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My dd got told to not wear her hair like that! - Page 2

post #21 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by radish View Post

hmm, just wondering, her reply made it sound as though it had been done with a curler, which might explain why she thought it was not appropriate...?

"No, her hair is not messy.  Part of her hair was pulled back today, with a section curled and loose in the front."


oooh ha ha.

No she curled it with sponge rollers the night before.  But it turned out just a little waveyish. he he
 

post #22 of 58

Regardless, I don't see how it makes a difference.  If it wasn't hanging in her face to distract her learning, I don't see how it could distract anyone else.  :)

post #23 of 58

I'm not sure if you are joking by saying haha but I can see that "curled" hair in that style could be a distraction.

 

Honestly, *that* is why I am at a WS. I do not want my 10 year old coming home asking for highlights and a curling iron LOL

Of course, I still wont do it but I prefer to have it a non-issue.

 

I stand by our schools dress (and hair/make-up) policy 100%.

post #24 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by radish View Post

I'm not sure if you are joking by saying haha but I can see that "curled" hair in that style could be a distraction.

 

Honestly, *that* is why I am at a WS. I do not want my 10 year old coming home asking for highlights and a curling iron LOL

Of course, I still wont do it but I prefer to have it a non-issue.

 

I stand by our schools dress (and hair/make-up) policy 100%.


lol, I'm not sure sponge rollers have been a fashion draw since the 50s.  I don't exactly see using old lady beauty products (and we're talking great grandma's teen fashion fads here) as kids growing up too fast... unless you're talking 9 going on 90.  When I was little, I used to make my mother put my hair up in rag curls, like in one of the Little House books.  What's funny is that, naturally, my hair is very curly!  But it was just the sort of make-believe I liked to play: that I lived in the olden days.

 

As someone who has naturally curly hair, I don't see how curly hair is a "distraction."

post #25 of 58

I dont think the other 10 year-olds know *how* the curls got there (hot iron vs sponge) just that they are new/fun/interesting, on a child (who I assume) does not have naturally curly hair.

And I doubt the teacher thinks naturally curly hair is a distraction. :)

 

I assume the hair style looks similar to this (first few pix) 

If so, I see how it can be a physical distraction-hair in face and a social distraction.

 

Our school dress code does not allow hair color, make-up, nail polish etc until the upper grades (6-8). Even then it is at the teachers/schools discretion.

post #26 of 58
Thread Starter 

Here's a pic of her hair the day she got told:

https://picasaweb.google.com/michelermt/AngieSHair#5574527666782009378

 

I know now it's because the long hunk was in her face.  It had nothing  to do with the curls as you can see her hair wasn't that curly.  By the way, I wore sponge rollers in my hair EVERY night from kindergarden to grade 2.  So it's not a teen thing. (I hated those curls!) 

Also the teacher had NO idea that she streaked her hair.  Plus her hair is naturally frizzy/wavey if you will. 

Her new style is https://picasaweb.google.com/michelermt/ValentineSParty#5572639705123550434  Which I like waaaaaaaaaaay way way better but notice it's still in her face. (She's the middle child here.)

 

The teacher also didn't notice she got a manicure.  Her nail polish was clear with a bit of sparkel.

I'm a reg. massage therapist so of course she's going to be curious and interested in that kind of thing.

Also we have the exact same rules about make up etc.  Grade 6 they're allowed but it has to be nice not naughty. :)

 

Oh and that avatar pic is the BEFORE she got streaks, as you can see, it looks the same.

I don't think that would cause your and any other child to say 'I want a curling iron and I want to get my hair coloured!'.

If so bring out those dumb sponge rollers.  he he

post #27 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by radish View Post

 

I stand by our schools dress (and hair/make-up) policy 100%.



Well good for you!

post #28 of 58
I'm really glad our WS does not have this level of involvement in the kids' lives!
post #29 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DariusMom View Post

I'm really glad our WS does not have this level of involvement in the kids' lives!


 Yes, I think it's a bit much.  ;)

post #30 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleRMT View Post





 Yes, I think it's a bit much.  wink1.gif


Definitely! And, sorry if I sounded snarky! No snark intended at *you*; rather, much snark going to the school.

It's this kind of stuff that gives Waldorf a bad name, I think. Like with so much in life, it's all about balance. I think it's fine to put some limits on rampant Disneyfication and make sure sugar-filled crap isn't being given out at school. I think it's another thing to be worrying about a bit of hair that doesn't seem to be causing anyone any problems!
post #31 of 58
Thread Starter 

oh no you didn't sound snarkey AT ALL.  no no no!  love.gif

You're right, when some Waldorf school and teachers still getting too controlling, parents like me getting kind of weirded out.

Our school is majorly talking about implementing UNIFORMS!!!  Just because of a few grade 8 girls are dressing terribly, the rest of us may have to suffer!  And when I say terribly I mean (you know um revealing).

post #32 of 58
I'm curious as to why you would keep paying money to send your daughter to a school you have problem after problem with.
post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post

I would firmly point out to the teacher that it's not up to her to decide how your daughter wears her hair. As I have done before and will do again should the situation arises. Unless someone thing is clearly a violation of the dress code, the teacher has no right to dictate what any child does with his or her hair.



 Yes, this is your decision, not the teacher's.

post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleRMT View Post

Yes I agree.  I chatted with her after school and she backed down.  :)


Good!
 

post #35 of 58

I think maybe we are at the same school (I just do parent and tot.)  Your dd's hair looks just like all the other girls her age I see around the school!  I have actually found the atmosphere to be a bit stifling when it comes to following the 'rules' as well.  Not that they don't have a place, but there seems to be an emphasis on doing what the teacher says even when its a grey area.

post #36 of 58

Did the teacher say why it was not appropriate? I can see if the girls are starting to pay more attention to their hair, etc and thus being distracted from academic work. The reason for the dress code is not conformity, but freedom to learn unencumbered by needless distractions.

 

My dd is in the first grade and she has learned that if she braids her hair after  her bath at night her hair will have funky waves in the morning. The teacher has never mentioned it. And my dd sees me put on makeup and do my hair every morning, so she wants to wear makeup so badly. However, if it became an issue with the hair I would respect the teacher's desires. 

 

Another undercurrent here is the amount of respect and deference given to the teacher. I hope any dissent was done outside of the presence of the children. Even if you disagree with the teacher, there is a time and place for it. Undermining the teacher's authority for the sake of winning a petty argument/ power struggle  is damaging. 

post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by DariusMom View Post

I'm really glad our WS does not have this level of involvement in the kids' lives!


I dont think it is involvement in their entire "lives" just what works and what doesnt work *at school* and in the classroom. Again, I am happy the teachers and staff put so much thought into what is important and what affects children. I doubt you get that anywhere else...

 

At home, we wear nail polish, play with make-up, etc.

post #38 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post

I'm curious as to why you would keep paying money to send your daughter to a school you have problem after problem with.



because on the whole, she's happy there.  And no matter where we are at, I'm going to find something to bitch about. :)

post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleRMT View Post





because on the whole, she's happy there.  And no matter where we are at, I'm going to find something to bitch about. :)


lol.gif Fair enough.
post #40 of 58

Saw this thread in the forum list. Can't speak to the Waldorf side of things, but hair-wise she looks like her hair was braided wet.

 

I could see the front chunk of hair being an issue if she kept brushing it out of her face. But only if all loose hair is prohibited.

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