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Goat's Milk Formula? - Page 2

post #21 of 32

From what I understand, you don't need to give a goat milk formula, just goat milk. Goat milk can be purchased at pretty much any grocery store anywhere. I'm not sure what procedures you have to take, if any, to prepare it for a baby. Goat milk is supposed to be very close to human milk and healthier and more nutritious for babies than formula. You could try looking it up to see what info you can find. Here are some links I pulled up at a glance, but I haven't read through each one thoroughly. Dr. Sears recommends it!

 

http://www.parenting.com/article/ask-dr-sears-advantages-of-goats-milk

 

http://www.healthnews-nz.com/infants.html

 

http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/milk/milk-supplements.html

post #22 of 32


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by amberskyfire View Post

From what I understand, you don't need to give a goat milk formula, just goat milk. Goat milk can be purchased at pretty much any grocery store anywhere. I'm not sure what procedures you have to take, if any, to prepare it for a baby. Goat milk is supposed to be very close to human milk and healthier and more nutritious for babies than formula. You could try looking it up to see what info you can find. Here are some links I pulled up at a glance, but I haven't read through each one thoroughly. Dr. Sears recommends it!

 

http://www.parenting.com/article/ask-dr-sears-advantages-of-goats-milk

 

http://www.healthnews-nz.com/infants.html

 

http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/milk/milk-supplements.html


In case someone reads this thread but not the links, Kellymom says NOT to give goat's milk to a baby under 6 months old, and not regularly between 6-12 months.

 

From the kellymom link above:

"Goat's milk is no more appropriate to give baby than cow's milk. If you need to supplement and breastmilk is not available, formulas are a more nutritionally complete product."

 

and:

"goat milk is much closer in composition to cow milk than human milk. Goat's milk is high in sodium (like cow's milk) and is very high in chloride and potassium, which makes the renal solute load too high for babies. This can cause gastrointestinal bleeding and can result in anemia and poor growth (these problems are usually undetected until months later). Goat milk is also deficient in folic acid, which can lead to megaloblastic anemia."

 

 

(note, this info is about plain goat milk, not goat milk formula which was the OP's interest.)

post #23 of 32

From the Dr. Sear's link the PP posted above:  Generally, the American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend the use of goat's or cow's milk products in infants under one year because they can cause intestinal irritation and anemia. Infants under one year of age who are allergic to cow's milk-based formulas, soy formulas, or hypoallergenic formulas are sometimes put on goat's milk formula, but only with consultation from baby's doctor or a pediatric nutritionist.

 

 

post #24 of 32

Interesting thread. I might try this for supplementing when I go back to work (DS2 will be almost 1, but is cow's milk sensitive, so switching to cow's milk won't work). DS2 is soy and cow's milk protein intolerant. No one has mentioned it yet, but when I asked my doctor about goat's milk, he said that the protein in goat's milk is very similar to that of cow's milk, so it was likely to cause the same reaction. We never tried (this was with DS1, also reactive to soy and cow's milk for about 18 months). Have your babies with cow's milk intolerance been able to tolerate goat's milk just fine?

post #25 of 32

Our local Whole Foods recently started carrying a goat's milk formula. Your location should be able to order some to try. This is what it looks like http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=goats+milk+formula&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&oe=&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=1112315690926604001&sa=X&ei=zPFCTt-zApDEsQL4xcXCCQ&ved=0CDYQ8wIwAA#

 

It is labeled toddler formula but I assumed tht is to be in compliance with WHO breastfeeding code about not promoting artifical milks, but it may not be. Baby's Own does the same thing. You might email the company to double-check.

 

I would not recommend straight goat's milk for an infant under one. It is not adequate nutrition for an infant.  It is not some magic fluid close to breast milk. It is a myth that it is so much better than cow's milk. Some toddlers and adults can tolerate it better than cow's milk.  It is the milk of another species with none of the protein tinkering or added nutrients of formula. You would be better off with one of the many broken down protein types. (And I have an adopted cousin who was fed homemade raw goat's milk formula with a host of issues traced to it) Your ped can probably provide you with samples of different kinds to see what works.

 

Best of luck.

post #26 of 32

Thanks, all! I'm sorry, I somehow misread baby's age. I thought baby was 10 months for some reason.

post #27 of 32

Hi, Thanks for posting this.

 

I actually found a company that will ship to North America. I'm in Canada, and my shipment is being allowed to pass through Border Services. An officer from the "Border Patrol" who inspects shipments coming in called me today, to inquire as to why I needed the goods. I was so thankful that her allowed the goods to "pass" through. Apparently in Canada, you need a special certificate or a permit if you will, from the givernment that "clears" thr product. It's called the Zoo Sanitary Export Certificate. Did you have an issue like this? Thanks in advance!

post #28 of 32

I second the suggestion of, for a baby 5 months old, considering solids if it's filling in for only one missed feed per day, with the caveat that it is important to make sure those solids have some fat to them, especially if baby is having trouble gaining. Adding the "cream" from canned coconut milk was a near-miracle for my second child, who had a metabolic issue. Extra virgin coconut oil is also good, but harder to use with a baby that age. 

 

It's important also to remember that while many people can tolerate goat milk who don't tolerate cow, there are also many people who can't do either.

post #29 of 32

Hello,

 

I have studied nutrition for 9 years and have done extensive research on goats milk formula. Whether you're making it yourself or are buying it completely fortified it IS safe for infants. The concept that our governments think it is unsafe is ridiculous! What have humans been drinking for thousands of years? Certainly NOT cows milk. Does anyone here know that only 3% of humans can actually digest cows milk? I am one of them (I've had every food intolerance test done) and YES, I can completely digest cows milk without any issues whatsoever. I guess that was Gods way of blessing me because I am practically allergic to everything else and what a blessing it is because I LOVE cheese. Anyway, back to my point...The reason Dr. Sears says that it shouldn't be given to children under the age of 1 is because the USA Food and Drug Administration forces him and every other person supporting it to say that. The FDA is in bed with the dairy farmers and there's a lot of money to be made. They could care less about the health and nutrition of their citizens. Everything is about how much money can be made and the whole thing makes me sick to my stomach. The other issue is that goats milk is much higher in protein than cows milk so it needs to be diluted and gradually increased as the child gets older. If you are making it from scratch you need to fortify it with the proper nutrition (vitamins, minerals, fats, a sugar, Omega-3's ) for proper development. So, people that are ignorant might case harm to their child if they don't follow the directions properly. Hence the need for regulations and warnings. We could cause harm to ourselves by swallowing too much toothpaste too but you don't see them taking that off the shelves. The whole thing amounts to ignorance and common sense. I have personally witnessed infants tolerate goats milk much better than cows milk. The FDA also recommends that we NEVER give an infant milk from a carton but what do they think is in milk based formulas? MILK!!! Ignorance is bliss I guess.

 

I would like to know your contact for purchasing the formula if I could. I am in the US but have contacts in Canada and I guess they're opening up the border between the US and Canada so maybe I could get some to the US for a few people that want the convenience of having it ready to feed.

 

Best of luck!

post #30 of 32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyDolphin View Post

Hi, Thanks for posting this.

 

I actually found a company that will ship to North America. I'm in Canada, and my shipment is being allowed to pass through Border Services. An officer from the "Border Patrol" who inspects shipments coming in called me today, to inquire as to why I needed the goods. I was so thankful that her allowed the goods to "pass" through. Apparently in Canada, you need a special certificate or a permit if you will, from the givernment that "clears" thr product. It's called the Zoo Sanitary Export Certificate. Did you have an issue like this? Thanks in advance!


Would you be willing to give me the name of the company you purchased the formula from? I would like to see if I can get it in the US. Thankssmile.gif
 

 

post #31 of 32

I am really interested in the nutritional breakdown of your goat milk formula because you can seldom find this on the net.  I have been dealing with infant eczema since 1 month old , it's been 3 months now, I don't know how to make it better.  Am willing to try goat milk.  Too bad in Canada I can't find goat milk with folic acid like meyenberg.

post #32 of 32

can you email me the goat milk formula nutritional breakdown?  hope1230@hotmail.com

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