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All the cupcakes and junk food - Page 2

post #21 of 30

St Paul Public Schools has a 'Healthy Celebrations' policy, dicouraging cupcakes and such.

http://ns.spps.org/sites/3045cf14-0431-4dc4-af6f-c79a83745084/uploads/Healthy_CelebrationsBW.pdf

Do a little research and bring it up with the PTA, principal, school district meeting, etc. See what you can get started!

post #22 of 30

link didn't work. would like to read it if there is another link!

post #23 of 30

DD1's school sent home a newsletter saying that no birthday treats were allowed (above kindergarden) but that same newsletter contained notices about two "very important" fundraisers involving McDonalds and cookie dough sales.  uhoh3.gif

post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masel View Post

DD1's school sent home a newsletter saying that no birthday treats were allowed (above kindergarden) but that same newsletter contained notices about two "very important" fundraisers involving McDonalds and cookie dough sales.  uhoh3.gif



biglaugh.gifThat totally cracked me up! 

post #25 of 30
Quote:

 

Schools have to choose between "only prepared foods from stores" and allowing parents to make things. We've done it both ways, and at our small private school, food from home works. But I don't see ANY public schools going that way. So I don't think that what you are asking for isn't going to happen.

 

 

I think it's very regional and probably has a lot to do with insurance and liability laws. At our small, midwestern, local public school we bring home made treats. I'll also agree that banning everything on the top allergen risk will have little support and little success. For MOST people, it does eliminate all kinds of baked goods. YES - they could potentially figure out how to bake gluten-free but I can't see that happening for MOST people.

 

and for the record - my kid will be brininging cupcakes out of box and pre-made pink dyed icing for her b-day next week -  thumb.gif

post #26 of 30

If you don't want your child to have a cupcake every so often at school you should either give them an alternative snack or bring an alternative snack for him to share if it is a class party. I agree there needs to be a balance of healthy snacks and sweets at school parties but I don't think one parent who doesn't let their child have sweets gets to tell everyone else that they can't bring them in either. Everyone has the right to make their own decisions about food for their family and I respect that. However, the respect goes both ways. Just because a parent brings in cupcakes with blue icing for a birthday snack does not make them bad parents or mean they don't care about their child. Sometimes I think the posts on this topic come across that way, with a lot of judgment. We have enough restrictions and regulations about food at school parties already, I don't think we need to add more.

post #27 of 30

Next year DD will be going to a public school district one over from Ellien's and only store bought food is allowed. This frustrates me since DD has allergies and I can do a better job of making sure this one snack is okay for her. I'll probably end up sending the small packages of Oreos or Teddy Grahams since I don't trust store bake goods. I've considered buying some pasteboard boxes and doing up my own labels but I should probably set a better example for my kids. 

post #28 of 30

We have these restrictions because an obesity epedemic, children with allergies, and other issues that may dictate certain diets.  I am so glad DDs school will not let snacks for Bday parties.  Instead they are asked to donate a book to the class library and they all read it and sing happy birthday. 

 

 

For class parties everything is planned ahead of time and surrounds the unit theme.  Also a few parents whose kids have wheat / gluten / and lactose intoleranvces get together and make alternatives for them.  

 

For example they had an Alice tea party on Friday and the food were scones, herbal tea, fruit, and cheese sandwiches. 

post #29 of 30

I back the others who've suggested PTO involvement.  But you mentioned something else that's not being addressed--the cafeteria menu.  Unlike birthdays, that's something that children deal with every single day.  Don't get me wrong, still address the parties and cupcakes.  But work on the school lunches while you're at it because it's a more frequent concern and something you may have a stronger say in.

 

ETA: I was talking with my friend the other day about the ridiculousness of school sweets.  From October through April, there's always some holiday that justifies massive candy consumption.  eyesroll.gif   If kids aren't receiving the candy, there eating all of the leftover stash.  Birthdays only compound the problem, so I definitely know how you feel.

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masel View Post

DD1's school sent home a newsletter saying that no birthday treats were allowed (above kindergarden) but that same newsletter contained notices about two "very important" fundraisers involving McDonalds and cookie dough sales.  uhoh3.gif



At first glance that sounded really strange that treats were banned while fast food and icky processed cookie dough were ok but the more I think about it the more I think that's ok. Parents have little control over what their kids are consuming in the classroom when other kids are bringing in treats plus there are allergy issues. Parents are ones who decide to take their kids to mcdonalds or feed them cookies outside of school. It could also be that treats in the classroom are disruptive and get the kids riled up over the anticipation of the sugar and the sugar high after. 

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