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Could people share their positive hospital birth stories. - Page 3

post #41 of 47

I'm a doula and have attended MANY wonderful hospital births - just plan carefully and get a doula...you'll be glad you did:)  Seriously, don't go in too early, don't agree to getting induced unless there is a genuine emergency happening, MOVE every 15 min. once you're in the room...even if they have you in bed - just keep moving from side to side.  ASK for a nurse who is supportive of natural birth...and is good at helping that to happen.  DON'T allow anyone in the room who is not supportive all the way.  Have a good birth plan...and hire a doula!!!  Take your red raspberry leaf tea and evening primrose oil...You'll do just fine!!!

post #42 of 47

I had a really positive hospital birth experience, but it was pretty intense, and as I run through the story, I'm conscious of how it could come across wrong.  You could use it to play Obstetrical Suckitude Bingo, only it didn't feel that way at the time, and it still doesn't feel that way to me now.

 

I had an emergency (but not crash) c-section, at the hospital the ambulance was willing to take me to, attended by a doctor who I had only met once before, and the senior OB resident.  Prior to surgery, my paramedics nearly had a fight with the admitting nurse (she didn't get their call, the nurse who did get the call had been clearing a room for me and hadn't passed on the message that NO, I was NOT going to triage).  They put me on the one bed in the four-bed L&D room with broken stirrups and a burnt out light, but they didn't want to move me (besides, the nurses were busy strapping on fetal heart rate monitors, contraction monitors, and running multiple IVs) so the doctors doing a very careful, very gentle, we know if we screw up you sue us type pelvic exam had to ask me to prop my hips up on an inverted bedpan, and then one of them had to stand on a stool behind the other, holding a flashlight.

 

This was at a world-class hospital, btw.  Stuff happens.

 

It was nearly midnight.  My husband didn't get there until twenty minutes after I did, approximately thirty seconds before the attending OB stomped in, grousing that if he was awake, someone should go wake the senior resident.  He said "we meet again."  I said "We've got to stop doing this."  He took a look around - at me, at my bloodstained bedroom slippers, at the gurney I was wheeled in on - and said "No kidding," in a tone of voice that suggested that he'd subbed in "kidding" for a much shorter and more obscene word, or possibly two of them.  Then he told me I should have a c-section, and that the OR would be clean and ready in 20 minutes.

 

Sometimes, in the darkest, awfullest moments of post-partum angst, I have wondered if maybe I should have argued for a delay.  I could have been on the strictest hospital bed rest ever.  They could keep me NPO and I could keep my feet up, they could run a foley catheter and bowel movements are overrated anyway, and we could just get the baby a few more days.  In the light of day, this is clearly crazy.  The attending OB told me that they couldn't keep me pregnant much longer, and said that if we waited for the next crisis, it could be too late.  We can help premature babies in the NICU.  We can't help them when they're bleeding to death in utero.  (For those of you filling in your cards at home, Dead Baby is the free space in the middle.)  Except that he was right.  He was not being alarmist.  I was at that hospital because we called an ambulance because when I stood up, the first gush of blood had hit the floor with an audible splash. 

 

Whenever possible, they asked me what I wanted, and then they did it, although there were genuinely very few choices available under the circumstances.  Topical anesthesia for the IV insertion?  Oxygen mask or tubes?  Is anyone coming to be with you?  What are their names?  We'll get them to you as fast as we can.   They brought my daughter to me, and they held her where I could see her and kiss her for as long as they could before they needed to take her away and give her lung surfactant.  They wheeled my gurney in to the NICU so I could see her again before they took me to the post-partum floor.

 

I honestly found the attending's crankiness reassuring.  It probably wouldn't work for everyone, but it was seriously a bad situation, if he could be cranky (about the sleeping senior resident), or fake cranky (about me bleeding all over his L&D unit for the second time in a month), rather than panicked, it was going to be okay.  I cope better when I can indulge in sarcasm, so it was nice of him to start it.

 

They acknowledged that the situation sucked.  There was no pretending it didn't suck.  No one attempted to cheer me up by saying that the only thing that mattered was the baby (I'd have found that pretty disturbing - a lot of that blood was mine, the baby was not the only person at risk).  They told me that they knew that this wasn't the birth I'd hoped for, but they would do everything they could to take care of us.

 

They did everything right, and we are all fine.  It's a scary story, but mostly I remember that I felt safe, and that they succeeded in what they told me they would do.

post #43 of 47

I had a positive experience. I was afraid my doctor wouldn't be on call so I was happy when my water broke in the middle of the night on Sunday. I figured I would probably give birth later that Monday and my doctor would be there. Nope, I got the hospital, they gave me an epidural, then the on-call doctor checked me for the first time about 2-3 hours after my water had broken and said I was ready to push. To my surprise I really didn't care who the nurse or doctor were anymore and I didn't care that I'd never met them. They were nice, answered my questions, let me know what was happening and I felt comfortable with them.

 

After I got the epidural I felt absolutely no pain, just a lot of excitement. My baby was born less than four hours after my water broke and they let me hold her immediately after she was born but then took her away to the NICU a few minutes later because she had fluid in her lungs and was turning blue-ish. They said that was not unusual for fast births. She was back with me in about 30 minutes and my husband was with her while she was taken to the NICU. I don't consider that a bad experience, I was just glad they were there to help her. When I was holding her right after she was born I wasn't even aware her color was unhealthy so it was good that the nurses were attentive.

 

No one pressured me to feed formula, everyone was very supportive and helped me learn to breastfeed. We stayed the full two days because insurance covered it and I was nervous about leaving since I was having some trouble with breastfeeding and I was worried my baby was going to scream inconsolably for colostrum that I wasn't producing enough of and I wouldn't know what to do. Those two days in the hospital with my husband and baby were the best two days of my life, and that is no exaggeration. It was very comfortable there, we got meals that I didn't have to cook, and we were able to just focus on learning how to take care of our newborn. We missed the baby care, childbirth classes and breastfeeding classes at the hospital because I was on bedrest during my pregnancy so having experts around me an extra day was really helpful.

post #44 of 47

I love this thread!  I recently decided to go with the hospital instead of home birth this time for insurance/financial reasons, and of course I keep encountering terrible hospital stories left and right, which is not helpful to me at this point.  So I love to read good stories.

 

I had my first baby in a hospital with midwives, and it was a good experience.  They ordered intermittent monitoring for me and no one ever tried to keep me in or even near the bed after I did an initial 20 minutes on the monitor.  I had a great nurse who enjoyed working with the midwives and loved to see natural childbirth, which was nice.  After the baby was born and they were getting ready to move me to a postpartum room, I realized how loud I had been during pushing and expressed my embarrassment at disturbing everyone.  She was like, "oh, please, I've had moms with epidurals be much louder."  :)

 

The postpartum stay left a lot to be desired, I will say.  Our first postpartum nurse was great, but the others were pretty callous and totally phoning it in.  The hospital didn't have an LC on staff because "the nurses are trained in breastfeeding support" but in truth they were pretty useless.  I don't think any of this stuff would bother me much the third time around, but for a very emotional first-time mom whose baby was crying a lot, I could have used a bit more compassion and help.  However, I was grateful that I didn't have any trouble declining stuff we didn't want, such as the Hep B vaccination and the bath, and that the on-staff pediatrician was great.  He was of Indian heritage and so was very supportive of not circing, and also didn't suggest supplementation even though DS1 had lost 10% of his birth weight by the time we left the hospital. 

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by macy View Post

I had a positive experience. I was afraid my doctor wouldn't be on call so I was happy when my water broke in the middle of the night on Sunday. I figured I would probably give birth later that Monday and my doctor would be there. Nope, I got the hospital, they gave me an epidural, then the on-call doctor checked me for the first time about 2-3 hours after my water had broken and said I was ready to push. To my surprise I really didn't care who the nurse or doctor were anymore and I didn't care that I'd never met them. They were nice, answered my questions, let me know what was happening and I felt comfortable with them.

 

After I got the epidural I felt absolutely no pain, just a lot of excitement. My baby was born less than four hours after my water broke and they let me hold her immediately after she was born but then took her away to the NICU a few minutes later because she had fluid in her lungs and was turning blue-ish. They said that was not unusual for fast births. She was back with me in about 30 minutes and my husband was with her while she was taken to the NICU. I don't consider that a bad experience, I was just glad they were there to help her. When I was holding her right after she was born I wasn't even aware her color was unhealthy so it was good that the nurses were attentive.

 

No one pressured me to feed formula, everyone was very supportive and helped me learn to breastfeed. We stayed the full two days because insurance covered it and I was nervous about leaving since I was having some trouble with breastfeeding and I was worried my baby was going to scream inconsolably for colostrum that I wasn't producing enough of and I wouldn't know what to do. Those two days in the hospital with my husband and baby were the best two days of my life, and that is no exaggeration. It was very comfortable there, we got meals that I didn't have to cook, and we were able to just focus on learning how to take care of our newborn. We missed the baby care, childbirth classes and breastfeeding classes at the hospital because I was on bedrest during my pregnancy so having experts around me an extra day was really helpful.



most of this last paragraph is completely my experience with my last birth

I even had a nurse bring us in pastry from my favorite bakery! And the hospitals here tend to have celebratory meals after baby's birth thats totally different from the normal hospital menu (think lobster, steak and vegetarian lasagna).

post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGVaughn View Post


most of this last paragraph is completely my experience with my last birth

I even had a nurse bring us in pastry from my favorite bakery! And the hospitals here tend to have celebratory meals after baby's birth thats totally different from the normal hospital menu (think lobster, steak and vegetarian lasagna).



My hospital was the same way.  They had steak and the food came on a tray with flowers and sparkling cider in champagne glasses. :)

 

Another treat was the chimes they played as we were moved from L&D to post-partum.  It was an announcement to the hospital that a baby had been born.  Just thinking about how wonderful that sounded makes me emotional/teary.  We got to hear them from time to time when we went to the hospital for our natural birth classes, so it was exciting and an accomplishment when it was our turn!

post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by tea_time View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by SGVaughn View Post


most of this last paragraph is completely my experience with my last birth

I even had a nurse bring us in pastry from my favorite bakery! And the hospitals here tend to have celebratory meals after baby's birth thats totally different from the normal hospital menu (think lobster, steak and vegetarian lasagna).



My hospital was the same way.  They had steak and the food came on a tray with flowers and sparkling cider in champagne glasses. :)

 

Another treat was the chimes they played as we were moved from L&D to post-partum.  It was an announcement to the hospital that a baby had been born.  Just thinking about how wonderful that sounded makes me emotional/teary.  We got to hear them from time to time when we went to the hospital for our natural birth classes, so it was exciting and an accomplishment when it was our turn!



 I forgot all about the chimes!! One more thing to look forward to :)

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