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Should we get food stamps? - Page 6

post #101 of 181

ETA: this is not on the original topic, but it sort of seems like the original topic was gone long ago :)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post

 

As a cashier, I have sold fresh lobster to somebody who paid with food stamps. I'm still irritated about it 15 years later. But when it comes right down to it, the income limits for FS are so low that I think anybody who qualifies should take them. I also think there should be a limited selection of staple items that FS will cover, but that's a whole 'nother thread.

 

OP, you obviously need to adjust things in your household until income exceeds expenses. You already know this. If food stamps tide you over during that process, then I'm calling that a good use of my tax dollars.

 

I have to say I somewhat agree with the highlighted statement also...

 

When my BIL got out of jail he had nothing, no job, not a place to live (he stayed with us briefly) and no money for food.  He applied for and received food stamps.  In his situation he needed them until he could find work and be able to support himself.  It bothers me that he could have avoided the situation by not getting into trouble and going to jail in the first place, but if he's expected to become a productive member of society then the assistance was needed and I don't mind our tax dollars going towards helping him out.  Here's why I agree with the above statement.  Instead of going out and buying nutritious foods for himself, he was going to the corner store and buying Gatorade (not for the electrolytes but because he doesn't like to drink water), ice cream, ring dings and chips, they weren't healthy and they were way over priced because he was buying them at a convenience store.  The amount that was given to him for the month was completely wasted on junk food (we were paying for and cooking his actual meals here at our house).  I feel he should not have been allowed to do that.  Even though once the money is on his EBT card it's technically his to spend on whatever food he chooses.  I just don't feel like that is what the system was set up for, and that's why there should be some sort of restrictions.

 

It would probably bother me too if I saw someone buying lobster with their ebt card.. because eating lobster is usually thought of being a luxury item.. But I'd rather see someone buying lobster than seeing a cart full of chips, soda, cookies, and snack foods.

 

When I was a kid my mom got assistance, because she's on disability.. I don't think we ever got food stamps per say, but we were given coupons to get free food from the farmers market in the summer, because of that I remember actually eating fruits and vegetables that I would not have gotten if my mom was given an EBT card and was left to make her own choices.  To this day she only eats packaged/already prepared foods.  We did also get meals at Thanksgiving which included a turkey and fixin's, and a couple times a year we went to the place that they would give out government cheese, peanut butter, and things like that.  I think things like that are a better use of the funds we are giving to people.


 

post #102 of 181
As someone who works in a grocery store I don't pass judgement on what someone with ebt buys . it is frustrating when people think its a store that chooses what isd covered by ebt and get extremely upset, when their card won't work to cover those items...

I Wouldn't qualify for food stamps because I make 3000 too much. even Though my debt reduces my salary by a significant amount .I Cut everything I can to make ends meet and I would love to have that cushion. But like I said earlier I and my family aren't starving. I Can buy food albeit not the exact food I would like but enough.

I would take food stamps if I had exhausted all avenues and meal planning/budgeting such as angel ministries, couponc, less meat etc.....but again to each their own. I suppose that every one has a different comfort level of how far they would take themselves and their family.
post #103 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by JesKace View Post

ETA: this is not on the original topic, but it sort of seems like the original topic was gone long ago :)


 

 But I'd rather see someone buying lobster than seeing a cart full of chips, soda, cookies, and snack foods.


 


 

Me too! I started receiving food stamps last month and I was shocked that you could buy sugary foods and drinks with a food stamp card. What the heck is that about? It's supposed to be assistance to provide food. Not ding dongs and crap like that. I *really* wish there were prepared snacks limitations.

 

I am not taking WIC because I find their limits *too* limiting. We do not drink milk, I will not eat tuna while pregnant, we do not eat cereal ever and we do not buy fruit juice so we really can use WIC for very little, but if we could have access to fresh fruits and veggies, and meats that would be awesome. So, I think WIC is too limiting and food stamps are not limiting enough.

post #104 of 181



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by geekgolightly View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by JesKace View Post

ETA: this is not on the original topic, but it sort of seems like the original topic was gone long ago :)


 

 But I'd rather see someone buying lobster than seeing a cart full of chips, soda, cookies, and snack foods.


 


 

Me too! I started receiving food stamps last month and I was shocked that you could buy sugary foods and drinks with a food stamp card. What the heck is that about? It's supposed to be assistance to provide food. Not ding dongs and crap like that. I *really* wish there were prepared snacks limitations.

 

I am not taking WIC because I find their limits *too* limiting. We do not drink milk, I will not eat tuna while pregnant, we do not eat cereal ever and we do not buy fruit juice so we really can use WIC for very little, but if we could have access to fresh fruits and veggies, and meats that would be awesome. So, I think WIC is too limiting and food stamps are not limiting enough.


So, there should be limits on what can be bought with food stamps - and who do you think should get to define those limits? The users of MDC? I'd love to see them fight it out - the vegans, the vegetarians, the TF eaters, the people whose kids have allergies and believe that therefor nobody else should be allowed to eat what their kid is allergic to - everyone who knows it all about nutrition but does not agree with each other. All fighting about what is a "staple",  what is "healthy", what other peoples should be "allowed" to buy with their food stamps..
 

post #105 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post



 


So, there should be limits on what can be bought with food stamps - and who do you think should get to define those limits? The users of MDC? I'd love to see them fight it out - the vegans, the vegetarians, the TF eaters, the people whose kids have allergies and believe that therefor nobody else should be allowed to eat what their kid is allergic to - everyone who knows it all about nutrition but does not agree with each other. All fighting about what is a "staple",  what is "healthy", what other peoples should be "allowed" to buy with their food stamps..
 



 



The government has the food pyramid and recommendations so I would guess that they would use that to determine what is acceptable. And maybe as a compromise, the fs could have a percentage that could be used on discretionary purchases.

I must admit it does make my blood boil to think of people abusing the system. I saw a lot of abuse after a certain hurricane.

I guess it comes down to - some people see things and attribute good motives and others see the same thing and attribute bad (re: the lobster - saving up for special treat vs. wasteful use of fs). Depending on your experience, upbringing, personality, etc you (general you) have a worldview.
post #106 of 181

The US govt subsidizes the production of those sugary drinks and junk food.  Millions of dollars go to subsidize the farmers that grow the corn and wheat ingredients.  More is spent on creating markets for these products.  More is spent on buying surplus for the school lunch program.  Millions are spent on subsidizing health care related to the consumption of white flour and sweet drinks (high fructose corn syrup) such as diabetes and heart disease.   I don't find it shocking that such things are allowed to be purchased with food stamps.  Food stamps and farm subsidies are part of the same giant law called the farm bill.  The whole thing is deeply influenced by agribusiness giants who like to wrap the story of the embattled American farmer around the law.  The controlling interests of United States (corporations) want everyone's money spent on sugary drinks and junk food.  Our GDP depends on it.  Until the entire systemic problem is solved, there is no solution to either hunger or obesity: they are two sides of the same coin. 

post #107 of 181

Yes, exactly! This is the exact reason that SOY is in everything. Ugh, it's horrible!

 

 

"Like most processed foods, the Twinkie is basically a clever arrangement of carbohydrates and fats teased out of corn, soybeans and wheat–three of the five commodity crops that the farm bill supports, to the tune of some $25 billion a year. (Rice and cotton are the others.) For the last several decades–indeed, for about as long as the American waistline has been ballooning–U.S. agricultural policy has been designed in such a way as to promote the overproduction of these five commodities, especially corn and soy." Michael Pollan

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmsMom View Post

The US govt subsidizes the production of those sugary drinks and junk food.  Millions of dollars go to subsidize the farmers that grow the corn and wheat ingredients.  More is spent on creating markets for these products.  More is spent on buying surplus for the school lunch program.  Millions are spent on subsidizing health care related to the consumption of white flour and sweet drinks (high fructose corn syrup) such as diabetes and heart disease.   I don't find it shocking that such things are allowed to be purchased with food stamps.  Food stamps and farm subsidies are part of the same giant law called the farm bill.  The whole thing is deeply influenced by agribusiness giants who like to wrap the story of the embattled American farmer around the law.  The controlling interests of United States (corporations) want everyone's money spent on sugary drinks and junk food.  Our GDP depends on it.  Until the entire systemic problem is solved, there is no solution to either hunger or obesity: they are two sides of the same coin. 

post #108 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post


So, there should be limits on what can be bought with food stamps - and who do you think should get to define those limits? The users of MDC? I'd love to see them fight it out - the vegans, the vegetarians, the TF eaters, the people whose kids have allergies and believe that therefor nobody else should be allowed to eat what their kid is allergic to - everyone who knows it all about nutrition but does not agree with each other. All fighting about what is a "staple",  what is "healthy", what other peoples should be "allowed" to buy with their food stamps..
 



Hahahhahaaa....yeah, truly! The powers that be would define those limits according to the current food pyramid and the subsidized crop du jour. And I don't imagine that'd go over real well with most mdc users who found themselves in the unfortunate financial position of needing foodstamps.

post #109 of 181

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmsMom View Post

The US govt subsidizes the production of those sugary drinks and junk food.  Millions of dollars go to subsidize the farmers that grow the corn and wheat ingredients.  More is spent on creating markets for these products.  More is spent on buying surplus for the school lunch program.  Millions are spent on subsidizing health care related to the consumption of white flour and sweet drinks (high fructose corn syrup) such as diabetes and heart disease.   I don't find it shocking that such things are allowed to be purchased with food stamps.  Food stamps and farm subsidies are part of the same giant law called the farm bill.  The whole thing is deeply influenced by agribusiness giants who like to wrap the story of the embattled American farmer around the law.  The controlling interests of United States (corporations) want everyone's money spent on sugary drinks and junk food.  Our GDP depends on it.  Until the entire systemic problem is solved, there is no solution to either hunger or obesity: they are two sides of the same coin. 

 

This is so sad isn't it!  No wonder why our society is blowing up like balloons.  Myself included, and it's so hard to change a lifetime of bad eating habits once you've been brought up this way.
 

Quote:


So, there should be limits on what can be bought with food stamps - and who do you think should get to define those limits? The users of MDC? I'd love to see them fight it out - the vegans, the vegetarians, the TF eaters, the people whose kids have allergies and believe that therefor nobody else should be allowed to eat what their kid is allergic to - everyone who knows it all about nutrition but does not agree with each other. All fighting about what is a "staple",  what is "healthy", what other peoples should be "allowed" to buy with their food stamps..
 

 

I know, that's the problem with the system, it's run by the government who isn't looking out for the best interest of the people that are in need of the system.  If it were about really helping people get nutritious healthy foods the guidelines would be set by a large group of nutritionists who can take into account different lifestyles vege, vegan, TF, allergies.... and so on, and be able to cater the items to particular families.  But that would require too much work from the goverment, it's easier just to hand out an EBT card and not actually help out the families that really need it.

 

My mother told me she plans on applying for food stamps because her income is too low (I don't agree, because she lives with her partner who makes a decent income as a full time teacher, but because they aren't married her partner's income doesn't need to be claimed on the application...which I feel is abuse, different topic) Anyways, she plans on getting FS to supplement their income.  She's morbidly obese, had gastric bypass surgery about 8 years ago, lost about 90 lbs and has put it back on over the past 6 or so years... The surgery was paid for by the state (medicare? she's in VA) because she's on disability and on state health insurance. She has diabetes, high blood pressure, all sorts of stomach complications (I think she's gluten intolerant, but won't try to modify her diet to see if it would help) and other health problems such as arthritis from being overweight for such a long time.  She eats crap!  I mean she drinks about 4-5 cans of red bull a day (she finally switched to sugar free, because she was having such a hard time with her diabetes and she was getting the shakes all the time) All of her foods are prepared canned foods, she eats things like canned soups and not the healthy ones, chef boyardee spaghetti, beefaroni, mc donalds, dunkin donuts, she'll go to sams club and buy a whole case of slim jims and sit and eat them 15 at a time as a meal, seriously.  It's sad.  I can't help but feel that the food stamps she's going to be getting are only going to encourage her to be able to buy these foods and in turn making her health worse, and costing the state more money in health costs for her medical care.  If these things were taken off the table of options for her, she'd be so much better off.  There is a serious problem with the system as it is set up now.

post #110 of 181
If it makes anyone feel better, at least here in NM (maybe other states, too?) food stamps can be used at farmer's/grower's markets. Not only that, but they are worth more there. I can't recall if the amount is doubled, or how exactly it works (I saw a sign at a local Grower's Market), but I wanted to mention that. Otherwise, I do agree with others inthat who exactly would get to decide what is and isn't allowed to be bought with food stamps wouldn't work out so well considering all the ties the government has to corn farmers and tons of companies that make unhealthy processed foods. Oh, and grains - it's not like the food pyramid was designed with only people's health in mind - no one needs that much bread, cereal, etc., on a daily basis. No one.

And yeah that to choli, b/c even outside of MDC there are too many varieties as to what is really good for our bodies, not to mention the whole what is a staple and things we could survive off of vs. what is a "luxury". How would it be decided? By voting? And it's silly, b/c food stamps are meant to be a supplement, so most families still spend their own money on food each month... I'd assume if food stamps could only be used on "super nutritious, but cheap!" food, that those who drink a lot of soda and eat a lot of chips are still going to do so, just with their own money -so really, what difference would it make?

 



(I'm not sure why this issues bugs me so much; if someone had came on here asking if they should apply for Medicaid for their family even though they had the option to purchase it through their DH's work for $500 a month -- oh, and they had cable and a few extras -- I'd be just as irritated if others suggested getting rid of pets and scrimping where they could. If hey qualify and would benefit from the help, by all means take it! And don't feel like you have to only see doctors that aren't crappy or luxorious. Food and healthcare I guess just seem like basic human rights to me, and considering the amount of tax dollars wasted on wars and other things, I don't understand why something that actually helps our population is looked down upon. Maybe it's not perfect, but nothing is.)
post #111 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post

 

As a cashier, I have sold fresh lobster to somebody who paid with food stamps. I'm still irritated about it 15 years later. But when it comes right down to it, the income limits for FS are so low that I think anybody who qualifies should take them. I also think there should be a limited selection of staple items that FS will cover, but that's a whole 'nother thread.

 

 


I have tried not to let this thread become personal, well too personal anyway, but this comment REALLY bothered me. As a food stamp recipient, I do in fact eat a lot of beans. And a lot of rice. In fact, we don't purchase meat at the grocery store as to not support factory farming and shitty meat consumption. But I do buy one chicken, a local organic chicken, and 2 lbs. of local beef per month. I do this with my food stamps. What would you think of me?? Would you think I was some jerk wasting away my fs money on good food when really I should be feeding my family some bags of frozen chicken filets? Are those foods more worthy of me since I am poor?

And when my son turned three this year and it wasn't a good affordable option to go out, we cooked at home, a meal he likes. We bought potato chips and applegate farm hot dogs. I did it with my food stamps. The potato chips were too crappy of food to buy, but the hot dogs I'm sure were too good for me.

My husband works, he WORKS! He works for the leading mental health orhganization where we live. He spends everyday at a homeless drop in center. There he faced with mentally ill people, people who are drunk and on drugs, there are fights, he has had loaded guns come into the facility. He goes in on snow days because he knows that this need is greater on those days. He does a job most people would not want to do and he gets paid a small wage to do it.

I think if my hudband decided he wanted a lobster I would arrange our menu to include that. And I don't think some cashier who has NO IDEA where we are coming from has any room to judge me for it.
post #112 of 181

 

And yet, she probably will. Particularly if her own family is going through a bad patch and she's feeling really tense about money in general. 

 

If it makes you feel any better, when she's older and wiser she will realize that a locally harvested lobster is a far more ethical use of her tax dollars than a bag of Doritos.

 

I still have massive, massive problems with the way the FS programs are administered, but I have a problem with the SYSTEM, not the individual user. To wit: 

 

The US govt subsidizes the production of those sugary drinks and junk food.  Millions of dollars go to subsidize the farmers that grow the corn and wheat ingredients.  More is spent on creating markets for these products.  More is spent on buying surplus for the school lunch program.  Millions are spent on subsidizing health care related to the consumption of white flour and sweet drinks (high fructose corn syrup) such as diabetes and heart disease.   I don't find it shocking that such things are allowed to be purchased with food stamps.  Food stamps and farm subsidies are part of the same giant law called the farm bill.  The whole thing is deeply influenced by agribusiness giants who like to wrap the story of the embattled American farmer around the law.  The controlling interests of United States (corporations) want everyone's money spent on sugary drinks and junk food.  Our GDP depends on it.  Until the entire systemic problem is solved, there is no solution to either hunger or obesity: they are two sides of the same coin. 

 

Food is basic human right. The government spends my money to supply the children of poor people with edible foodlike substances instead of actual food, and the consequences of this policy are hideously apparent. I am livid about it. 

post #113 of 181

I'm sorry your feelings got hurt, Matey. It's hard enough when you THINK you are being judged, it's a million times worse when you know they are judging you.

 

And this judgement is what is stopping me from applying for food stamps, even though we could really, really use them and even though we qualify almost twice over.

post #114 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by PenelopeJune View Post

I'm sorry your feelings got hurt, Matey. It's hard enough when you THINK you are being judged, it's a million times worse when you know they are judging you.

 

And this judgement is what is stopping me from applying for food stamps, even though we could really, really use them and even though we qualify almost twice over.


You need to stop giving a rat's @ss about what people on a message board or IRL think, and do what is best for your family. Really, if you qualify, get the food stamps. It does NOT MATTER what judgemental people think. It really doesn't.
 

post #115 of 181

 

It really doesn't. And just so we're clear, I'm all for anybody who qualifies signing up and always have been. But yes, if you are using an EBT card there will absolutely be somebody judging you for something-or-other every time you're at the grocery store. Every damn time. My mom drove 15 miles to another town when she used FS to decrease the chance of running into anybody she knew in the checkout line. 

post #116 of 181

I disagree with the sentiment that just because you quality for food stamps, you should get them. 

 

I think people should really look inside themselves and see if they need them or if they could cut corners someplace else and learn how to make their food dollars stretch or improve their situation.    They are definitely necessary for some people. however that doesn't mean that everyone who qualifies should get them.

I also think there is a real value in learning how to eat stretch food and "make do" and cook from scratch and all that..the way many people did during the Great Depression.  Society as a whole is very wasteful and everything is disposable.  I think back to my grandmother who saved everything and was very thrifty and really admire that.

 

I also do think there should be at least some limits on what you can get with food stamps.  Things like soda, and candy and junk food should be off limits.  Beggars can't be choosers, IMO.

post #117 of 181



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ameliabedelia View Post

I disagree with the sentiment that just because you qualify for food stamps (or any public assistance) that you should get it.  They're okay for certain people in certain situations, but if you  

I also definitely think there should be limits on what you can get with food stamps.  Things like soda, and candy and lots of junk food should not be allowed.  Beggars can't be choosers..yk.

 



 I suppose that applies if you think of people making use of a government run plan to help lower income people feed their families as beggars. I don't.

post #118 of 181

It's just an expression.  It doesn't mean they are actual beggars living on the street.

 

Yes, people have a basic human right for food, and we have a duty to feed the hungry.  However, there is no basic human right to junk food and soda. No one is entitled to have soda, junk food and candy. Most people here would probably even argue that those things are harmful.

post #119 of 181

I have heard that here in CA you cannot buy energy drinks w/fs. But you can buy soda. Some energy drinks, like lo-carb Rockstar, and way healthier than Pepsi (no hf corn syrup and such).

post #120 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by geekgolightly View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by JesKace View Post

ETA: this is not on the original topic, but it sort of seems like the original topic was gone long ago :)


 

 But I'd rather see someone buying lobster than seeing a cart full of chips, soda, cookies, and snack foods.


 


 

Me too! I started receiving food stamps last month and I was shocked that you could buy sugary foods and drinks with a food stamp card. What the heck is that about? It's supposed to be assistance to provide food. Not ding dongs and crap like that. I *really* wish there were prepared snacks limitations.

 

I am not taking WIC because I find their limits *too* limiting. We do not drink milk, I will not eat tuna while pregnant, we do not eat cereal ever and we do not buy fruit juice so we really can use WIC for very little, but if we could have access to fresh fruits and veggies, and meats that would be awesome. So, I think WIC is too limiting and food stamps are not limiting enough.


So, there should be limits on what can be bought with food stamps - and who do you think should get to define those limits? The users of MDC? I'd love to see them fight it out - the vegans, the vegetarians, the TF eaters, the people whose kids have allergies and believe that therefor nobody else should be allowed to eat what their kid is allergic to - everyone who knows it all about nutrition but does not agree with each other. All fighting about what is a "staple",  what is "healthy", what other peoples should be "allowed" to buy with their food stamps..
 



uh, well? I was just talking about candy and ding dongs. ANd in my post, I actually said that WIC was *too* limiting and FS were not limiting enough. I think just about everyone can agree that soda pop and candy and ding dongs are unhealthy. As for different nutritional viewpoints, all agree on this point. I really don't care if you're TF or vegan or whatever! Everyone here, everyone everywhere is in agreement that ding dongs are unhealthy.

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