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Now THIS is de-cluttered... - Page 5

post #81 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingAnonymous View Post

I still like this home a lot better: http://www.flickr.com/photos/happyjanssens/sets/72157600025082938/with/435508468/



I am in love with this house!!!!!  It's exactly my taste too!!!

post #82 of 97

I've been looking at Bea's Zero-Waste Home blog and it's quite inspiring.  She has a ton of great ideas on there for reducing waste and streamlining the home.

 

She also mentions on the blog that the white living room furniture and the Le Parfait jars were all bought second-hand, since a few PPs were questioning whether they were new or not.

post #83 of 97

I too, have been reading her blog and find many aspects of it inspiring.  It definitely clarifies quite a lot of the questions that have been brought up in this thread, but also reinforces some of the negative points that have been brought up.

 

For instance, they do leave some trash behind in the stores.  She talked of buying a new pair of shoes and leaving the shoe box in the store.  Also, she said she buys her milk in reusable glass jars but that the lids are recyclable plastic.  The expectation is that she just return the jar, but she returns the jar and lid, to reinforce to the company that they need to think of lid alternatives.  Well, I buy my milk in the same way, and I know that the vendor actually does a secondary rinse of the jars before returning them to the creamery.  I'm sure that Whole Foods or whoever she is buying the milk from probably tosses the plastic lids for her, and they don't make it back to the creamery and her point isn't made.  She still generated trash, someone else is putting it in the landfill/ recycling for her.

 

I don't recall reading that the couch and furniture is second hand, although *most* of the jars are.

 

While I understand that her family has taken the last 3 years to get to where they are and it wasn't an overnight change, I also recognize that their life isn't realistic for many families.  She lives in a very progressive area where the are quite a few stores that sell a large assortment of goods in bulk and sell alternatives to mainstream products.  Many families don't have those kinds of resources.

post #84 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by FillingMyQuiver View Post

I don't recall reading that the couch and furniture is second hand, although *most* of the jars are.


The furniture was mentioned in this article: http://www.marinij.com/millvalley/ci_14933605

 

It's not really worth getting into an argument about, I was just saying that the blog had lots of great ideas.  I know there are some times that I don't know if x, y or z is the most sustainable choice, and it seems that she's done a ton of research along those lines.  It's a good read if anyone is looking for some new ideas: http://zerowastehome.blogspot.com/

post #85 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogiemonster View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by FillingMyQuiver View Post

I don't recall reading that the couch and furniture is second hand, although *most* of the jars are.


The furniture was mentioned in this article: http://www.marinij.com/millvalley/ci_14933605

 

It's not really worth getting into an argument about, I was just saying that the blog had lots of great ideas.  I know there are some times that I don't know if x, y or z is the most sustainable choice, and it seems that she's done a ton of research along those lines.  It's a good read if anyone is looking for some new ideas: http://zerowastehome.blogspot.com/


I hope you don't think I was trying to argue, I'm sorry if I came across that way.  I was just mentioning that her blog didn't say anything about the furniture being second hand, but I'm very glad it is.  I admire her and her family for all of the things they're doing, I just get the impression (from reading some of the comments on her blog) that she really thinks that *most* people can live this way.  I came away from reading her blog last night with a number of ideas that I can implement in my own family, but I also recognize that being a homeschooling family with 4 (soon to be 5) children is different than her family.

 

One of the things, for instance, that I was curious about, is their source of meat.  Just b/c they're buying meat at WF doesn't mean it's from a clean source, I'm sure some CAFOs supply WF.  Doesn't that change her footprint?  Which is the better of the 2 evils, choosing a clean, grass fed source of meat that sustainably manages their farm (as my family has found) but packages their meat in vacuum sealed packages, OR CAFO meat that is packaged in glass jars??  I just don't feel that everything is as cut and dry as she makes it out to be.

post #86 of 97

Ugh. I just read her blog, and while there were some cool ideas, I found her attitude to be SO smug and holier-than-thou in many posts. It completely turned me off. I also think imposing such a strict regime for children (for lack of a better word), no matter what it is, is unhealthy but hey...it's their life.

post #87 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingAnonymous View Post

I still like this home a lot better: http://www.flickr.com/photos/happyjanssens/sets/72157600025082938/with/435508468/



Me, too!  Love her style.  Haven't they moved on to another space now?

 

There are many good ideas in the Sunset article, but I just find it extreme and unrealistic for many.  I also don't find their space inviting or warm at all.

post #88 of 97



Yeah this!   Some of it I'm assuming in her 'Frenchness' coming through. I've known several French folks in my lifetime, and a bit of that smugness is just being French IMO. A real cultural thing.  But, that aside, her attitude towards her husband....awful!  She chides him like a child in the blog for accepting a bottle of water!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tumble Bumbles View Post

Ugh. I just read her blog, and while there were some cool ideas, I found her attitude to be SO smug and holier-than-thou in many posts. It completely turned me off. I also think imposing such a strict regime for children (for lack of a better word), no matter what it is, is unhealthy but hey...it's their life.

post #89 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupialmom View Post

 

Hankerchief are not always better. They can actually cause more germs and waste water to wash them -- now I am for using washable butt wipes (which they don't use) but tissues are generally one use so you are not reputting germs on your face or sharing it with others.

Unless you suffer from hay fever, dust allergies, pet dander allergies, or have problems with sudden changes in temperature. There are lots and lots of reasons to have a runny nose that have nothing to do with germs.

 

And 50 handkerchiefs take up considerably less room in the washer than one towel. If a family does at least one regular load of laundry a week they aren't going to do any more laundry if they add in handkerchiefs.

 

Mind you, paper tissues filled with lotion are the best things ever for colds. (Second best is a big stash of handkerchiefs and some coconut oil, but it always feels so wrong to toss them in the laundry (no different in terms of germ exposure than tossing tissues in the trash, actually better around here because laundry happens more often than the trash goes out) after a single use.)

post #90 of 97

For me the big thing that bugs me is that they aren't actually zero waste, they are simply pawning it off.  So it feels hypocritical to me.

 

Past that, I think the lifestyle choices are to each their own. :)  I'm terribly thrilled with my pictures on the walls.

post #91 of 97

I completely agree. I couldn't stand that.

 

And "Memories get stale when photos are displayed for too long" I disagree. I love pictures of my kids and artwork that they've done.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by freestylemama View Post

I think it's a little fake. Sure, there's no waste now, but how much was tossed to get to that point?  Everything looked new.  Why weren't they using old food jars instead of the matching jars in the pantry, you know? 

 

The concept is awesome, but it's too staged for my liking.  It also seems a little joyless.  I like art and books and things, and you can buy these things used and make art yourself. 

 

I'm not an eco-saint, but I think this seems more like a show house/project than a replicable way of living.  I'm a "both" "and" kind of gal though. 

post #92 of 97

Yeah, I was irked at the reference that they send the little plastic strip back to Netflex. That's making it somebody else's problem.

 

See, I find that whenever somebody declares themselves to following a relatively strict lifestyle, like Zero Impact Man, the couple who did the year of local food, or even vegans, people come out in hordes to throw stones and call them hypocrites by "catching" them in things like "you're vegan but bugs and worms were killed to make your potatoes" or whatever. That annoys me. I try to live responsibly and I can only applaud someone who take it to the next level. I don't feel compelled to say SEE!!!! They DO have waste!!!! (And yes, of course they do, I could come up with a huge list of things, starting with the REST of the envelope that goes back to Netflix which probably isn't recycled or composted). But all the same, that bit about the Netflix strip annoyed me, not because it is evidence that they DO have a little waste, but because they pawned it off.

post #93 of 97

I love the other place that was quoted-the small apartment. So homey and inspiring!

post #94 of 97

I wasn't reacting so much to the zero waste point, but more so the 'super control' point. It's one thing to be vegan, to eat local, etc. But her way of living encompasses everything from food to play to decorating one's area. And this control extends into her kids' lives. It's one thing to raise one's kids as vegans/locavores/low impact, etc. But for her, it seems that she's stripped a lot of ways for her kids to have control over their own environment. For example, for her, photos make memories stale. What about her sons? Maybe they'd like to put up pictures. Maybe they'd like to have a few more toys. Or a few more clothes.

 

It's an extreme in the sense that everyone else in the house has to follow these incredibly strict rules that encompass everything. It almost feels like there is no breathing room. And the lack of 'decoration' (colors, plants, whatever) is also odd for me. I'm not saying to clutter things up, but it seems like almost anyone can move in there, like a sterile hospital room.

 

Ami

post #95 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTA Mom View Post

I wasn't reacting so much to the zero waste point, but more so the 'super control' point. It's one thing to be vegan, to eat local, etc. But her way of living encompasses everything from food to play to decorating one's area. And this control extends into her kids' lives. It's one thing to raise one's kids as vegans/locavores/low impact, etc. But for her, it seems that she's stripped a lot of ways for her kids to have control over their own environment. For example, for her, photos make memories stale. What about her sons? Maybe they'd like to put up pictures. Maybe they'd like to have a few more toys. Or a few more clothes.

 

It's an extreme in the sense that everyone else in the house has to follow these incredibly strict rules that encompass everything. It almost feels like there is no breathing room. And the lack of 'decoration' (colors, plants, whatever) is also odd for me. I'm not saying to clutter things up, but it seems like almost anyone can move in there, like a sterile hospital room.

 

Ami



Ami, I wasn't sure if you thought my pet peeve about people throwing stones at people who follow a strict path was a response to you, it wasnt, it was just a general comment to offset my annoyance about the Netflix tab. I didn't want it to sound like a little strip of plastic made me think the whole low impact exercise was pointless. I think that whatever we can do makes it worthwhile. But anyway, it wasn't a reply to you or anyone else in the thread.

 

I agree with you that a home should be a home, even if low impact and uncluttered, and the home "belongs" to the children as well. It's not that I think children get to decorate the home democratically (heh, my DD will have her own house someday and that will be her turn to choose colors and themes in the kitchen and living room!) but it's almost as if this family is attempting to erase the very existence of its inhabitants. 

post #96 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by laohaire View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by JTA Mom View Post

I wasn't reacting so much to the zero waste point, but more so the 'super control' point. It's one thing to be vegan, to eat local, etc. But her way of living encompasses everything from food to play to decorating one's area. And this control extends into her kids' lives. It's one thing to raise one's kids as vegans/locavores/low impact, etc. But for her, it seems that she's stripped a lot of ways for her kids to have control over their own environment. For example, for her, photos make memories stale. What about her sons? Maybe they'd like to put up pictures. Maybe they'd like to have a few more toys. Or a few more clothes.

 

It's an extreme in the sense that everyone else in the house has to follow these incredibly strict rules that encompass everything. It almost feels like there is no breathing room. And the lack of 'decoration' (colors, plants, whatever) is also odd for me. I'm not saying to clutter things up, but it seems like almost anyone can move in there, like a sterile hospital room.

 

Ami



Ami, I wasn't sure if you thought my pet peeve about people throwing stones at people who follow a strict path was a response to you, it wasnt, it was just a general comment to offset my annoyance about the Netflix tab. I didn't want it to sound like a little strip of plastic made me think the whole low impact exercise was pointless. I think that whatever we can do makes it worthwhile. But anyway, it wasn't a reply to you or anyone else in the thread.

 

I agree with you that a home should be a home, even if low impact and uncluttered, and the home "belongs" to the children as well. It's not that I think children get to decorate the home democratically (heh, my DD will have her own house someday and that will be her turn to choose colors and themes in the kitchen and living room!) but it's almost as if this family is attempting to erase the very existence of its inhabitants. 

 

I wasn't responding to your post in particular. :) I was thinking about why people reacted so negatively to this article to the extent of pointing out the netflix strip. And I really think it boils down to what you said in the bolded. I also don't give ds equal decoration control (dinosaurs and robots are so not my taste, lol), but it seems like she doesn't allow her kids any control. In any area. Food is controlled to reduce waste. Okay. Now toys are reduced. Photos are reduced. Clothes are reduced. Personal grooming items are reduced. And on and on it goes.

 

I wonder if it is healthy to have that much control over one's children/spouse. Ds is only three, but I couldn't imagine severely limiting his toys that way. He is old enough to say that he wants certain things (like legos--they are everywhere!!!).  He makes drawings that he wants put up on the fridge. Somehow I'm not sure if that would fly in her house. And I find that creepy. If her idea of 'zero waste' looks like the way she is living, and since it is implied to be the 'best' way, well, then, I don't want to live that way. Maybe people are reacting to that underlying message. Or I could be wrong. Trying to think about things outside of the concrete realities.

 

Ami
 

post #97 of 97

Haven't read the entire thread- but I agree with lots of the PP's in that the space just looked sterile to me.  After reading that article, I walked in our kitchen and saw the fridge covered in kids' art work and thought: "I LIKE that clutter." (for once!). :)

I much prefer the look in some of the other minimalist, but in COLOR :) homes that others have posted links to.

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