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Now THIS is de-cluttered... - Page 4

post #61 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peppermint Leaf View Post

I went back and checked ---she says she takes the jars with her to the super market :-)


I still don't get that. I stock up on stuff before I run out. To use her same jars, she would have to totally run out of something to be able to go back and fill up the jar again. No wonder they need a second car for her errands!
post #62 of 97

it's really not a big deal. you just bring that jar when you run out. on bike. and i'm not organized AT ALL.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Peppermint Leaf View Post

I went back and checked ---she says she takes the jars with her to the super market :-)




I still don't get that. I stock up on stuff before I run out. To use her same jars, she would have to totally run out of something to be able to go back and fill up the jar again. No wonder they need a second car for her errands!
post #63 of 97

What do they do with leftover food that's gone bad, etc?

post #64 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
I still don't get that. I stock up on stuff before I run out. To use her same jars, she would have to totally run out of something to be able to go back and fill up the jar again. No wonder they need a second car for her errands!

I would imagine they might have one or two extra jars that they use for shopping and then transfer to the storage jar when they return home.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View PostWhat do they do with leftover food that's gone bad, etc?


compost, I would presume...

 

We will never get to the point of zero waste, though I admire it immensely. We do compost all vegetable, dairy and egg products. We don't eat a ton of meat, and what little we do usually gets fed to the dog as treats when there are leftovers.

 

 

post #65 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by spedteacher30 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
I still don't get that. I stock up on stuff before I run out. To use her same jars, she would have to totally run out of something to be able to go back and fill up the jar again. No wonder they need a second car for her errands!

I would imagine they might have one or two extra jars that they use for shopping and then transfer to the storage jar when they return home.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View PostWhat do they do with leftover food that's gone bad, etc?


compost, I would presume...

 

We will never get to the point of zero waste, though I admire it immensely. We do compost all vegetable, dairy and egg products. We don't eat a ton of meat, and what little we do usually gets fed to the dog as treats when there are leftovers.

 

 



But milk and meats cant go in the compost. I compost whatever I can but some still goes in the trash.

 

I'm guessing they dont' have a dog becuase there's waste associated with taht too...

post #66 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by spedteacher30 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
I still don't get that. I stock up on stuff before I run out. To use her same jars, she would have to totally run out of something to be able to go back and fill up the jar again. No wonder they need a second car for her errands!

I would imagine they might have one or two extra jars that they use for shopping and then transfer to the storage jar when they return home.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View PostWhat do they do with leftover food that's gone bad, etc?


compost, I would presume...

 

We will never get to the point of zero waste, though I admire it immensely. We do compost all vegetable, dairy and egg products. We don't eat a ton of meat, and what little we do usually gets fed to the dog as treats when there are leftovers.

 

 



But milk and meats cant go in the compost. I compost whatever I can but some still goes in the trash.

 

I'm guessing they dont' have a dog becuase there's waste associated with taht too...

 

Mill Valley (like its neighbor San Francisco) composts food waste.  So meat and pretty much everything else can go into compost there.
 

post #67 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chamomile Girl View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by spedteacher30 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
I still don't get that. I stock up on stuff before I run out. To use her same jars, she would have to totally run out of something to be able to go back and fill up the jar again. No wonder they need a second car for her errands!

I would imagine they might have one or two extra jars that they use for shopping and then transfer to the storage jar when they return home.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View PostWhat do they do with leftover food that's gone bad, etc?


compost, I would presume...

 

We will never get to the point of zero waste, though I admire it immensely. We do compost all vegetable, dairy and egg products. We don't eat a ton of meat, and what little we do usually gets fed to the dog as treats when there are leftovers.

 

 



But milk and meats cant go in the compost. I compost whatever I can but some still goes in the trash.

 

I'm guessing they dont' have a dog becuase there's waste associated with taht too...

 

Mill Valley (like its neighbor San Francisco) composts food waste.  So meat and pretty much everything else can go into compost there.
 



 I wish we had that here! Food in the trash stinks up teh kitchen. Its freezing out so I've been putting old food in a bag outside and it freezes quickly but stray cats still try to get at it...

post #68 of 97
post #69 of 97
Yes! I could look through Sara's house pics all day!
post #70 of 97

a bokashi bin is also a possibility for meat waste and some dairy waste (not milk because it is too wet, but it can handle cheese). it ferments the stuff first, then you can compost it like normal compost. it doesn't require a hot compost. 

post #71 of 97

I put (some) meat waste out for the crows. Does anyone else (besides me and my mom and grandmom) do this?

post #72 of 97

That was a good article, thanks for sharing!

post #73 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by ASusan View Post

I put (some) meat waste out for the crows. Does anyone else (besides me and my mom and grandmom) do this?



Not many crows out in the minus 30. Maybe stray cats.

post #74 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by ASusan View Post

I put (some) meat waste out for the crows. Does anyone else (besides me and my mom and grandmom) do this?



We have chickens and put all of our food scraps that don't go into compost (and aren't chicken!) out for them.

post #75 of 97

You can compost meat, sure you can. You do risk having animals come rummage through your pile though.

 

The Humanure Handbook by Joseph Jenkins says that if you compost humanure, the pile gets very hot and also naturally deters rather than attracts animals, and he composts all meat and bones with no problem. The bones take a long time to decompose so when you have a finished batch you'll probably find bones in it, but that's no problem.

post #76 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by laohaire View Post

You can compost meat, sure you can. You do risk having animals come rummage through your pile though.

 

The Humanure Handbook by Joseph Jenkins says that if you compost humanure, the pile gets very hot and also naturally deters rather than attracts animals, and he composts all meat and bones with no problem. The bones take a long time to decompose so when you have a finished batch you'll probably find bones in it, but that's no problem.


K so I googled humanure becuase I've never heard of it. Sounds interesting. The thing that makes it seem unfeasible is it takes longer to compost this way. 1 to 2 years I think it said? And there has to be a certain amount of time between the last addition of humanure and the time you use it. I only have one of those black bins... I don't have tons and tons of space to store several years worth... I mean I could probably add some this year and use it next year... But that would only allow a few months worth of adding it. Kwim?

I dunno. Can you explain it more? It says there are specific regulations to ensure all pathogens are killed....
 

post #77 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View Post


K so I googled humanure becuase I've never heard of it. Sounds interesting. The thing that makes it seem unfeasible is it takes longer to compost this way. 1 to 2 years I think it said? And there has to be a certain amount of time between the last addition of humanure and the time you use it. I only have one of those black bins... I don't have tons and tons of space to store several years worth... I mean I could probably add some this year and use it next year... But that would only allow a few months worth of adding it. Kwim?

I dunno. Can you explain it more? It says there are specific regulations to ensure all pathogens are killed....
 


As a fellow family cloth user, welcome to the idea of humanure composting!

 

Disclaimer: I don't do it. Not yet. But I am considering it.

 

But I do recommend the book, check it out.

 

Yes, Joseph Jenkins recommends having a rotating system of compost with 2 piles. One pile (Pile A) sits and ages. The other (Pile B), you add to all year. Then when the year is up, you harvest Pile A and let Pile B sit and age. You start creating a new pile where you harvested Pile A.

 

Yes, that requires a bit of space - not tons, but certainly isn't something you can do in an apartment or anything. 

 

Some people choose to let their piles age 2 years. Joseph Jenkins does not, but he says if you are concerned and plan to use the compost on food crops, it's certainly something you can do. If that is the case, you can have 3 piles. But anyway, if you have one dedicated pile, you only need twice the space - which may be too much for some, but it's not a crazy amount of space, like needing 10 piles or something.

 

Since reading his book, I've upgraded my compost heap from a small bin to a 4 foot diameter chicken wire pile (and I have a second length of chicken wire in my basement for when I've filled the first). But I haven't put anything, er, "personal" in the pile yet, just the usual leaves and kitchen wastes. I'm totally sold on the method, though.

post #78 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by laohaire View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by bcblondie View Post


K so I googled humanure becuase I've never heard of it. Sounds interesting. The thing that makes it seem unfeasible is it takes longer to compost this way. 1 to 2 years I think it said? And there has to be a certain amount of time between the last addition of humanure and the time you use it. I only have one of those black bins... I don't have tons and tons of space to store several years worth... I mean I could probably add some this year and use it next year... But that would only allow a few months worth of adding it. Kwim?

I dunno. Can you explain it more? It says there are specific regulations to ensure all pathogens are killed....
 


As a fellow family cloth user, welcome to the idea of humanure composting!

 

Disclaimer: I don't do it. Not yet. But I am considering it.

 

But I do recommend the book, check it out.

 

Yes, Joseph Jenkins recommends having a rotating system of compost with 2 piles. One pile (Pile A) sits and ages. The other (Pile B), you add to all year. Then when the year is up, you harvest Pile A and let Pile B sit and age. You start creating a new pile where you harvested Pile A.

 

Yes, that requires a bit of space - not tons, but certainly isn't something you can do in an apartment or anything. 

 

Some people choose to let their piles age 2 years. Joseph Jenkins does not, but he says if you are concerned and plan to use the compost on food crops, it's certainly something you can do. If that is the case, you can have 3 piles. But anyway, if you have one dedicated pile, you only need twice the space - which may be too much for some, but it's not a crazy amount of space, like needing 10 piles or something.

 

Since reading his book, I've upgraded my compost heap from a small bin to a 4 foot diameter chicken wire pile (and I have a second length of chicken wire in my basement for when I've filled the first). But I haven't put anything, er, "personal" in the pile yet, just the usual leaves and kitchen wastes. I'm totally sold on the method, though.



Sounds very interesting! I love that I'd be able to do something with DS's poopy diapers. Seems stupid to use a cloth diaper and then have to flush the toilet lol. (although I know you are suposed to dump the poop with sposies too)

2 questions. How do they suggest you "collect" the humanure?

Can you just assume that if it's been aging for a year that all pathogens are dead?

 

ETA. We miiiight be able to fit a second bin. The one we have is between the shed and the fence, so we could potentially use the farther away one as the aging one if we can't sneak past. If we CAN squeeze past the first one then no worries.

post #79 of 97

Since we're kind of taking this thread off topic, I will bump up a thread in The Mindful Home for you!

post #80 of 97

Back on topic, I have to say that we don't have many physical books in our house.  But I do have tons of books and love to read, they are all stored handily on my e-reader and I can take my entire library with me wherever I go and it takes up less space than a paperback book!  that is one way to have books without actually having them take up space.

 

And used furniture/clothes, etc... I can't do it.  I just can't.  I know it is better, and I used to be fine with secondhand stuff.  Until someone I know got bedbugs from bringing 2nd hand stuff into their house.  Now, anything second hand just icks me out.  Especially since I know thta this person has donated stuff to the second hand shop while she still had the problem.  So yeah, no second hand for me.  And I realize that we could get bedbugs anywhere, but it's not as likely.

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