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Would you let your boy wear pink out in public? - Page 4

post #61 of 83

I have the reverse problem. DD is 9 months old and the only snowsuits that I can find as a PP said, are in pepto bismol-watered-down-with-white pink. Grrrr. Why does she have to be restricted to only pink. I found it so stupid when I called stores to ask them if they have snowsuits for 9-12 months and they asked me, "Boy or Girl?" It's a snow suit for crying out loud. Not a frock. The thing that looks like big overalls? If it is cold enough to put one on, most of her face is probably not even visible because of the hat and scarf?

post #62 of 83

THIS is my son...the one in the pink with the blond curls. He looks like this because it's his own choice. I have a great big soap box that I can stand on about allowing children the freedom to express themselves no matter how comfortable you are with the idea but my pink loving little boy is hungry for dinner. :)

post #63 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasya View Post

I have the reverse problem. DD is 9 months old and the only snowsuits that I can find as a PP said, are in pepto bismol-watered-down-with-white pink. Grrrr. Why does she have to be restricted to only pink. I found it so stupid when I called stores to ask them if they have snowsuits for 9-12 months and they asked me, "Boy or Girl?" It's a snow suit for crying out loud. Not a frock. The thing that looks like big overalls? If it is cold enough to put one on, most of her face is probably not even visible because of the hat and scarf?


Haha!  I used this to my advantage with my ds.  When he was 4, we went to buy a new winter coat.  I was in the boy's section, so all the coats were navy, grey or brown.  I asked my ds which one he liked.  He kinda shrugged and

said he guessed the blue one.  My lightbulb went on and I went where I knew he could get what he wanted.  The girl's section.  When he saw the pink coats, his face lit up and he said, "That one, Momma!"  He still wears that coat at 9 even though it is too small.

post #64 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourney View Post

THIS is my son...the one in the pink with the blond curls. He looks like this because it's his own choice. I have a great big soap box that I can stand on about allowing children the freedom to express themselves no matter how comfortable you are with the idea but my pink loving little boy is hungry for dinner. :)



You and I must shop at the same store then. I love the picture.

 

DS removes anything that isn't pink or purple as soon as you get it on him... Unless it has a skirt, sparkles or flowers.

post #65 of 83

MusicianDad: Pink has been DS's favorite color since he was two. His bedroom is bubblegum pink, along with pretty much everything in it. The irony in this is that I was a total "dude" chick pre-child (raced mountain bikes and adventure races, avid backpacker, blahblah) and I was SO relieved to have a son so that people wouldn't inundate us with pink! Now it's all I *EVER* see...and I wouldn't want it any other way.

post #66 of 83

It was about ten months ago or so when DS started asking for a dress like his sister, DH and I were planning on picking one up when we went shopping for new clothes but DD had some extra fabric laying around so she made him a purple one. As soon as she showed it to him he shrieked with joy and started stripping yelling "Put it on!" It was way too cute so now he has a few dresses he wears. And to be honest it's much easier to change diapers. We sometimes get comments or funny looks, but the kid is way to happy for us to let that put a stop to it.

post #67 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourney View Post

THIS is my son...the one in the pink with the blond curls. He looks like this because it's his own choice. I have a great big soap box that I can stand on about allowing children the freedom to express themselves no matter how comfortable you are with the idea but my pink loving little boy is hungry for dinner. :)



How cute!!!  He looks so happy!

 

PS- good to see a boy with blond curls as my 19 month old ds is getting them and they are thin still, but I want to let them grow out.  Love it!

post #68 of 83

From a practical standpoint, as another person said, I think it makes more sense to just use what you have rather than going out and buying something new that will only be used for a short time.  

 

I do try to avoid deliberately sending the wrong message about my children's biological sex, especially before they're old enough to make those decisions for themselves. I mean, I'm not going to dress my baby in a pink dress and hairbow, then say "Actually, he's a boy!" indignantly when someone comments on the cute girl just for giggles or to make a point. On the other hand, I didn't give DS a buzz cut or dress him in football print or a suit and tie in order to avoid confusion, and my favorite outfit for DD2 has brown stripes and a puppy and I'm sure was intended for a boy (as were a lot of her hand-me-downs). And I have a "Future football star" onesie that I plan on pairing with something pink at some point, so perhaps I'm calling the kettle black a little :)

 

Once they get old enough to have clothing preferences, I'm happy to let them wear what they want, but I'll discuss with them ahead of time how others might perceive it so that they have the information they need to make an educated decision. In my experience with DS, most of the time he'll choose to wear it anyways.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebirdmama1 View Post

So here are some pics:

 

Here is 3 yr dd this past summer with a shirt that everyone said she looked like a boy with.  What do you think?  I am considering getting rid of it.  (Oh and please excuse the wild hair as I have no idea how to tame it somehow.  My ds is getting hair like that too and I have no curly hair anywhere in the family!)

 

Here is the coat that I am asking about but it is just the fleece layer in the pic and there is a winter cover basically the same color that goes over it.  This is 2 yr old dd.  Do you think this is too girly?

 

 

I'd consider the fleece jacket to be relatively neutral, and would probably assume boy if they were wearing neutral or boyish pants and shoes.

For the three year old... look for the book Curly Girl by Lorraine Massey (or just google - I think most of the most relevant info can be found online). It's all about getting curly hair to look good :)

 

(sorry for the font change. Copying and pasting does that to me, and it drives me insane.)

post #69 of 83
Thread Starter 

Thanks fo rthe book rec!


 

 

post #70 of 83

Oceletmom, I have friend who told me that her sister had very curly and unmanageable hair and her mother repeatedly shaved off her sister's hair until it grew out straight. Her sister is now about 20 years old or so, and has very long thick straight hair. I don't know if that is an option for you.

post #71 of 83
Pink is my son's favorite color and he says "Pink is the new black".
Andrew in pink, he has several pink shirts.

I see nothing wrong with a boy wearing pink if he wants to. Should girls not wear blue?
post #72 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasya View Post

Oceletmom, I have friend who told me that her sister had very curly and unmanageable hair and her mother repeatedly shaved off her sister's hair until it grew out straight. Her sister is now about 20 years old or so, and has very long thick straight hair. I don't know if that is an option for you.



Is this a way of telling a momma that her child's curly hair is not absolutely adorable? That straight hair is somehow more to be desired than curly? I have one curly girl and I can't imagine thinking of trying to turn it straight.

post #73 of 83

I don't have boys, just girls, but I don't know why they wouldn't wear pink outside the home! Men look great in pink, especially those with darker features.

 

Anyway, I too have the opposite problem. Especially when my ODD was a baby/young toddler, I had difficulty finding things that weren't pink and/or really girly. I tried to be very neutral in their younger years and I actually often ended up buying ODD a lot of basic boys' clothes that could pass as neutral, because I had a hard time finding things for her that didn't have a Disney Princess on them, or ruffles or lace, or bratty sayings like, "what daddy won't buy me, grandma will!", or "Everyone Screams for My Ice Cream" with two cones with cherries in a suggestive place. No kidding, I actually saw it, and it was 4T. Where's the barfy smiley for that? puke.gif Though it does seem to have gotten better and I'm happy I've been seeing more colours and less of them with graphics/logos/sayings, and more of them just nicely cut but not terribly frilly, but it was inescapable a few years ago.

 

Anyway, didn't affect my daughters to wear boyish stuff. My ODD isn't especially girly but she's not really a tomboy either. I think she owns one dress, she's a jeans-and-t-shirt kinda gal. My YDD wears pants when she's horseback riding, or shorts in the summer once in a while, but otherwise doesn't really wear pants. I'm cool with it either way. If she wanted to dress like a boy, she could dress like a boy.

 

If it's not a moral choice (like pleather booty shorts for preschoolers, needing that barfy smilie again) and they're not pushing to wear jeans and a tunic to a wedding or something, I personally thing all clothing decisions should be up to the kid once they can voice an opinion on it.

post #74 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasya View Post

Oceletmom, I have friend who told me that her sister had very curly and unmanageable hair and her mother repeatedly shaved off her sister's hair until it grew out straight. Her sister is now about 20 years old or so, and has very long thick straight hair. I don't know if that is an option for you.



That's ridiculous. Hair doesn't "learn" to be straight. Straight versus curly versus wavy is a gene. Some children will have curly hair and it'll naturally straighten out, but cutting it off or shaving it doesn't do that any more than cutting or shaving it off makes black hair grow back in as blonde.

post #75 of 83

Wow, I got so sidetracked by what seemed to be an anti-curl comment that I forgot to comment on the actual thread topic. I have no problem with boys in pink. I don't think there's such a thing as girl colors or boy colors.

post #76 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasya View Post

Oceletmom, I have friend who told me that her sister had very curly and unmanageable hair and her mother repeatedly shaved off her sister's hair until it grew out straight. Her sister is now about 20 years old or so, and has very long thick straight hair. I don't know if that is an option for you.


Yeah not a nice idea. That would especially destroy a childs self esteem.
post #77 of 83

Just to be clear, since my name is being pasted around right and left... the book I mentioned is focused on bringing out curls, caring for them properly, and making them look good, not eliminating them :) Personally, I'm actually looking to make my DD's hair *more* curly - she has straightish hair on top which tends to look shaggy, with loose curls underneath and in the back. Making it be straight would probably actually be easier (with brushing, not shaving!), but I think the curls are adorable and would like to go that direction if possible (and that's what DD wants, too).

post #78 of 83


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourney View Post

THIS is my son...the one in the pink with the blond curls. He looks like this because it's his own choice. I have a great big soap box that I can stand on about allowing children the freedom to express themselves no matter how comfortable you are with the idea but my pink loving little boy is hungry for dinner. :)



Oh my gosh, your son is adorable! And I think it's great that you are helping have a strong foundation in his own self-esteem by letting him freely express himself :)

post #79 of 83

yes.

I personally am not fond of the color pink, but if DD or a future DS wants to, I have no problem with it.

Also if it was a hand me down or given to us adn we needed it, pink it is!

post #80 of 83

Oh goodness, I seem to have set off a cascade of protests. I personally wouldn't even want to shave my kid's hair ever. I only said this if she's finding it unmanageable. And passed on something from someone if that seems like something someone else wants as an option.

 

That said, culturally, (read, MIL...), I HAVE to get DD's head shaved when she's about a year old. My dad didn't believe in that. So, we lucked out. None of us had to endure that. I am still hoping to swing it so that my girl's hair will be left alone until she's old enough to have her say. At which point, she'll protest, loud and clear, I am sure.

 

I asked in a different forum if anyone's noticed any changes in hair appearance/texture after shaving. MANY did. So, it isn't a myth.

 

This whole thing is like forced circumcision. Not really because hair is hair, it'll grow back, but forced removal of any part of a body for cultural reasons...

 

Oceletmom, ok! :-).

 

My own hair is a funny mix of straight and curly, and I've tried working it into a curlier or straighter style. One looked messy. The other looked, well, pasty. :-(. I just let mine air dry and do it's own  thing. So, I am not advocating for one or the other. I misunderstood your post. Sorry, Oceletmom!

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