute is not dreadful again.

 

just started The Butterfly Mosque which i am loving so far.

post #94 of 110

So far this month I have read Room, and tonight I should finish Water for Elephants.

 

Any suggestions for what I should read next?

post #95 of 110
Thread Starter 


Have you read The Forgotten Garden?? I remember really liking that one.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Purple*Lotus View Post

So far this month I have read Room, and tonight I should finish Water for Elephants.

 

Any suggestions for what I should read next?

post #96 of 110
Thread Starter 

The Running Dream by Wendelin Van Draanen

 

My daughter and I went to the book signing for this book by the author of Flipped (and many others). My 12 yo read it in 2 nights and I read it in the next 3. Very moving story about a teen track star who is in an accident and has to have her leg amputated. 

post #97 of 110

 

Shadowfever by Karen Marie Moning 

The last and final book of the the Darkfever series  by Karen Marie Moning  http://www.karenmoning.com/kmm/

This is has got to be the most politically incorrect series I’ve read!    Most of the characters are not even really likeable, but it is SO much fun!  This series is my guilty pleasure!       

What can I say?   These books are addicting and thoroughly enjoyable in the way that the Twilight series for me was. I just reread the first 4 because the 5th only just came out last month.   Because 4th book, Dreamfever had such a cliff hanger ending, with great anticipation I waited for the 5th and final book of this series to come out.  All of you who start the series now are very lucky because you’ll be able to read them straight through!   Here is the order of the series:

1.Darkfever

2.Bloodfever

3.Faefever

4.Dreamfever

5.Shadowfever

post #98 of 110

I would like to read 50 books this year. I am so bad at tracking what I have read, so I am joining this thread again and also posting on face book.

 

So far since January 2011:

 

1) A Falcon for a Queen, Catherine Gaskin

2) Peace Like a River Leif Engel

3) Life of Pi by Yann Martel

4) The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers

5) Little Bee Chris Cleave

6) The Lost Gate, Orson Scott Card

7) Gail Carriger does some great steam punk, "Blameless" was recent read

 

Reading four books right now:

 

The Places that scare you, Pema Chodron

The Zoo Keeper's Wife, Diane Ackerman

In the Bleak Midwinter, Julia Spencer-Fleming

Guardian Of The Darkness (Moribito) by Nahoko Uehashi with the kids

 

 

Various kids books as well, but I will not be counting them unless they are chapter books of a decent size.

post #99 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by kofduke View Post

I'm looking through you

 

 

 

 

I wasn't expecting the transgender aspect of this -- I was expecting a haunted house memoir.  Despite my different expectation, I really enjoyed the story -- Boylan is able to write humorously about difficult topics.

 

 

The Chocolate War, Cormier

 

 

 

 

Would love to use excerpts from this one for a guidance/bullying lesson...


Oh, the Chocolate War sounds interesting!  I'm adding that to my list thumb.gif

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post


 


i posted a bit ago about Steil's book.  wanted to give the link to my full review in case anyone was interested, curious, or willing to read and comment.

 

as for The Help, i'm very glad i had the audio.  with the book told in 3 voices, actually hearing 3 different voices was wonderful (and my mental Bostonian voice would not read Mississippi as well).  i was sorry to see it end, and really enjoyed it.  now i need another audio idea, so my commute is not dreadful again.

 

just started The Butterfly Mosque which i am loving so far.


I usually only listen to kid's books on audio....lol.gif  I can tell you I enjoyed hearing Anne of Green Gables on audio.  And the first 2 Harry Potters. lol.gif  It's all about the narrator isn't it? 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Purple*Lotus View Post

So far this month I have read Room, and tonight I should finish Water for Elephants.

 

Any suggestions for what I should read next?



I really loved Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.  Just finished that one.  Cutting for Stone was great too.  Those are my 2 faves so far this year.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jalilah View Post

 

Shadowfever by Karen Marie Moning 

The last and final book of the the Darkfever series  by Karen Marie Moning  http://www.karenmoning.com/kmm/

This is has got to be the most politically incorrect series I’ve read!    Most of the characters are not even really likeable, but it is SO much fun!  This series is my guilty pleasure!       

What can I say?   These books are addicting and thoroughly enjoyable in the way that the Twilight series for me was. I just reread the first 4 because the 5th only just came out last month.   Because 4th book, Dreamfever had such a cliff hanger ending, with great anticipation I waited for the 5th and final book of this series to come out.  All of you who start the series now are very lucky because you’ll be able to read them straight through!   Here is the order of the series:

1.Darkfever

2.Bloodfever

3.Faefever

4.Dreamfever

5.Shadowfever


What are those about?  Sounds intriguing.....

 

 

 

Welcome Igraine!

post #100 of 110

I haven't been posting my books lately, but here are my favorites I have read so far this year.

 

7.  The Enchanted Places by Christopher Milne

 

This was written by the real life Christopher Robin whose dad wrote the Pooh series. The books were inspired by Christopher and his adventures roaming around the woods with his stuffed animals.  Surprisingly, Christopher Milne doesn't see his childhood as such a magical time and he spent most of his time with his nanny.  It was interesting reading about how he felt a little bitter about his dad making a caricature of him.  Kind of sheds a different light on those innocent Pooh stories.

 

11.  Room by Emma Donoghue

 

This has been reviewed on here a lot and I found it just as fascinating as everyone else.  I thought the little boy's development and his manner of speaking and thinking about the world were spot on.  It was amazing how the author was able to get inside a child's mind to see how they might view the world after only living in a shed the first five years of his life.   

 

16.  Ape House by Sara Gruen

 

A new book written by the author of Water for Elephants.  It's not as good as Water for Elephants, but still stands on its own.  It follows a group of Bonobos apes as they are kidnapped from the research facility they live in and made into a spectacle on a live reality show. 

 

23.  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

 

All of the Borders bookstores in my area are closing and this is one of many books I picked up from there.  I love Roald Dahl and hadn't read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory yet.  It's a sweet, funny story.

 

24.  Left Neglected by Lisa Genova

 

This is my favorite book I have read so far this year.  It's about a woman at the top of her career who is also juggling three kids.  She is completely swamped and always multitasking, including texting, emailing and making phone calls in the car.  She gets into a terrible car accident and suffers brain damage that results in something called Left Neglect.  She has no concept of left.  She isn't aware of the left side of her body, cannot look to her left and does not see anything that's on her left, only eats the food of the right side of her plate, only reads the words on the right side of the page, etc. 

 

This book was fascinating and although I have never heard of such a disease, it's common and very real.  I enjoyed reading how the woman coped with the disease and saw her life for what it was and what it could be after the accident forced her to slow down.  I usually don't like contemporary fiction but this had just the right twist to make it interesting.  I highly recommend this one.

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