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Can anyone tell me about the Creighton Model? - Page 2

post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sienamom View Post

I know this question was from two years ago, but I'm just seeing it now! Anyway, my hubby and I have been using the Creighton Method for two years now, but we began charting about six months before our wedding (we saved making love for marriage).

 

No, it's okay - the question was just asked last month.   Thanks for the information from all of you.  I took my introductory class last week.  It does seem very similar to Billings, but she said it's standardized (not sure exactly what that entails), and you can show your chart to your doctor to help with other  gyn health concerns.  I'm beginning to feel that have a teacher ensure that I am understanding it all correctly is really worth it. 

 

JMJ - I'm a little confused by what you're saying about the temping being more precise.  The way my teacher explained it, it is less precise.  Hmmm...  Looks like I'm still figuring it out. 

 

But, whatever. it seems like it will work best for me.  Thanks, all.

post #22 of 29
Quote:

JMJ - I'm a little confused by what you're saying about the temping being more precise.  The way my teacher explained it, it is less precise.  Hmmm...  Looks like I'm still figuring it out.



Your teacher is correct that CM is more precise than temperature to tell the fertile times.  However, it is even more precise to use a combination of temperature and CM.  CM alone is quite effective, though.  In certain circumstances (breastfeeding, menopause, etc), when there may be patches of mucus and then dry without ovulating, CM alone will not be able to tell you that you have ovulated until you actually have a period.  CM + temperature can tell you that you have ovulated within a few days.  For people who are very seriously avoiding pregnancy, knowing for sure that you did actually ovulate and that you are in post-ovulation fertility is very comforting.  For people who are seeking pregnancy and are having irregular cycles with mucus patches, it is helpful to know which mucus patch resulted in conception in order to have an accurate due date.  That said, with very precise Creighton charting, there is a lot you can know just from mucus, and with proper training in charting and interpreting, you could probably figure it out.

post #23 of 29

FYI- Right now the University of Utah is conducting an international study to assess the effectiveness of the Creighton Model. They are enrolling participants who are new or return-users of the Creighton Model until October 2011. Not only will you be learning about your own fertility, but you will also be contributing to important research that will help future users of Creighton Model.

 

Here is the link if you are interested: http://medicine.utah.edu/dfpm/Research/CEIBA/interested.htm

You can also find the study on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ceibastudy

post #24 of 29

Oh that sounds interesting! I even live in Utah! Sadly though, I plan on TTC in a few months. :-/

post #25 of 29

Spread the word to any friends who might be interested!

 

However, you might still qualify. To be join the study your intention must be to avoid for at least one month. After that, your intention can change. If you want more information feel free to contact us at ceibastudy@gmail.com. We would love to answer any questions. Thanks for taking a look!

post #26 of 29

Interesting information.  A research project is encouraging for new information as well.

 

 

post #27 of 29

We use the Creighton Method and LOVE it.  I tried Sympto-thermal back in college before we got married/were "intimate" and even then it wasn't working out.  5am soccer practice vs. late classes meant that I never got up at the same time, so my temps were all screwy!

Fast-forward about two years and a friend of mine introduced us to Creighton.  SSssssoooooo much better!  The reason a class is necessary is because it's "standardized."  That means that they back up their 99.9999999% success rate to users being super knowledgeable because they are guided by an instructor who can answer questions, thus pretty much eliminating user error/misinterpretation of instructions.  The class is not bad in my opinion time-wise.  It's on an individual couple basis and as you learn,  your meetings get spaced out until you only meet maybe once a year for a follow-up IF you need it (it's helpful after 9 months of not charting due to being pregnant!)  It's also helpful after birth in regard to breast-feeding (or not) and how to ensure that you won't get pregnant again right away (if your desire is to avoid pregnancy).

Long story short, I would totally go Creighton Method!  It involves checking cervical mucus before and after you pee (on a piece of toilet paper NOT via internal exam with finger!)  There are more types of mucus that you ever though possible, but the method breaks them down into fertile vs. non-fertile and once you learn the initial pieces, it's very easy!  This method is also awesome if you don't have the average person's sleep schedule or if your sleeping varies (from working some night shifts or something).  Sympto-thermal wouldn't work for those people, but Creighton Method counts your "end of day" as whenever you lay down to take the most hours of sleep for that 24 hour period.  (no pun intended)...... Hope that helps and HAPPY CHARTING!

 

 

 

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sienamom View Post

I know this question was from two years ago, but I'm just seeing it now! Anyway, my hubby and I have been using the Creighton Method for two years now, but we began charting about six months before our wedding (we saved making love for marriage).

 

We LOVE this method of charting and it helped us conceive our baby when we wanted to. As to why you can't find much information online to teach the method to yourself--this is to basically protect the effectiveness rate of NFP. When taught by an instructor, the effectiveness rate for NFP (and Creighton specifically) is something like 99.5%--it's an amazingly strong method for either preventing or achieving pregnancy. The founders of the method are passionate about ensuring that those who learn the method learn it correctly from an instructor--and learn it right, so that it can be that effective for you too.

 

By going to an instructor, we were able to ask questions while we were charting--and there were so many questions. But our instructor was so patient with us, looking at our chart and helping us determine what my patterns of irregular mucus meant, what we should do in times of stress (and possible "double peak" ovulation), and what to do once seminal fluid was introduced. I highly recommend that anyone who is interested in NFP find a certified instructor. It will ensure that you use the Creighton method correctly. I just moved to a new city and have found a few instructors through local Catholic churches who often have introductory classes on Creighton. 

 

It's totally worth the money, which is very little when compared to the ongoing costs of artificial hormonal contraception or barrier contraception. And, it's so healthy for your marriage. Thanks for letting me get on my soapbox. smile.gif  

I LOVE your "soapbox" I am a new Creighton Model Fertility Care Practitoner in California and you hit the nail on the head explaining the system as well as the value of the instructor. I initially learned the Sympto-thermal method which is great but I have fallen in love with the Creighton Model System.  If someone is debating the idea I strongly recommend checking it out. 

post #29 of 29

Me and my DH started out with the Billings method but found it difficult to learn. Part of this was certainly due to communication problems between myself and the instructor. After a few frustrating months, we switched to Creighton. The main difference was that Creighton method provided very clear, specific things to watch for with the CM, and a very specific way to check for CM. Billings requires the woman to interpret it based on general guidelines, and I found it was too difficult for the instructor (and me) to interpret my fertility, even after 3 months of charting. After switching to CrMS, I was immediately more confident with my charting.

 

The main drawback with CrMS versus Billings is how strict you need to be in the manner you take the CM observations. It does take some getting used to, to build the habit. I could see a woman preferring Billings if she was more comfortable using her own interpretations and observation method. But my confidence level in CrMS is way, way higher. We did have to pay again for the materials and go through the training again, but our CrMS instructor is fantastic, and got us through the material as quick as possible. Oh, also, I've been told that Billings has better smartphone aps than CrMS!

 

The main drawback with CrMS overall is the abstinence during fertile times eyesroll.gif Of course you can choose to use a barrier method, but there are strong cautions about higher pregnancy rates when using condoms (etc) instead of abstaining during fertile days. I personally haven't used condoms during my fertile days while charting, yet. But for the past few years my DH and I used condoms exclusively, without charting, and certainly during my fertile times, and we never had any issues.

 

Another thing to be aware of is that both Billings and CrMS come from a Christian background. If you're not Christian, you can certainly still learn the techniques for either method and use it for effective fertility planning. If you are, you may find the extra dimension of religion a welcome source of support as you learn the process with your partner.

 

That's my 2 cents wink1.gif End of the day, I've been charting CrMS for the last 2 cycles and I can see myself using it for years.

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