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Homemade Raw Goat Milk Yogurt

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I made some yogurt last night using pastuerized whole milk yogurt as the starter. It came out as runny as the milk that I poured in 6 hours earlier. Did I do anything wrong or does it take several batches for it to become thicker?

 

I will say for clarity and to save time: I know this is not going to be as thick as store-bought yogurt. However, I don't believe it should be as watery as milk. I expected a consistency more like that of homemade kefir.

 

Here's the recipe I followed: http://hubpages.com/hub/How-to-Make-Goats-Milk-Yogurt-An-Illustrated-Guide-to-a-Simple-Method

post #2 of 14

Been a while since I made yogurt with animal milk (dd is very intolerant) but I always cultured mine for longer than that - at least 12 hours -  so that could be part of it. And my raw milk yogurt was never thick - it was only thick if I scalded it (heated to 185) and then cooled to 110-115 before adding starter.

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tip. I'll try that. The recipe said 6 hours, but I thought that seemed a little short.

post #4 of 14

What method did you use to maintain your temperature?  If the proper temperature is not maintained, you will not get yogurt.  This can be tricky for some people to figure out, since everyone's environment is different. 

 

And I agree that longer is better - I always do 24 hours on my yogurt. 

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

What method did you use to maintain your temperature?  If the proper temperature is not maintained, you will not get yogurt.  This can be tricky for some people to figure out, since everyone's environment is different. 

 

And I agree that longer is better - I always do 24 hours on my yogurt. 


What she said!

 

When I have made goat yogurt in the past it is runnier than cows and you have to transfer it to the fridge for several more hours to firm it up more.

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

What method did you use to maintain your temperature?  If the proper temperature is not maintained, you will not get yogurt.  This can be tricky for some people to figure out, since everyone's environment is different. 

 

And I agree that longer is better - I always do 24 hours on my yogurt. 


 

A thermometer

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by NettleTea View Post




 

A thermometer



 



??

Thats not what I meant... The thermometer is only reading the temperature. The milk has to be kept warm, around 100F, but not exceeding 110F for the entire length of fermentation. Unless you keep your thermostat really high, just sitting on the counter isnt going to accomplish that.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post





 

??Thats not what I meant... The thermometer is only reading the temperature. The milk has to be kept warm, around 100F, but not exceeding 110F for the entire length of fermentation. Unless you keep your thermostat really high, just sitting on the counter isnt going to accomplish that.


I misread your question bag.gif

 

I used the oven, set on a very low temp.

post #9 of 14

Goat yogurt won't be as thick as homemade cow yogurt.  Some people add powdered goat milk to make it thicker and creamier, or they add tapioca starch.  I don't do grains so I haven't tried that but most store-bought goat yogurt has tapioca in it as a thickening agent.  I have a batch of goat yogurt going now that I added a little gelatin to, which sounds weird but it worked so well with my coconut yogurt I thought I'd give it a try.  It does not come out like jell-o at all, just like regular creamy yogurt.  I haven't done it with goat before but I'll let you know what happens.  I also ferment for 24 hours to make it thicker and more tart, with more beneficial bacteria.  After 24 hours most of the lactose should be gone as well.

 

I always used to use an insulated cooler to make yogurt but I finally bought a yogurt maker that holds 3 quart-sized mason jars.  It has saved me a lot of hassle, because if you do 24-hour ferments it is difficult to maintain the proper temperature without baby-sitting the yogurt all day, and you can still use your oven.  It seems to keep the milk at a steady 100-102 degrees the whole time.  It was not very expensive either.

 

One more thing, if you're using store-bought yogurt as a starter it could take longer to ferment than if you're using an actual starter or real home-made yogurt, since it doesn't contain as many bacteria to start with.

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joybird View Post

One more thing, if you're using store-bought yogurt as a starter it could take longer to ferment than if you're using an actual starter or real home-made yogurt, since it doesn't contain as many bacteria to start with.



That is good to know. I was thinking of just foregoing the store bought yogurt and buying some starter from Cultures for Health.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by NettleTea View Post


 


I misread your question " rel="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/bag.gif">bag.gif

 

" rel="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/bag.gif">I used the oven, set on a very low temp.



 



Whats the temp setting? My oven's lowest setting is 170, which is far too hot for yogurt. Do you have an oven thermometer? Id suggest monitoring the temp, i suspect that is the problem.

And ive never had a problem using storebought yogurt as starter.
post #12 of 14

Can I ask one related question about goat milk yogurt? What does it taste like? I'm afraid the fermentation will bring out the "goaty" flavor (like store-bought goat milk, or goat bucks in rut. puke.gif). We're beginning a raw goat milk share next month, and this is the only thing that has me apprehensive. I'd read that getting it cooled quickly after milking is what makes it taste good and not goaty, so I'm afraid leaving it to ferment will do the opposite...

post #13 of 14

I have never noticed my goat milk yogurt tasting any more goaty than the milk.  I would say less goaty, but more tart... you can always add a sweetener if you don't like the taste, and fresh fruit.

post #14 of 14
I second that it sounds like you might have used too much heat. If the yogurt gets over 110 it kills the cultures, and you just have milk.

What I have found works well for me is to put the oven on its lowest setting for about five minutes and then turn it off, turn on the oven light, and put in towel-wrapped mason jars for at least 12 hours.

Using the right storebought yogurt as a starter is key too. I have not had luck with stoneyfield farms for example but Clover (a local brand) works amazingly well.
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